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1. TITLE. Patriarchism, Judaism, and Chris-

tianity, are but as the bud, the flower, and the

fruit of the tree of life, which shall eventually

satisfy the earth with its spiritual food. All

the prophets, and Balaam amongst them, spake

under the same influence, on the same plan, for

the same end. The third and fourth prophecies
of Balaam are a declaration of the power of
ancient Israel, and the final establishment of
the spiritual kingdom of Christ. The fifth and
last prophecy of Balaam is the summary of all
prophecy in its regular history and order from
his own day to the day of judgment. He alone
is wise who receives Christ as the Prophet to

teach him, the Priest to atone for him, and the

King to rule over him.

2. INTRODUCTION.

3. PORTION OF SCRIPTURE. NUMBERS xxiii,

27, to the end. xxiv. xxxiii. 49.
4. PRAYER. That as the angels of heaven learn

from the Church the manifold wisdom of God,
we may also now begin the contemplations
which shall form a part of the happiness and
employment of our immortality, by surveying
the past, the present, and the future dispensa-
tions of the Providence of God. That we be-
come the members of the spiritual Church of
God, as well as of the visible Israel. That

Christ be our Star and Sceptre, our Prophet,

Priest, and King; the Way in which we should

walk; the Truth in which we believe; and the

Life which we begin to live now, and hope to

live for ever.

5. Notes. On Balaam's prediction respecting

the “ Star" and the “ Sceptre," and its double

reference: to David and to the Messiah.-On

the prediction of Balaam, “He shall smite the

corners of Moab, and destroy all the children of

Sheth."-On the fulfilment of the prophecies

respecting the destruction of the Amalekites, in

the reigns of Saul and David.—On “ Chittim,"

.

meaning of the word translated in Numb. xxi.

6," fiery serpents."-On the typical character
and import of “the brazen serpent."-On the

capture of Heshbon, (Numb. xxi. 26.) once a

city of the Moabites, by the children of Israel.

-On the import of the words vinady.

SECTION 158.-p. 644.

1. Title. To appreciate rightly those portions

of Scripture which are most contrary to modern

experience, we must always take into considera-

tion the object of the plan of Revelation, and
the circumstances of the day when the events

recorded took place. The Israelites arrive, at
the forty-first encampment, in sight of the Pro-
mised Land. The inconsistencies of the be-
lievers in the God of Israel generally arise
from their attempts to reconcile Divine truths
with human errors. The character and con-
duct of the prophet Balaam. The cause of his

miraculous reproofs by the mouth of his ass.

2. INTRODUCTION.

3. PORTION OF SCRIPTURE. NUMBERS xxxiii.

48. xxii. 1-35.

4. PRAYER. That we never be guilty of the

folly which makes the experience of the day in
which we live, the criterion of the truth of the
events recorded in Revelation. That we never
be tempted by the rewards and honours of the
world, to oppose the will, or deny the truth, of
God. That we never confound the inventions
and additions of men with the actual Revelation
of that truth. That we especially guard our
hearts against “the love of money, the root of

all evil."

5. Notes. On the country of Balaam.-On the

king of Moab's needless apprehension of being

harmed by the children of Israel.—On the

force of the term rendered, “ rewards of divina-

tion."

SECTION 159.-p. 653.

.כְּתִּים

SECTION 161.-p. 671.

1. TITLE. Balaam was regarded as imbued with

the spirit of prophecy, because he was the pa-

triarchal chief of his people. He was the last

prophet of the patriarchal dispensation. The

two first prophecies of Balaam have been, are

being, and will be, fulfilled in every age of the

world. The prophecies of the Word of God

have the force of a law of nature upon the his-

tory of mankind.

2. INTRODUCTION.

3. PORTION OF SCRIPTURE. NUMBERS xxii.

36, to the end. xxüi. 1-26.

4. PRAYER. That whatever be the curses, the

hatred, or the contempt of an unrepentant,

apostate, or infidel world, we may ever remain

in the communion of the visible Church, and

partake of the blessing on God's spiritual Israel.

That we never be found among the despisers of

God's Religion ; but live the life, and 'die the

death, of the righteous. And that we learn

from the fulfilment of the prophecies to His

ancient Church the certain accomplishment of

all God's promises to the soul of the believer,

and of all God's threatenings to the soul of the

infidel.

