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Of these there were

two sorts :

rof these there were a certain number fixed and

stated, and continually offered up year by 1. For the whole

year. Two were offered up daily ; besides

the additionals on every sabbath, new moon, congregation

and festival, the number of which amounted
in a year to 1243 head of the herd and flock.

See Numb. xxviii. xxix.
2. For private persons. Many of these were voluntarily offered.

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Of these there were

two sorts mentioned by the Jews :

pl. so bwn, offering for a doubtful trespass, Lev. v. 17, 18.

(1. For a Nazarite, Numb. vi. 12. 17. (Must be

eaten the same day.) For 2. For the leper, Lev. xiv. 12. certain known 3. For one defiled with a Hebrew bondwoman, sins,

Lev, xix. 20, 21. 4. For one guilty of sacrilege, Lev. v. 16. 5. For one that failed in a trust, Lev, vi. 2–6.

,אשם וראי .2

Of these there were three sorts :

1. The thanksgiving ; must be eaten the same

day, Lev, vii. 15. 2. The vow; this was obligatory; and the victim

must be perfect. 3. The voluntary offering. A less perfect victim

would suffice.

(1. The congregation; in which case the remainder was for the priest.

ri. The fat and the kidneys for God, D'110X,

burnt upon the altar, or God's table, Lev.

iii. 2–6. 2. Private persons : in which case the 2. The priest's portion ; breast and shoulder, with sacrifice was divided into three

the two jaws and the maw, Lev. vii. 31, 32. parts :

3. The offerer's portion ; three-fourths of the

whole, which might be eaten any where in Jerusalem, or in a clean place in the camp.

Some were for the whole congregation,

(l. The waved sheaf, Lev. xxii. 11.
2. The two waved loaves, Lev. xxiii. 17.
3. The shew bread, Exod. xxv. 11.

SCRIPTURAL COMMUNION WITH GOD;

OR, THE

HOLY BIBLE,

ARRANGED IN HISTORICAL AND CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER,

NEWLY DIVIDED INTO SECTIONS,

FOR

FAMILIES AND INDIVIDUALS;

WITH INTRODUCTIONS AND PRAYERS;

AND

NOTES FOR THE STUDENT AND INQUIRER.

BY THE

REV. GEORGE TOWNSEND, D.D.

CANON OP DURHAM ;
AUTHOR OP THE HISTORICAL AND CHRONOLOGICAL ARRANGEMENT OF THE

HOLY BIBLE.”

66

PART VI.

CONTENTS OF PART VI.

PAGE

93

Dedication to the Prelates of the Catholic Church

I. The Christian religion, in its primitive form, is the chief remedy for all political and moral

evils, and especially for the evils of revolutionary movements.-II. The Bishops of the Catholic

Church have been the principal causes of the failure of the success of Christianity:-III, The

resumption of the Apostolic office is the chief remedy for episcopal negligence; and affords the

best hope of the accomplishment of the prophecies, which predict the triumph of Jesus Christ,

and the greatest earthly happiness of man.

1. The Sacred Volume, which contains the revelation of God's will, and of man's duty and destiny,

is received by all professing Christians of every Church as the principal foundation of their

common faith and hope. It predicts also the complete and final destruction of evil by means

which, however apparently diversified or fortuitous, constantly and undeviatingly tend to one

point, the transforming of the kingdoms of this world into the kingdom of our Lord and of

His Christ.-II. Our hope of the final and complete triumph of good over evil is founded upon

the solid and immovable basis of the written word of God, which testifies that the wickedness,

and consequent misery, which degrades and afflicts mankind, can be removed by Christianity

alone; the only source of holiness among individuals, morality among societies, and peace

among nations.—III. Review of the present state of the Catholic Church throughout the world.

The high pretensions of the Clergy not borne ont by the fruits of their ministrations. The

word Church substituted by them for the word Christ.-IV. Thcology a science capable of

indefinite enlargement by an assiduous and reverential study of the Word of God, which is its

source and foundation. The impiety and arrogance of the papal interdiction of the general

perusal, and study, of the whole Volume of Scripture.–V. The Episcopate of the Anglican Church

chargeable with the error of reminding their people rather of the Reformation, than of Chris-

tianity; and of the temporary and parliamentary regulations of their worship, than of the

inherent reasonableness of their holy services. A system of religious instruction more com-

mensurate with the wide field of Scriptural teaching is required by the Laity in the present day,

Future triumphs reserved for the due discharge of the ministerial office.-VI. Importance, and

inevitable necessity, of inquiring into the cause which has hitherto impeded the progress of true

religion. The cause pointed out.-VII. The true meaning of the word “ Apostle," as applied

by our Lord to His first chosen followers; and a survey of the manner in which they discharged

the duties thus solemnly assigned to them. In what sense Christ's kingdom is, and is not, of

this world. The use of the term “ Apostle " among the Jews. St. Paul the “ Apostle" of the

High Priest : way in which he exercised his office. The unlimited field of labour appertaining

to each of the Apostles of our Lord.-VIII. The foregoing view of the absence of all limit to

the field of Apostolic labour confirmed by the testimony of Scripture, especially with reference

to St. Peter, St. James, St. Paul, St. John, and St. Jude.--IX. Secular as well as ecclesiastical

Princes earnestly urged to use their influence for the restoration of the Apostolic office to its

primitive integrity and efficiency.-X. Rise of the usurpation of the Roman pontiff traceable to

the early departure of the ecclesiastical rulers from the Apostolic mode of regulating the affairs

of the Church Universal. Difference between the Primitive and Modern theories of episcopal

Church government. This diversity of practice unjustifiable.—XI. Causes and consequences

of the discontinuance of the Apostolic office. Parochiæ and dioceses. Bishops originally called

“ Apostles.” Reason for declining the appellation; and mischievous consequences attending its

discontinuance. Rise of Metropolitans.—XII. The Metropolitan order proved so unequal to

the task of removing the evils occasioned by the suspension of the Apostolic functions, that

recourse was at length had to General Councils, which were suggested by Provincial Councils.

--XIII. General Councils are found to be an insufficient substitute for the Apostolic office.

-This paved the way for the usurpation of the Bishop of Rome, who claimed an exclusive

right to an authority, which he could only share with every other Bishop of the Church

Universal. Causes which favoured the pretensions of the Bishop of Rome. --XIV. Extent of

the Romish usurpation, and noble insurgent spirit which that usurpation at length excited.

-Luther and the Reformation.-XV. Evils arising from injudicious efforts to overturn the

domination of Rome-Sectarianism, Deism, animosities between contending religious parties.-

XVI. Advantages of the Apostolic government. The Jewish Sanhedrim ambulatory after the

destruction of Jerusalem.-XVII. Remedy for the evil of suffering the Apostolic office of

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