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Recognizing these objectives we have raised six questions that affect tuition policy and must be asked. These are:

What are our present students willing to pay and what is their attitude about tuition at FCC?

What can our present students afford to pay?

What options for education are open to our students at other local institutions ?

What would students pay for a comparable education at other local public community institutions ?

To what extent have other comparable institutions increased their tuition over the past year?

What are the sociological and educational benefits derived through open admissions—tuition free policy? Current status of this activity is as follows: Questions 1, and 2, are being asked in a student tuition for the U.S. and Mid-eastern states are shown below:

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1 Mideast consists of six states-Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania To minimize problems of national or regional variability and maintain some sense of comparability, changes in tuition at five local institutions were examined. On average, tuition has increased 21% at the three colleges in the community, WTI and DCTC have not increased their tuition. Northern Virginia Community College increased its tuition by 33%.

What are the expected advantages of supporting a low tuition ? Peckman has noted that “a system which provides free, or almost free, access to a public institution of higher learning to all qualified students is the simplest and most effective method of ensuring enrollment of qualified poor and nearly poor students.'

." ? Recognizing that the average family income of our students is approximately $5,700 per year and that nearly 72% of our students are working and already burdened with critical financial responsibilities, it appears prudent to proceed with caution in raising tuition appreciably.

2

COMMUNITY CENTERS

Mr. CABELL. In your testimony, Mr. Mayor, you indicated that you were not going to start any new programs but trying to keep up with the ongoing ones. Yet the radio this morning stated that work is going to begin on a series of community centers and upon completion this would be the only city of any consequence in the nation with such a facility.

Is there anything to that?
Mr. WASHINGTON. I didn't hear the report.

Mr. CABELL. The question is, what about these community centers that are being initiated? What do they comprise?

Mr. WASHINGTON. I don't really know. Are you sure that was not Axexandria? I heard somebody ask me this morning about some community centers being developed in Alexandria but

Mr. CABELL. It is questionable our press would ever make a mistake like that.

Mr. ALEXANDER. I have not heard the piece that you are talking about. It is possible that the reporter, editor, or what have you, may

TABLE III.--THE COST OF ATTENDING FCC COMPARED WITH THE COST OF ATTENDING COMMUNITY COLLEGES IN THE D.C. METROPOLITAN AREA

(Annual and quarterly costs in dollars!

Federal City College

Northern Virginia Community

College

Prince Georges Community

College

Montgomery Junior College

А

B

A

B

A

B

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75 14 100

180

0 100

300

20 100

100

100 2440-2800

50 175-350

6 140

75
14
100
2 435

50
175-350

175
10 175

180

0
100
3 700

50
175-350
• 175
uo

6 38

300

20

100
* 2440–2800

50
175-350

175
11 0

50 175_-350

140

175-350

. 140

6 38 175–350

6 140

175-350 • 175 110

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Cost Elements

Tuition.
Activity Fees.
Textbooks.
Day Care or Baby-Sitter.
Health Service or Insurance
Food (Lunch)?
Transportation.
Parking
Total:
Year:

AVG.

RANGE.
Qtr.:

AVG.
RANGE

592
504_679

1 Not available.
a $12.50/week at Early Childhood Learning Center,
3 $20 per week at school.
* Babysitter $1.75 to $2.00 per hour X8 hours per day X175 days per year.
5 Free infirmary.
• Insurance option.

I Lunch average $1.00 to $2.00 per day x175 days per academic year.
& Bus-404 per trip X2 trips per day x175 days per year.
• 10 miles per day X10€ per milex175 days per year.
10 $1.00 per day x175 days per year.
u Free parking available.

Recognizing these objectives we have raised six questions that affect tuition policy and must be asked. These are:

What are our present students willing to pay and what is their attitude about tuition at FCC?

What can our present students afford to pay?

What options for education are open to our students at other local institutions ?

What would students pay for a comparable education at other local public community institutions ?

To what extent have other comparable institutions increased their tuition over the past year?

