The Works of Richard Brinsley Sheridan: Dramas, Poems, Translations, Speeches, Unfinished Sketches, and Ana

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Chatto & Windus, 1913 - 656 pages
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Page 114 - I'll tell you what, Jack — I mean, you dog — if you don't, by Capt. A. What, Sir, promise to link myself to some mass of ugliness ; to Sir A. Zounds ! sirrah ! the lady shall be as ugly as I choose : she shall have a hump on each shoulder ; she shall be as crooked as the crescent ; her one eye shall roll like the bull's in Cox's museum ; she shall have a skin like a mummy, and the beard of a Jew — She shall be all this, sirrah ! yet I'll make you ogle her all day, and sit up all night, to write...
Page 99 - But you know I lose most of my fortune if I marry without my aunt's consent, till of age; and that is what I have determined to do, ever since I knew the penalty.
Page 156 - Ay. — Who are those yonder getting over the stile? Acres. There are two of them indeed ! — well — let them come — hey, Sir Lucius ! — we — we — we — we — won't run. Sir Luc. Run ! Acres. No — I say — we won't run, by my valour! Sir Luc. What the devil's the matter with you?
Page 245 - Oliver's liberality gave them an early independence. Of course, no person could have more opportunities of judging of their hearts, and I was never mistaken in my life. Joseph is indeed a model for the young men of the age. He is a man of sentiment, and acts up to the sentiments he professes; but for the other, take my word for't, if he had any grain of virtue by descent, he has dissipated it with the rest of his inheritance.
Page 263 - Agreed! agreed! And now, my dear Sir Peter, we are of a mind once more, we may be the happiest couple, and never differ again, you know: ha! ha! ha! Well, you are going to be in a passion, I see, and I shall only interrupt you — so, bye! bye!
Page 260 - Well, go bring me this Snake, and I'll hear what he has to say presently. I see Maria, and want to speak with her. — [Exit ROWLEY.] I should be glad to be convinced my suspicions of Lady Teazle and Charles were unjust. I have never yet opened my mind on this subject to my friend Joseph — I am determined I will do it — he will give me his opinion sincerely. Enter MARIA.
Page 263 - tis evident you never cared a pin for me, and I was a madman to marry you — a pert, rural coquette, that had refused half the honest squires in the neighborhood.
Page 50 - ... duodecimo phaeton, she desired me to write some verses on her ponies; upon which, I took out my pocketbook, and in one moment produced the following : " Sure never were seen two such beautiful ponies ; Other horses are clowns, but these macaronies : To give them this title I'm sure can't be wrong, Their legs are so slim, and their tails are so long.
Page 155 - Why, you may think there's no being shot at without a little risk — and, if an unlucky bullet should carry a quietus with it — I say, it will be no time then to be bothering you about family
Page 37 - Well, I'll not debate how far scandal may be allowable ; but in a man, I am sure, it is always contemptible. We...

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