1. TITLE. Idolatry is the dividing the affections

of the heart with God. The last encampment

of the Israelites, and the last act of idolatry in

the wilderness. Zeal for God's glory the source

of man's honour and happiness. The praise of

Phinehas. All God's threatenings are prophe-

cies, and will certainly be accomplished. The

generation which came from Egypt perishes in

the wilderness, as God had decreed. The first

act of the youthful generation, before they pos-

sess Canaan, is the destruction of the idolaters

of Midian, who had corrupted them. God's

gifts are different from God's graces. The pro-

phet Balaam is slain as an enemy, among the
enemies of Israel. The Canaanites are to be

extirpated. The destruction of the sins of the

soul is essential to the holy rest in heaven.

2. INTRODUCTION. 3. PORTION OF SCRIPTURE. NUMBERS xxv.

1-13. 16–18. xxvi. 1, 2. 64, 65. xxxi. 1, 2.

7-9. 16. xxxii. 50, to the end. 4. PRAYER. That we never believe ourselves to

be exempted from the possibility of the greatest sins. That we give the whole heart to God. That we be zealous to reprove sin in others, and watchful to restrain it in ourselves. That we ever remember the certainty of the approaching death of the body, and resolutely contend against every inordinate affection that may divide the heart with God. That we never forget the difference between the gifts and the graces of the Holy Spirit; but, putting on the whole armour of God, contend against all our spiritual enemies, till we rest in heaven.

3. Portion of SCRIPTURE. DEUTERONOMY

iv. 1-10. 32–36. vi. 449. vii. 6. ix. 4, 5.

x. 12–14. 21. xi. 22_25. 4. PRAYER. For the blessing of God upon the

empire of Great Britain. That as we possess the Bible, freedom, and the Church, and have experienced many and great political and national mercies, we may prove our gratitude to God by becoming the spiritual learen of the world in the latter days. That we promote national religious education at home. That we remember our own unworthiness. That we keep God's law; and that our Government and our Church, our nobles and our clergy, our merchants and our people, be all zealous for

the glory of God. 5. Note. On the extent of the dominions of

Israel in the reigns of David and Solomon.

SECTION 162.-p. 678.

SECTION 164.—p. 694.

1. Title. All the circumstances of a man's life

may be summed up under these five divisions :The knowledge he has acquired; the sins he las committed ; the sorrows he has suffered ; the mercies he has received; and the last hours he anticipates. Moses reminds the Israelites of all these at the end of their journeyings through the wilderness. Obedience to God's law being imperfect, cannot render the soul of man fit for heaven. Joshua, not Moses, is appointed to

lead the people into Canaan. 2. INTRODUCTION. 3. PORTION OF SCRIPTURE. DEUTERONOMY

i. 1-8. 19. ii. 1. 8. 14. 16–18. 24, 25. iii. 1,

2. 21, to the end. 4. Prayer. That we be enabled, both now, and

at the hour of death, when we look back on all the way which the Lord our God has led us through the wilderness of life, to remember that our knowledge has been blessed to the benefit of our souls. That we have repented of our sins, have been resigned to our sorrows, have been thankful for the mercies we have received, and are prepared to die. That we have no dependence on our own excellencies as the foundation of our hope of God's favour, but that God's mercy through Christ is the basis of our faith and hope.

1. TITLE. Idolatry is the alienation of the heart

from God. In addition to the lust of the flesh, the lust of the eye, and the pride of life, four great temptations entice and influence the heart :-false philosophy, pride of reasoning, morbid sentimentality, and inordinate affection, All these were condemned by the laws against idolatry in the altars, pillars, groves, and images of the heathen. God is to be honoured in that way alone which He Himself has commanded; and all sacrifices to Him are to be without known blemish. Obedience and duty are the

foundation of acceptable prayer. 2. INTRODUCTION. 3. PORTION OF SCRIPTURE, DEUTERONOMY

xii. 1-3. xiii. 1-11. xvi. 21, 22. xvii. l.

xxvi. 12, to the end. 4. PRAYER. That we be guided to God and to

heaven by the Revelation of God alone. That we never be perverted from the Faith by the Philosophy which corrupts the simplicity of the Truth, by the objections of pride and false reasoning, by the influence of kindred, or by the pretensions of the corrupt Church of Rome. That we give the heart, without wilful blemish, to God. And that we aspire to the best privileges of the Christian, by fulfilling our humble

duties, and offering our humblest prayers. 5. Notes. On the meaning of the word onis,

rendered “their pillars," by our translators. -On the meaning of the word en translated “a grove," Deut. xii. 3.