What are the sociological and educational benefits derived through open admissions—tuition free policy? Current status of this activity is as follows: Questions 1, and 2, are being asked in a student tuition for the U.S. and Mid-eastern states are shown below:

[blocks in formation]

1 Mideast consists of six states—Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania To minimize problems of national or regional variability and maintain some sense of comparability, changes in tuition at five local institutions were examined. On average, tuítion has increased 21% at the three colleges in the community. WTI and DCTC have not increased their tuition. Northern Virginia Community College increased its tuition by 33%.

What are the expected advantages of supporting a low tuition ? Peckman has noted that “a system which provides free, or almost free, access to a public institution of higher learning to all qualified students is the simplest and most effective method of ensuring enrollment of qualified poor and nearly poor students." Recognizing that the average family income of our students is approximately $5,700 per year and that nearly 72% of our students are working and already burdened with critical financial responsibilities, it appears prudent to proceed with caution in raising tuition appreciably.

COMMUNITY CENTERS

Mr. CABELL. In your testimony, Mr. Mayor, you indicated that you were not going to start any new programs but trying to keep up with the ongoing ones. Yet the radio this morning stated that work is going to begin on a series of community centers and upon completion this would be the only city of any consequence in the nation with such a facility.

Is there anything to that?
Mr. WASHINGTON. I didn't hear the report.

Mr. CABELL. The question is, what about these community centers that are being initiated? What do they comprise?

Mr. WASHINGTON. I don't really know. Are you sure that was not Axexandria? I heard somebody ask me this morning about some community centers being developed in Alexandria but

Mr. CABELL. It is questionable our press would ever make a mistake like that.

Mr. ALEXANDER. I have not heard the piece that you are talking about. It is possible that the reporter, editor, or what have you, may

have been talking about this in context that we have a number of grant programs, one from HUD for a facility in the service area such as the Model Neighborhood, which means a community center out there. HUD makes it available under the Neighborhood Facilities Act money over the years. One or two projects a year for community facilities in various areas of the city throughout the nation.

There is a possibility of this kind of money being available. There is no specific built-in amount of money being provided now for establishment of those kinds of centers throughout the city. No appropriation.

Mr. WASHINGTON. I can assure you there is no appropriated funds, Mr. Chairman, involved in this budget that will be involved in community centers, whatever that report was.

(Subsequently, the following information was furnished the committee:)

INFORMATION ON COMMUNITY CENTERS IN THE DISTRICT The following material summarizes the major Community Center development efforts in the District of Columbia for which Federal grant-in-aids and/or appropriations have been committed.

Three facilities are funded under the HUD Neighborhood Facilities 703 grant program.

Three facilities are to be constructed as an integral part of 3 new Schools and are funded under Board of Education appropriations.

One facility is funded under the Model Cities Program.

One facility is funded by HUD through the National Capital Housing Authority under its modernization program.

The purpose of all these Centers is to provide at the neighborhood level, efficient, coordinated, and responsive services which meet the needs of communities with extensive social, economic and physical problems.

I. There is one Center currently in operation which is located in a interim facility at the old Notre Dame Convent, 941 North Capitol St. N. W. It is named Community Facilities Center No. I. The building is owned by the Redevelopment Land Agency. It is occupied by District and private agencies under an agreement with RLA. The site is scheduled for redevelopment under the N.E. No. I urban renewal plan. When this occurs the Center's program of services will be transferred to a HUD 703 facility described in II below.

By agreement with the District Government, the Center is administered by the People's Involvement Corporation (PIC) a delegate community action agency, established under the Federal Neighbornood Services Program and funded by OEO and other federal grant-in-aids.

The Center has Community Advisory Council which establishes general policy on programs and operations. It provides a forum for community development of the Center and the service area.

The Office of Community Services performs a liaison and coordinating role for the District.

The programs in the Center include a U.S. Public Health Services Clinic; a Social Service Program providing public welfare services food stamps; mental health guidance and vocational rehabilitation services under the aegis of the Department of Human Resources, the D.C. Manpower Administration provides job placement services; RLA conducts a Home Economic program; the local Catholic Church, a food aid program; Alcoholics Anonnymous has a chapter at the Center; a Clothing, and Family Budget Planning program are conducted by local groups; the Family and Child Services Agency provides family counselling and social service guidance for families facing crisis situations.

