History of Woman Suffrage: 1876-1885

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Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan Brownell Anthony, Matilda Joslyn Gage, Ida Husted Harper
Susan B. Anthony, 1887 - 1054 pages
The third and final volume of the History of Woman Suffrage.

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this is the "bible" of the women's suffrage campaign. really can't say enough about it. it's very interesting and informative reading; not boring at all. one of the best things about it is that it is a compilation of first person accounts, so there is no worry about "revisionist history." it should be required reading in public schools and universities nationwide. women today, young and old, can take inspiration in seeing the incredible adversity and ignorance that these women were up against, and that they persevered and prevailed.  

Contents

I
1
II
57
III
150
IV
198
V
265
VI
316
VII
339
VIII
351
XVIII
594
XIX
610
XX
636
XXI
647
XXII
660
XXIII
668
XXIV
694
XXV
710

IX
367
X
383
XI
395
XII
444
XIII
476
XIV
491
XV
513
XVI
533
XVII
559
XXVI
724
XXVII
747
XXVIII
765
XXIX
787
XXX
806
XXXII
829
XXXIII
893
XXXIV
920

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Page 163 - All persons within the jurisdiction of the United States shall have the same right in every State and Territory to make and enforce contracts, to sue, be parties, give evidence, and to the full and equal benefit of all laws and proceedings for the security of persons and property as is enjoyed by white citizens, and shall be subject to like punishment, pains, penalties, taxes, licenses, and exactions of every kind, and to no other.
Page 233 - ... immediate admission to all the rights and privileges which belong to them as citizens of the United States.
Page 75 - Resolved, by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, (two-thirds of both houses concurring) : That the following article be proposed to the legislatures of the several States as an Amendment to the Constitution of the United States...
Page 333 - Against the peace and dignity of the same." 27. There shall be elected in each county in this state, in such districts as the general assembly may direct, by the qualified electors thereof, a competent number of justices of the peace, who shall hold their offices for the term of four years, and until their successors shall have been elected and qualified, and who shall perform such duties, receive such compensation, and exercise such jurisdiction, as may be prescribed by law.
Page 277 - The republican party is mindful of its obligations to the loyal women of America for their noble devotion to the cause of freedom. Their admission to wider fields of usefulness is viewed with satisfaction , and the honest demand of any class of citizens for additional rights should be treated with respectful consideration.
Page 163 - That all persons born in the United States and not subject to any foreign power, excluding Indians not taxed, are hereby declared to be citizens of the United States...
Page 558 - everywhere Two heads in council, two beside the hearth, Two in the tangled business of the world, Two in the liberal offices of life, Two plummets dropt for one to sound the abyss Of science, and the secrets of the mind: Musician, painter, sculptor, critic, more : And everywhere the broad and bounteous Earth Should bear a double growth of those rare souls, Poets, whose thoughts enrich the blood of the world.
Page 183 - We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men and women are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; that to secure these rights governments are instituted, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.
Page 233 - Resolved, That it is the duty of the women of this country to secure to themselves their sacred right to the elective franchise.
Page 48 - If children are to be educated to understand the true principle of patriotism, their mother must be a patriot; and the love of mankind, from which an orderly train of virtues spring, can only be produced by considering the moral and civil interest of mankind; but the education and situation of woman, at present, shuts her out from such investigations.

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