Visits and Sketches at Home and Abroad: With Tales and Miscellanies Now First Collected, and a New Edition of the "Diary of an Ennuyée.", Volumes 3-4

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Saunders and Otley, 1834

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Page 242 - I remember the strange emotion which came across me, when — on the horses stopping to breathe on the summit of a lofty ridge, where all around, as far as the eye could reach, nothing was to be seen but the same unvarying, miserable...
Page 121 - Even be it so ; yet still among your tribe, Our daily world's true Worldlings, rank not me ! Children are blest, and powerful; their world lies More justly balanced ; partly at their feet, And part far from them : sweetest melodies Are those that are by distance made more sweet; Whose mind is but the mind of his own eyes, He is a slave; the meanest we can meet!
Page 284 - Ah! Then, if mine had been the Painter's hand, To express what then I saw, and add the gleam, The light that never was, on sea or land, The consecration, and the Poet's dream; I would have planted thee, thou hoary Pile Amid a world how different from this!
Page 214 - Think you, if Laura had been Petrarch's wife, He would have written sonnets all his life?
Page 105 - Like one, that on a lonesome road Doth walk in fear and dread, And having once turned round walks on, And turns no more his head ; Because he knows, a frightful fiend Doth close behind him tread.
Page 302 - Though I should gaze for ever On that green light that lingers in the west: I may not hope from outward forms to win The passion and the life, whose fountains are within.
Page 206 - Yes! when the sun of life more feebly shines, Becoming thoughts, I trust, of solemn gloom Or of high gladness you shall hither bring; And these perennial bowers and murmuring pines Be gracious as the music and the bloom And all the mighty ravishment of Spring.
Page 7 - And daily lose what I desire to keep : Yet rather would I instantly decline To the traditionary sympathies Of a most rustic ignorance, and take A fearful apprehension from the owl Or death-watch : and as readily rejoice, If two auspicious magpies crossed my way ; — To this would rather bend than see and hear The repetitions wearisome of sense, Where soul is dead, and feeling hath no place...
Page 142 - Take ye no thought what ye shall eat, or what ye shall drink, or what ye shall put on" and, I dare say, it was listened to with singular edification.
Page 189 - By words, nor by the pencil's silent skill; But is the property of him alone Who hath beheld it, noted it with care, And in his mind recorded it with love!

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