Stars of the Earth, Or, Wild Flowers of the Months

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Johnstone Hunter, 1868 - 256 pages

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Page 189 - Spake full well, in language quaint and olden, One who dwelleth by the castled Rhine, When he called the flowers, so blue and golden, Stars, that in earth's firmament do shine.
Page 221 - Heaped in the hollows of the grove, the autumn leaves lie dead ; They rustle to the eddying gust, and to the rabbit's tread ; The robin and the wren are flown, and from the shrubs the jay, And from the wood-top calls the crow through all the gloomy day. Where are the flowers, the fair young...
Page 169 - Our outward life requires them not — Then wherefore had they birth ? — To minister delight to man, To beautify the earth ; To comfort man — to whisper hope, Whene'er his faith is dim, For who so careth for the flowers Will much more care for him ! Mary Howitt.
Page 7 - O READER ! hast thou ever stood to see The holly tree? The eye that contemplates it well, perceives Its glossy leaves Ordered by an intelligence so wise As might confound the atheist's sophistries. Below, a circling fence, its leaves are seen Wrinkled and keen; No grazing cattle, through their prickly round, Can reach to wound ; But as they grow where nothing is to fear, Smooth and unarmed the pointless leaves appear.
Page 6 - Confession of Faith (The) agreed upon at the Assembly of Divines at Westminster. Complete Edition, with the Italics of the elegant Quarto Edition of 1658 restored. (Authorised Edition.) Demy 12mo, cloth limp...
Page 156 - Though woodbines flaunt and roses glow O'er all the fragrant bowers, Thou need'st not be ashamed to show Thy satin-threaded flowers ; For dull the eye, the heart is dull, That cannot feel how fair, Amid all beauty beautiful, Thy tender blossoms are...
Page 140 - He causeth the grass to grow for the cattle, and herb for the service of man: that he may bring forth food out of the earth...
Page 77 - Now the bright morning star, day's harbinger, Comes dancing from the east, and leads with her The flowery May, who from her green lap throws The yellow cowslip, and the pale primrose. Hail bounteous May that dost inspire Mirth and youth, and warm desire; Woods and groves are of thy dressing, Hill and dale doth boast thy blessing. Thus we salute thee with our early song, And welcome thee, and wish thee long.
Page 103 - And of an humbler growth, the other tall, And throwing up into the darkest gloom Of neighbouring cypress or more sable yew Her silver globes, light as the foamy surf That the wind severs from the broken wave ; The lilac, various in array, now white, Now sanguine, and her beauteous head now set With purple spikes pyramidal, as if Studious of ornament, yet unresolved Which hue she most approved, she chose them all...
Page 7 - Hymns for the Use of Sabbath Schools and Bible Classes. Selected by a Committee of Clergymen. Royal 32mo, sewed, > 003 Jamie Wilson's Adventures.

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