Presidents from Hayes Through McKinley: Debating the Issues in Pro and Con Primary Documents

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 2003 - 233 pages

This resource of primary documents and commentary spans the Hayes and McKinley administrations, selecting and describing five to ten of the foremost issues of the day. The actual texts of the presidents' positions, along with the opposing viewpoints, are presented. Helpful background information and commentary clarifies the primary sources, accurately depicting this dynamic time in the country's past and providing an invaluable resource to any student of American history.

The period from 1877 to 1901 marked the end of one United States-a country still reeling from the Civil War, a divided nation of Reconstruction, a land of economic depression, sectional hostility, and governmental corruption. A new United States was emerging. It was an empire, an international power that both negotiated with and fought against European nations with great success, and a country with a rebounding economy, vigorous industry, and restored faith. During this Gilded Age, the nation expanded as settlers moved west and displaced native populations. Immigrants entered at the highest rate in the country's history. Geographic expansion gave rise to mighty railroads, and industrial expansion brought corporations, company towns, and monopolies. This unprecedented industrialism bolstered urban growth, yet economic hardships afflicted rural countrysides. Labor and agrarian interests organized.

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Contents

Rutherford B Hayes 18771881
9
The Election of 1876
12
The New Departure
18
Resumption
24
Civil Service Reform
29
Strikes
34
The Indian Problem
40
The BlandAllison Act
45
Recommended Readings
130
Benjamin Harrison 18891893
131
AntiTrust
133
Silver
139
The Tariff
145
Annexation of Hawaii
151
Recommended Readings
157
Grover Cleveland 18931897
159

Recommended Readings
51
James A Garfield 1881
53
Civil Service Reform
55
Resumption
62
Race in the South
67
Recommended Readings
74
Chester A Arthur 18811885
75
Mormon Polygamy
77
The Chinese Exclusion Act
83
Internal Improvements
89
Allotment
95
Recommended Readings
101
Grover Cleveland 18851889
103
Legitimacy of US Government
106
The Gold Standard
112
Civil War Pensions
118
The Tariff
124
The Pullman Strike
161
The Gold Standard
166
Venezuela
173
Cuba
179
Recommended Readings
186
William McKinley 18971901
187
The Gold Standard
190
The Cuban Revolution
196
The SpanishAmerican War
202
Annexation of Hawaii
208
Open Door Policy
214
The Philippines
219
Recommended Readings
225
Bibliography
227
Index
231
Copyright

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Page 206 - In view of these facts and of these considerations I ask the Congress to authorize and empower the President to take measures to secure a full and final termination of hostilities between the Government of Spain and the people of Cuba...
Page 98 - States does and will hold the land thus allotted, for the period of twenty-five years, in trust for the sole use and benefit of the Indian to whom such allotment shall have been made, or, in case of his decease, of his heirs...
Page 98 - And every Indian born within the territorial limits of the United States to whom allotments shall have been made under the provisions of this act, or under any law or treaty, and every Indian born within the territorial limits of the United States...
Page 45 - No one knows where they are— perhaps freezing to death. I want to have time to look for my children, and see how many of them I can find. Maybe I shall find them among the dead. Hear me, my chiefs! I am tired. My heart is sick and sad. From where the sun now stands I will fight no more forever.
Page 98 - That in all cases where any tribe or band of Indians has been, or shall hereafter be, located upon any reservation created for their use, either by treaty stipulation or by virtue of an Act of Congress or executive order setting apart the same for their use...
Page 47 - January 18, 1837, on which shall be the devices and superscriptions provided by said act ; which coins, together with all silver dollars heretofore coined by the United States, of like weight and fineness, shall be a legal tender, at their nominal value, for all debts and dues, public and private, except where otherwise expressly stipulated in the contract.
Page 174 - ... why, to that extent, such European power does not thereby attempt to extend its system of government to that portion of this continent which is thus taken. This is the precise action which President Monroe declared to be " dangerous to our peace and safety...
Page 36 - Provided always, that whenever it may be necessary in the judgment of the president to use the military force hereby directed to be called forth, the president shall forthwith, and previous thereto, by proclamation, command such insurgents to disperse, and retire peaceably to their respective abodes within a limited time...
Page 195 - You come to us and tell us that the great cities are in favor of the gold standard; we reply that the great cities rest upon our broad and fertile prairies. Burn down your cities and leave our farms, and your cities will spring up again as if by magic; but destroy our farms and the grass will grow in the streets of every city in the country.
Page 90 - An Act making appropriations for the construction, repair, and preservation of certain public works on rivers and harbors, and for other purposes...

About the author (2003)

AMY H. STURGIS teaches at Belmont University. She is the author of two books in the President's Position: Debating the Issues series.

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