The Little Speaker and Juvenile Reader: Being a Collection of Pieces in Prose, Poetry, and Dialogue, Designed for Exercises in Speaking, and for Occasional Reading, in Primary Schools

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Collins & Brother, 1867 - 162 pages

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Page 53 - And shouted but once more aloud, "My father! must I stay?" While o'er him fast, through sail and shroud, The wreathing fires made way. They...
Page 55 - To make the river flow. The clouds might give abundant rain, The nightly dews might fall, And the herb that keepeth life in man Might yet have drunk them all. Then wherefore, wherefore were they made, All dyed with...
Page 39 - The unwearied sun, from day to day, Does his Creator's power display, And publishes to every land The work of an Almighty hand. Soon as the evening shades prevail The moon takes up the wondrous tale, And nightly to the listening earth Repeats the story of her birth; Whilst all the stars that round her burn, And all the planets in their turn, Confirm the tidings as they roll And spread the truth from pole to pole.
Page 16 - No, no, no; said he cut down his apple-tree." " George's apple-tree ? " "No, no; his father's." "Oh!" "He said " "His father said?" "No, no, no; George said, 'Father, I cannot tell a lie. I did it with my little hatchet.
Page 56 - Then wherefore, wherefore were they made, All dyed with rainbow light, All fashioned with supremest grace Upspringing day and night, — Springing in valleys green and low, And on the mountains high, And in the silent wilderness Where no man passes by...
Page 31 - At last by starvation and famine made bold, All dripping with wet and all trembling with cold, Away he set off to a miserly ant, To see if, to keep him alive, he would grant Him shelter from rain...
Page 52 - Casablanca, a boy about thirteen years old, son to the admiral of the Orient, remained at his post (in the Battle of the Nile) after the ship had taken fire, and all the guns had been abandoned, and perished in the explosion of the vessel, when the flames had reached the powder.
Page 52 - The flame that lit the battle's wreck Shone round him o'er the dead. Yet beautiful and bright he stood, As born to rule the storm ; A creature of heroic blood, A proud, though childlike form. The flames rolled on, — he would not go Without his father's word ; That father, faint in death below, His voice no longer heard. He called aloud — " Say, father, say If yet my task is done ! " He knew not that the chieftain lay Unconscious of his son.
Page 40 - What though, in solemn silence, all Move round the dark terrestrial ball ; What though no real voice nor sound Amid their radiant orbs be found; In reason's ear they all rejoice, And utter forth a glorious voice, For ever singing as they shine, The hand that made us is divine.
Page 53 - While o'er him fast, through sail and shroud, The wreathing fires made way. They wrapt the ship in splendour wild, They caught the flag on high, And streamed above the gallant child, Like banners in the sky. There came a burst of thunder sound — The boy — oh ! where was he ? Ask of the winds that far around With fragments strewed the sea ! — With mast, and helm, and pennon fair, That well had borne their part — But the noblest thing which...

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