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There are many oysters, land crabs and turtles. The alligator and the juba, a venomous reptile about six feet long, are common in the marshy region of the island.

There are several poisonous spiders, twelve varieties of mosquitoes, many kinds of flies, 300 varieties of butterfly. The scorpion and tarantula are indigenous to this island.

SUMMARY The characteristics of these people give ample evidence of distinct nationality. The question now to be decided is whether the intellectual development of the masses will enable them to judiciously govern themselves. Their struggle for independence has been a long one and it is to be earnestly hoped that their longed for hopes will be realized and that they have learned moderation in their pursuit for greatness.

THE CONGRESS OF THE

THE UNITED STATES

IMPORTANT POINTS IN THE PRESIDENT'S

MESSAGE.

The President in his message to the Fifty-sixth Congress suggests for consideration the following pertinent issues : 1. The Currency question embracing:

I. The currency standard.

II. The National Banking system. 2. Our Merchant Marine. 3. Regulations of the Trusts. 4. Our Foreign relations. 5. Our Relations with South and Central America. 6. The Nicaraguan canal. 7. The Chinese situation. 8. Paris Exposition. 9. Germany and Great Britain. IO. Anglo-American commissi II. Our position in the Boer war. 12. Protection of aliens. 13. Commercial treaties. 14. The proposed Pacific cable. 15. Affairs of Mexico. 16. Bering Sea claims. 17. Partition of Samoa. 18. Future of Cuba. 19. Spanish relations. 20. Claims against Turkey. 21. Revolt in Venezuela. 22. Conventions of reciprocity. 23. Pan-American exposition. 24. Peace conference at the Hague.

25. The volunteer soldiers.
26. Increase of the army.
27. Growth of the Postal service.
28. Needs of the Navy.
29. Army and Navy pensions.
30. Indians and census work.
31. Railroad debts.
32. Protection of forests.
33. Markets for farm products.
34. War in the Philippines.
35. Government of the Island of Negros.
36. Government of the Sulu Islands.
37. Retention of the Islands.
38. Legislation for Hawaii.
39. Legislation for Alaska.
40. Form of Government in Puerto Rico.
41. Lynching
42. Bridge over the Potomac.
43. Civil service classification; and closes by saying:

Presented to this Congress are great opportunities. With them come great responsibilities. The power confided to us increases the weight of our obligations to the people, and we must be profoundly sensitive of them as we contemplate the new and grave problems which confront us. Aiming only at the public good, we cannot err. A right interpretation of the people's will and of duty cannot fail to insure wise measures for the welfare of the islands which have come under the authority of the United States and inure to the common interest and lasting honor of our country. Never has this nation had more abundant cause than during the last year for thankfulness to God for manifold blessings and mercies, for which we make reverent acknowledgment.

WILLIAM MCKINLEY. Executive Mansion, Dec. 5, 1899.

THE 56TH CONGRESS, 1ST SESSION.

THE

HE Congress of the United States is the law making depart

ment of our government. It consists of a Senate and House of Representatives.

It devolves upon this body of statesmen to enact the laws which shall govern our great body politic. It is no wonder, therefore, that such stirring scenes of seeming discord occur when nearly four hundred men coming from various parts of our broad country with different opinions and influenced by different environments, sit together to make laws to govern properly, our people, in all climes and in every condition of life. We in civil life often murmur, at what seems to us prolonged, useless discussions; yet when we stop to think of the circumstances governing each of our members in this body, we are forced to admit that each member of this great representative body is acting to perform the will of his constituents, who are perhaps totally unlike.

The following will give us a brief insight of the qualifications and requirements of the members of each branch of Congress, also the manner of formation and conducting of the work they are required to do.

THE SENATE. The Senate of the United States, the dignified branch of Congress, consists of two members from each State of the Union.

QUALIFICATIONS. A Senator must be thirty years old, a citizen of the United States. His term of office is six years.

HOW ELECTED. The Senators are elected on joint ballot by the Legislatures of their respective States.

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF SENATORS OF THE 57TH CONGRESS WITH

THEIR PLACES OF RESIDENCES IN WASHINGTON.
Aldrich, Nelson W., R. I...... The Arlington.
Allen, William V., Nebraska...
Allison, William B., Iowa ... 1124 Vermont avenue, NW.
Bacon, Augustus O., Georgia. .1757 Oregon avenue NW.
Baker, Lucien, Kansas... The Normandie.
Bard, Thomas R., California... The Normandie.
Bate, William B., Tennessee... The Ebbitt.
Berry, James H., Arkansas... The Metropolitan.

Beveridge, Albert J., Indiana. . The Gordon.
Burrows, Julius C., Michigan. . 1404 Massachusetts Ave. N. W.
Butler, Marion, North Carolina. 1742 Q street NW.
Caffery, Donelson, Louisiana.. 21100 street N.W.
Carter, Thomas H., Montana. . 1432 Staughton street NW.
Chandler, William E., N. H.... The Arlington.
Chilton, Horace, Texas...
Clapp, Moses E., Minnesota
Clark, Clarence D., Wyoming.. 1000 Twenty-second street NW.
Clay, Alexander S., Georgia ... TheRiggs.
Cockrell, Francis M., Missouri. 1518 R street NW.
Culberson, Charles A., Texas. . The Richmond.
Cullom, Shelby M., Illinois.....1413 Massachusetts avenue NW.
Daniel, John W., Virginia 1700 Nineteenth street NW.
Deboe, William J., Kentucky .. The Logan.
Depew, Chauncey M., N. Y. 1609 H street NW.
Dillingham, W. P., Vermont .. The Cochran.
Dolliver, J. P., Iowa . .. The Portner.
Elkins, Stephen B., W. Va..... 1626 K street NW.
Fairbanks, Charles W., Indiana. 1800 Massachusetts avenue NW.
Foraker, Joseph B., Ohio..... 1500 Sixteenth street NW.
Foster, Addison G., Wash..... The Cairo.
Frye, William P., Maine... The Hamilton.
Gallinger, Jacob H., N. H..... The Dewey.
Hale, Eugene, Maine..... 1001 Sixteenth street NW.
Hanna, Marcus A., Ohio......21 Lafayette Square.
Hansbrough, Henry C., N. D... 2033 Florida avenue NW.
Harris, Willam A., Kansas 1016 Thirteenth street NW.
Hawley, Joseph R., Conn.. 1716 N street NW.
Heitfeld, Henry, Idaho..... 112 Massachusetts avenue NE.
Hoar, George F., Mass... The Richmond.
Jones, James K., Arkansas....915 M street NW.
Jones, John P., Nevada....... 1805 Ninteenth street NW.
Kean, John, New Jersey...

1700 I street NW.
Kearns, Thomas, Utah.
Kenney, Richard R., Delaware. 1710 Sixteenth street NW.
Kyle, James H., South Dakota. The Varnum.
Lindsay, William, Kentucky... 1771 Massachusetts avenue NW.
Lodge, Henry Cabot, Mass....1765 Massachusetts avenue NW.
McBride, George W., Oregon.. I В street NW.
McComas, Louis E., Maryland. 1723 Rhode Island avenue NW.
McCumber, Porter J., N. D....1534 Twenty-second street NW.
McEnery, Samuel D., La...... The Metropolitan.
McLourin, John L., S. C.,.... 1633 Q street NW.
McMillan, James, Michigan.... 1114 Vermont avenue NW.

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