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THE MOST ELABORATE ORNAMENTS CAN BE APPLIED IN AN ECONOMICAL MANNER.

When the cement has set and the wall is paris cast is taken and from the latter is being tilted upright the dry sand simply made a gelatine mould, which hardens to runs out, leaving the dead air space a rubber-like consistency. When this is which is not a conductor of heat or cold. stripped off, cement can be poured into

So much for the utility of the system. the gelatine which retains every detail of From the aesthetic standpoint quite as the original clay model. As soon as the much has been accomplished, as it has cement is hard enough the gelatine can been demonstrated that an inexpensive be taken off and used again and again factory building can be made as hand until all the sections of the frieze have some as an art museum or an exposition been completed. If the gelatine mould hall. The most elaborate ornaments can shows wear after a number of pourings, be applied in an economical manner. The a new one can be easily prepared. method of preparing the cement orna All these ornamental details are reinments is very ingenious. First a model forced with projecting rods, and when is made in clay from the artist's sketch. the façade of the building is to be poured, We will suppose it to be a decorative the frieze, capitals, etc., are placed on the frieze to extend the length of the build form before the pouring; the reinforceing. From this clay model a plaster ments holding them in place.

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CEMENT PROTECTS IRON PIPE to adhere firmly to the surface. Then

the cement is applied to a thickness of ALAYER of cement is applied to iron about an inch by means of a cement gun,

water pipe in order to preserve it an apparatus that blows a spray of water from injurious effects of moisture and and a mixture of sand and cement, the chemicals in the soil. The method is ingredients combining at the nozzle and shown in the accompanying photographs, striking the surface of the pipe with which give a good idea of the process. great force. The result is a very hard First the pipes are enclosed in a web of protecting surface, which adds greatly to fencing wire, which causes the cement the life of the water or gas main so

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THE PIPE IS FIRST PREPARED WITH LIGHT FENCE-WIRE NETTING.

treated. It is claimed that old pipe which has been dug up can be coated with cement by this method and used again, unless, of course, it has deteriorated to a great extent. The two pictures here shown were taken in southern California, where pipes are being prepared for use near San Diego.

The use of concrete in this connection, is another triumph of this material over the ordinary materials that have hitherto held full sway in this sort of construction work. It would seem to sound the doom of the old.

CEREMONIAL MOUSTACHE LIFTERS USED BY THE HAIRY

AINU, THE MYSTERIOUS ABORIGINALS OF JAPAN. These sticks keep clean the flowing beard of one while

drinking.

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HOW FRESH PICKED CHOCOLATE BEANS ARE HANDLED PREPARATORY TO THE

MANUFACTURING PROCESS.
First washed in water, the chocolate beans are allowed to ferment in the sun.

ONE-ARMED ORCHESTRA long, he was in communication with not

only one but several who had lost arms THERE is an orchestra in Portland, and were of musical temperament or

Oregon, which is composed exclus- training. ively of one-armed men. In spite of their Eight members compose the orchestra, physical shortcoming, these determined, seven with their right arms gone, but enthusiastic young men are making a the eighth, Mr. Lester Cox, is minus the practical success out of their association. left. It is a peculiar fact that every

The idea of this orchestra originated member lost his arm through service in with B. R. Amend, a musician. The loss the mills of Oregon and Washington! of his arm did not induce him to despair The orchestra, sensibly, does not go of somehow making an honorable com in for classical music, but strives its best petence. He set his wits at work and to render popular and dance music—the conceived the idea that he could not be kind the people most appreciate and for the only musician in the world with one which there is ten times the demand. arm. He began to scour the city of Mr. Amend, handicapped as he is, furPortland and the State of Oregon. Ere nishes a show in himself, as he dexter

ously and with at times, marvelous skill manages to keep the piano going in time and tune with the instruments about him. It is hard enough to accompany an orchestra when the pianist has two hands and clever musical ability. What must it be when a chap has but one hand with which to manipulate the bass and high keys ?

Probably the most difficult and sensational feature of the concerts and entertainments is the stunt performed by Messrs. Amend and Tienken. They give

a guitar solo, both playing on one instruAN ORCHESTRA MADE UP EXCLUSIVELY OF ONEARMED MEN. ment.

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ELECTRICAL TOWING AT THE MOUTH OF THE RIVER WESER.

MILK DELIVERED BY WIRE THE 'HE owner of a small dairy out west

got tired carrying the heavy cans of milk from his milking sheds to the creamery, and as the latter building was only about three hundred feet distant and on

a lower level he devised the aerial milk carrier shown in the photograph. The full cans are carried above a county road, but as that is on a lower grade than the land on both sides it does not interfere with traffic. The little trolley, carrying a twenty gallon can, is run to the creamery by gravity while the empty cans are hauled back very easily by rope.

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Next Month's Features-See Next Page

Technical World Magazine

HENRY M. HYDE, Editor

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Contents for July, 1912
Cover Design-Lejaren Hiller

PAGE
Irrigation Frauds in Ten States

Randall R. Howard 504 Trading a City for a Tunnel

Henry M. Hyde 515 State Road from a Private Purse

Bailey Millard 524 Making Steam Work Harder. Charles Frederick Carter 539 Doubling the Diver's Reach

Henry Gardiner 544 Thirty Thousand Dollars a Year from Twelve Acres .

Stanley L. McMichael 547 Forcing Health Upon a Town Arthur St. George Joyce 554 Moving a Railroad Six Thousand Miles . René Bache 558 New Black Magic Finds Water . Richard Hamilton Byrd 562 Legislature Called to Fight Tiny Fly, Charlton Lawrence Edholm 564 Feeling the Skyscraper's Pulse

Gardner Hunting 570 A Living from an Acre

Alice Spencer Geddes 574 When the Storm Centers Get Lost . William Thornton Prosser 578 Building with Concrete Against Winter's Cold

Edward I. Pratt 582 Every Householder His Own Gas Company . Robert Franklin 585 Popular Science and Mechanics Supplement

598

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Technical World Magazine should be on the news-stands on the 17th of the month preceding the date of issue. Patrons unable to get the magazine on the 17th will confer a favor by notifying the Circulation Manager., News-stand patrons should instruct their News-dealer to reserve their copy of Technical World, otherwise they are likely to find the magazine "sold out,

TERMS: $1.50 a year: 75 cents for six months: 15 cents a copy. Foreign postage, $1.00 additional; Canadian postage, 50 cents additional. Notice of change of address should be given thirty days in advance to avoid missing a number.

TECHNICAL WORLD COMPANY
Home Office: 58th St, and Drexel Avenue, Chicago

Eastern Office: 1702 Flatiron Building. New York

Copyright, 1912, by Technical World Company

Entered at the Postoffice, Chicago, III., a second-class mail matter

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