II. The Department of Housing and Urban Development approved in 1970, a $1,300,000 Neighborhood Facilities 703 grant award to the District for two facilities: (1) the acquisition and renovation of the “Bond" property located at Georgia Avenue and V Street, N.W. in the lower Cardoza area and (2) the construction of a Community Services Center as an integral part of the modernization program for the Walker-Jones Elementary School at First and L Streets, N.W. in the N.W. No. 1 Urban Renewal Area. The required local match was provided by earlier congressional appropriation. The program of services now operating at Community Facilities Center No. 1 and described above, will be transferred to

the new Walker-Jones Facility when completed. Both Centers will be administered by the People's Involvement Corporation (PIC) under an agreement with the District Government.

III. Under the Model Cities Program, a $160,500 grant has been approved for the operation of a small neighborhood center in rented quarters to meet the service needs of the Stanton Park-Trinidad Region of the Model Area. The current plan is for the Department of Human Resources to use the grant for the Administration of the Center and to establish a model outreach, intake, referral and follow-up service.

IV. HUD will announce in the near future the reservation of $440,000 to construct a Neighborhood Multi-Service Center for the public housing community known as Arthur Capper which is located in the vicinity of 5th and K Streets, S.E. The local match requirement is met by the value of the land site transferred to the D.C. by the National Park Service.

V. Under the D-HUD Public Housing Modernization Program, the National Capital Housing Authority received a grant of $297,000 to construct a Community Center for the Lincoln-Height-Richardson public housing communities, located at 50th and Eads Streets, in the Far Northeast. Community representatives have worked out their service priorities for the development of the Center.

Concurrently, the NCH A is negotiating with D-HUD on behalf of the Health Services Administration for an administrative loan of approximately $178,000 to construct on a lease-purchase basis a Health Clinic for the Lincoln-HeightsRichardson community center program.

VI. The D.C. School Board has an authorized appropriation of $8.5 million for the construction of a new School-Community Center in the Highland public housing area, at 8th and Yuma Sts. S.E. (PN-10–222) The program of special services will include day care, social, health and manpower services, skill workshops and the like.

VII. A second major School-Community Center is authorized for the Shaw-Jr. High School replacement, at 8th and Rhode Island Ave. N.W. at a cost of $11,900,000. This facility will also provide a wide roster of public and private services as well as community-use areas in the School.

VIII. A third major School-Community Center is authorized for the replacement at the old Morgan Elementary School, at a budgeted cost of $9.0 million. This Community-School will also provide an integrated program of educational, public and private services to meet needs in the Adams-Morgan Community.

Source: D.C. Government, Office of Community Services, July 1971.

(Reprint from the Washington Post, July 23, 1971)

BRANCH CITY HALL SET FOR SE AREA

(By Richard E. Prince) The District of Columbia has been given $650,000 in federal funds to build a branch city hall to serve residents of the Arthur Capper Housing Project in Southeast Washington.

The building, more formally disignated as a community service center, will offer a wide range of legal, welfare, parole, recreation and other city services, according to Mayor Walter E. Washington. The mayor, along with officials of the U.S. Departments of Interior and Housing and Urban Development announced the grant at the public housing site yesterday.

A recreation area, requiring the closing of two city blocks, will cost $50,000, and part of it is planned to be completed by the end of this summer. The $600,000 service center is scheduled for completion by March, 1974.

John A. Nevius, who was the GOP candidate for congressional delegate, represented HUD at the ceremony. He is now deputy assistant secretary for community development.

The mayor, who was warmly greeted by the 500 persons at the ceremony, had worked for the center since 1964, when he was director of the National Capital Housing Authority. Washington had called the project "by all standards one of the most desperate, impoverished and problem-filled areas of Washington, D.C.”

Also interested in the project was Mrs. Lyndon B. Johnson, whose Committee for A More Beautiful Capitol was eager to start a plaza in the area.

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