SECTION 163.-p. 686.

1. TITLE. God is unchangeable, and therefore

the spirit, the object, though not the letter, of His Law is also unchangeable. One object of that Law is to make nations as well as individuals, and the world as well as its separate nations, religious and united.

The summary of the Law of Moses. The observance of the Divine Law is a proof of national wisdom, and a pledge of national greatness. Past mercies are the reasons for the perfect love of God. Universal religious education solemnly commanded. Obedience the token of gratitude. Political influence the consequence of national religious obedience. Great Britain will preserve and extend her political influence, if she employs her power to the bonour of God and

the good of man. 2. INTRODUCTION.

SECTION 165.-p. 702. 1. TITLE. The history of the Holy Land and of

the family of Abraham is the key to unlock the wholé mystery of the Providence which governs the world.

Not only are general blessings promised to the obedience of the Jews, and general curses denounced against their disobedience, but the peculiar points of their history are foretold, the miseries of the sieges of Jerusalem by the Chaldæans and the Romans, and their present dispersion. The exile of the Jews from Judea was the consequence of their rejecting a spiritual Messiah. The sight of a Jew is an evidence of the past, the present, and us and to our children for ever, that we may
do all the words of this law," Deut. xxix. 29.

SECTION 166.-p. 717.

1. TITLE. The Covenant of accepted repentance

added to the Covenant of Sinai. The duty of
covenanting with God. The nature of ihat
duty is explained by the union of the word
“Lord" with “God.” The meaning of the
word Covenant in revealed Religion. Three
modes of covenanting with God. One only is
to be adopted. The last general exhortation of
Moses to the People. The future is the secret
thing, known to God alone; the present is
known to man for his direction and guidance.
The promise of the acceptance of repentance is
a part of God's covenant. The present dis-
persion of the Jews a pledge of their restoration.
Eternal life, or eternal death, the result of the

choice of man.

2. INTRODUCTION.

3. PORTION OF SCRIPTURE. DEUTERONOMY

xxix. 1. 10–15. 29.

NUMBERS

Xxxvi. 13.

4. PRAYER. That the Giver of Revelation, the

Creator and Preserver of the world, be the

Lord we honour, and the God we love. That

we make our solemn covenant with God, pray-

ing for grace attendant on the means of grace.

That we ever plead with God the merits of the

great Sacrifice. And that we choose life before

death--the blessing before the curse and love

God now, and rest with God and Christ for

5. Note. On the interpretation of “ The secret

things belong unto the Lord our God: but

those things which are revealed belong unto

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2. INTRODUCTION.

3. PORTION OF SCRIPTURE. DEUTERONOMY

xxxii. 48, to the end, xxxiii.

4. PRAYER. That no false theories of philosophy

withdraw us from the conviction of the presence
and influence of the Holy Spirit of God upon
the understanding, the reason, the will, and the
affections of the human mind. That we ever
scek our spiritual blessings from the divine and
omnipresent power of the Holy Spirit, which
Christ promised to His Church and its mem-
bere. That we ever possess spiritually the
blessings which were granted temporally to the
twelve tribes separately; and that we obtain the
better blessings which He has pronounced on
the Church of Israel generally. That the eter-
nal God be our refuge. That we be separated
from the follies and sins of the world, and
be guided in safety by God's grace and power
to the better and heavenly Canaan.

1. TITLE. As a flower, breaking forth from the

bud in the midst of summer, finds itself in

the presence of the glorious sun, the blue sky,

and the green earth, all of which were there

before, so the Christian soul, bursting from the

prison of the body, will find itself in the

manifested presence of God, of Christ, and of

the state of souls departed. The death of

Moses, his continued existence, his appearance

at the Transfiguration of our Lord, and the

subject of his conversation there. The cha-

racter of Moses. The gathering of the spirits

of the members of the Universal Church in the

invisible world.

