Science, Technology, and National Socialism

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Monika Renneberg, Mark Walker
Cambridge University Press, 2003 M09 25 - 444 pages
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This book provides a survey of the development of scientific disciplines and technical projects under National Socialism in Germany. Each contribution addresses a different, new aspect which is important for judging the interaction between science, technology and National Socialism. In particular, the personal conduct of individual scientists and engineers as well as the functionality of certain the ones and projects are examined. All essays share a common theme: continuity and discontinuity. All authors cover a period that reaches back to the Weimar Republic and forward beyond the end of National Socialism to the post-war period. This unanimity of approach provides answers to major questions about the nature of Hitler's regime and about possible lines of continuity in science and technology which may transcend political upheaval. The book is also the most comprehensive to date on this subject, and includes essays on engineering, geography, biology, psychology, physics, mathematics, and science policy. It thus offers something of interest for the specialist, engineer and historian as well as an unprecedented overview of science and technology before, during and after the Third Reich.
 

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Contents

Scientists Engineers and National Socialism
1
German Armaments Engineers
30
Peenemünde
51
Selfmobilization or Resistance? Aeronautical Research
72
Military Technology and National Socialist Ideology
88
Area Research and Spatial Planning from the Weimar
126
The Ideological Origins of Institutes at the Kaiser
139
Scientific and Political
197
Quantum Mechanics Psychology
224
An
255
The Minerva Project The Accelerator Laboratory at
271
The Social System of Mathematics and National
291
The Problem of antiFascist Resistance of Apolitical
312
Notes
339
Index
415
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About the author (2003)

Mark Walker is an associate professor in molecular genetics.

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