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PEANUT OIL TO DISPLACE LARD?

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THE CUT VINES AS THEY APPEAR STACKED.

with peanuts, or by planting the peanuts first and following with fall oats.

Not only are the Spanish and Brazilian nuts valuable as oil producers, however ; from them the manufacturer also obtains valuable by-products. There is a good market for the cake after the oil is pressed out. Its value is greater than cotton-seed cake and there is a wide market in Europe for it. The vine makes an excellent hay, and the tables of the agricultural department show it to be one of the most valuable of the stock foods grown in this country.

Twenty years ago the cotton-seed oil industry was in its infancy. Today cotton-seed and its products furnish a considerable portion of the value of the staple itself. Twenty years ago the farmer saved what seeds were necessary to plant the next year and threw the rest into his fields as fertilizer. The peanut can be raised on poor, sandy soil, and many think that in a few years the cutover pine lands will be covered with great fields of Spanish and Brazilian nuts, from which will be made the cooking oils of the nation.

It is already proved that the nuts can be grown all over the South, and another bulletin issued by the de

AREA ADAPTED TO THE PRODUCTION OF PEANUTS. partment of agriculture, From map prepared by the United States Department of Agriculture, says:

“The demand for peanuts as a human field culture of the crop. An acre of food is constantly increasing. There are first-class peanuts, calculating the yield thousands of acres of waste lands in the at a ton of vines, worth from eight to Southern states that would produce ten dollars, and sixty bushels of peas enough peanuts to keep the oil mills run- worth from forty to sixty dollars, will ning and furnish more than enough oil give an income of from forty-eight to for home consumption.”

seventy dollars. The cost of growing an “The peanut vines, after the removal acre of peanuts is variously estimated at of all the first-class peas, have a feeding from twelve to twenty-five dollars, invalue practically equal to the cost of the cluding seed and fertilizers. These

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WIRELESS TELEPHONE FOR

EVERYBODY

By

WILLIAM T. PROSSER

WIRELESS telephone outfit ment can accomplish wonders for the

in a suit-case-or in any other individual user. Wherever sufficient curconvenient carrying recep- rent is available for lights, there the little tacle—complete, and requiring wireless set may be put readily to work

only connection at any ordi for communication over areas of tracknary electric-light socket to make it less forest, desert or sea. That it will be capable of operating over a distance of the means of saving lives, when nothing fifty miles, is the latest product of inven- else will avail is at once apparent. That tion in this wonderful field.

it will be invaluable in new country, To William Dubilier, a California ahead of the wires or the regular wireless youth of twenty-two years, belongs credit installations, in military activities, and in for perfecting an instrument to such a all times and places where ordinary degree of nicety that it is of readily means of message-sending are interportable bulk and yet of high efficiency. rupted or unestablished is easily recogWith a range of something like three nizable. hundred keys and escaping many of the Young Dubilier, inventor and electrical problems of interference, such an instru

engineer, has made a specialty of the

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WILLIAM DUBILIER TALKING FROM SEATTLE TO TACOMA. A DISTANCE OF THIRTY

FIVE MILES, OVER HIS WIRELESS TELEPHONE.

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THE SIMPLIFIED TRANSMITTER AND OSCILLATOR OF

THE DUBILIER WIRELESS TELEPHONE SYSTEM.

be able to supply wireless telephone

them so cheaply in and his success in

large lots that they this specialty has

may be used exattracted wide at

tensively in cities, tention. Most of his

much more cheaply experiments have

in rural commubeen carried on in

nities than the presSeattle. He is a

ent wire systems, product of Cooper

for marine and Institute, New

coastwise work, York, where he

and for special uses studied while sup

such as by forest porting himself by

rangers on the hard work. So he

great reservations deserves, every bit,

of the Rock y the harvest he is

Mountains and Pareaping now. His

cific Coast. achievement is the

“The machines result of scientific

will be of particumethod and close

lar advantage in application through

sparsely settled disa long period of

tricts, as in the experimentation

gold-camps of and, despite his

Alaska. Prospectyouth he has won a

ors within a radius veritable triumph.

of thirty or forty

miles of civilizastruments are not

tion, for instance, noticeably different

will be enabled by in principle from the wireless telephone the use of one of these light sets to keep devices of the past, but they are compact. in continual touch with what is going on, Instead of great coils of wire and oscil- and undoubtedly many lives will be saved lators as big as a dining-room table, the by the practical application of the Dubilier apparatus is reduced to mar- device.”

isly small dimensions, while any Wireless, and especially the wireless commercial lighting circuit gives all the telephone, has been what might almost power that is necessary.

be called an obsession with young Mr. Dubilier is not particularly keen Dubilier ever since he was old enough to in exploiting his invention, his explana- know anything about the subject at all. tion being as compact as his instruments. Born in New York in 1888 he received. He merely says that the electric light his early education in the public schools. current passing through the new type of His parents were not able to keep him in oscillator is rendered into electrical school through the high school course, waves to the number of 100,000 a second and he left high school to secure employand that these affect instruments attuned ment. He saved his money, and later, to the same key within a wide radius. by doing odd jobs through the course, Simple, isn't it?

gave himself the benefit of three years “Influential men believe in my inven- study of electrical engineering. tion as much as I do, and we plan to It was in 1904 that he began his own build a factory and manufacture my experimenting with the wireless telemachines upon a large scale," said Mr. phone, and after many disappointinents Dubilier in Seattle recently. “This will and discouragements he perfected one of be, I believe, the first wireless telephone the first pieces of apparatus of that kind. factory ever opened in America-or the Graduating from his technical course at world, for that matter. The machines the age of eighteen he became an inare not costly to turn out, and we will spector for the Western Electric Com

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