2. INTRODUCTION.

3. PORTION OF SCRIPTURE. DEUTERO-

NOMY xxxiv.

4. PRAYER. That we be prepared to meet God

in death and in the world of souls, by the faith

which produces love, and hope, and obedience.

That we delight in the contemplation of the

promise of the happiness of the world beyond

the grave. That we obey God, not in the spirit

of bondage, as the servant and the slave, but in

the spirit of adoption, as the children of God,

the brethren of Christ, and the joint heirs with

Him of the best inheritance of the soul. That

God's Holy Spirit give a right judgment to our

intellect and reason, and holy comfort to our

will and affections in the prospect of death,

and the hope of heaven.

5. NOTES. On the structure of the Book of

Deuteronomy.-On the words in DNT,

rendered by our translators, "the utmost sea.'

-On the history of Moses. The remarkable

confirmation of the truth of the declaration that

he “refused to be called the son of Pharaoh's

daughter." The meaning of his being a gathered
to his fathers;" his appearance at the Trans-

figuration; and his present existence.

JOURNEYS OF THE ISRAELITES IN THE WI-

DERNESS, p. 771.

1. TITLE. Revelation and prophecy anticipated

history, philosophy, and experience. The in-
fluence of the Divine power acts upon the
human mind according to the laws of mind, as
explained by ancient and modern metaphy-
sicians; and it still continues, that prophecy
may be fulfilled. The blessing of Moses on the
twelve tribes must be primarily interpreted of
their temporal, not of their spiritual, condition.
Moses predicts the continuance of REUBEN, and
probably the powerlessness of SIMEON ; the
prosperity of Judah; the religious influence of
Levi; the power of BENJAMIN; the wealth of
JOSEPH; the commerce of ZEBULUN; the agri-
culture of ISSACHAR ; the military zeal of
GAD; the violence of DAN; the fertility of
NAPHTALI; the quietness of ASHER; the sepa-
ration of Israel from other nations; and their
safe establishment in Canaan,

TO

THE PRELATES OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH.

I. THE CHRISTIAN RELIGION, IN ITS PRIMITIVE FORM, IS THE CHIEF REMEDY

FOR ALL POLITICAL AND MORAL EVILS, AND ESPECIALLY FOR THE EVILS
OF REVOLUTIONARY MOVEMENTS.

II. THE BISHOPS OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH HAVE BEEN THE PRINCIPAL CAUSES

OF THE FAILURE OF THE SUCCESS OF CHRISTIANITY.

III. THE RESUMPTION OF THE APOSTOLIC OFFICE IS THE CHIEF REMEDY FOR

EPISCOPAL NEGLIGENCE ; AND AFFORDS THE BEST HOPE OF THE ACCOM-
PLISHMENT OF THE PROPHECIES, WHICH PREDICT THE TRIUMPH OF JESUS
CHRIST, AND THE GREATEST EARTHLY HAPPINESS OF MAN.

1. The Sacred Volume which contains the revelation of God's will, and of

man's duty and destiny, is received by all professing Christians of every Church as the principal foundation of their common faith and hope. It predicts also the complete and final destruction of evil by means, which, however apparently diversified or fortuitous, constantly and undeviatingly tend to one point,—the transforming of the kingdoms

of this world into the kingdom of our Lord and of His Christ. II. Our hope of the final and complete triumph of good over evil is founded

upon the solid and immovable basis of the written word of God, which testifies that the wickedness, and consequent misery, which degrades and afflicts mankind, can be removed by Christianity alone; the only source of holiness among individuals, morality among societies, and

peace among nations. III. Review of the present state of the Catholic Church throughout the world.

The high pretensions of the Clergy not borne out by the fruits of their ministrations. The word Church substituted by them for the word

Christ. IV. Theology a science capable of indefinite enlargement by an assiduous and

reverential study of the Word of God, which is its source and foundation. The impiety and arrogance of the papal interdiction of the general perusal, and study, of the whole Volume of Scripture.

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