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or, again, between these latter and His language in the Apocalypse; so, too, in a remarkable degree, as regards all His solemn dicta concerning the Holy See, from the first call and naming of St. Peter down to the night when, appearing to St. Paul in prison, he pronounced those most suggestive words : As thou hast testified of Me at Jerusalem, so must thou bear witness also at Rome."

By way of termination to these remarks, the fol. lowing observations upon the peculiar style and character of our Lord's language, by one especially dear to the children of St. Philip, will not be deemed out of place: “If there be a portion of Revelation," writes Father Newman, “sacred beyond other portions, distinct and remote in its nature from the rest, it must be the words and the works of the eternal Son Incarnate. He is the one Prophet of the Church, as he is our one Priest and King. Consider the peculiar character of our Lord's recorded words when on earth; they will be found to come even professedly as the declarations of a Lawgiver. In the Old Testament, Almighty God first of all spoke the Ten Commandments from Mount Sinai, and afterwards wrote them. So our Lord first spoke His own Gospel, both of promise and of precept, on the mount; and His Evangelists have recorded it. Further, when He delivered it, He spoke by way of parallel to the Ten Commandments; and His style, moreover, corresponds to the authority which He assumes. It is of that solemn, measured, and severe character, which bears on the face of it tokens of belonging to One who spake as no other man could speak. The beatitudes with which the sermon opens are instances of this incommunicable style, which befitted, as far as human words could befit, God Incarnate. Nor is this style peculiar to the Sermon on the Mount. All through the Gospels it is discernible, distinct from any other part of Scripture, showing itself in solemn declarations, canons, sentences, or sayings, such as legislators propound, and scribes and lawyers comment on. Surely every thing our Lord did and said is characterised by mingled simplicity and mystery; His emblematical actions, His typical miracles, His parables, His replies, His censures,--all are evidences of a legisiature in germ afterwards to be developed, a code of divine truths which was ever to be before men's eyes. And thus the Fathers speak of his teaching: ‘His sayings,' observes St. Justin, 'were short and concise, for He was no rhetorician; but His word was the power of God.' And St. Basil in like manner: 'Every deed, and every word of our Saviour Jesus Christ, is a canon of piety and virtue. When, then, thou hearest word or deed of His, do not hear it as by the way, or after a simple and carnal manner; but enter into the depths of His contemplations, and become a communicant in truths mystically im. parted to thee.'

May that Immaculate Lady, who merited to conceive the Eternal Word in her virginal womb, pray for those who shall use this little Compendium, and they in turn for its Editor, that the words of Jesus may daily sink deeper and deeper into the hearts of all, and bear fruit unto life eternal, through the grace of the blessed Paraclete, to whom with the Father, and the Son, be glory for ever. Amen.

ORATORY, BIRMINGHAM,

Feast of the Sacred Heart, 1855.

N.B. The Text and Doctrinal Notes are those of the Douay Testament.

which bears on the face of it tokens of belonging to One who spake as no other man could speak. The beatitudes with which the sermon opens are instances of this incommunicable style, which befitted, as far as human words could befit, God Incarnate. Nor is this style peculiar to the Sermon on the Mount. All through the Gospels it is discernible, distinct from any other part of Scripture, showing itself in solemn declarations, canons, sentences, or sayings, such as legislators propound, and scribes and lawyers comment on. Surely every thing our Lord did and said is characterised by mingled simplicity and mystery; His emblematical actions, His typical miracles, His parables, His replies, His censures,—all are evidences of a legislature in germ afterwards to be developed, a code of divine truths which was ever to be before men's eyes. And thus the Fathers speak of his teaching : ‘His sayings,' observes St. Justin, 'were short and concise, for He was no rhetorician; but His word was the power of God.' And St. Basil in like manner: Every deed, and every word of our Saviour Jesus Christ, is a canon of piety and virtue. When, then, thou hearest word or deed of His, do not hear it as by the way, or after a simple and carnal manner; but enter into the depths of His contemplations, and become a communicant in truths mystically im. parted to thee.”

May that Immaculate Lady, who merited to conceive the Eternal Word in her virginal womb, pray for those who shall use this little Compendium, and they

in turn for its Editor, that the words of Jesus may daily sink deeper and deeper into the hearts of all, and bear fruit unto life eternal, through the grace of the blessed Paraclete, to whom with the Father, and the Son, be glory for ever. Amen.

ORATORY, BIRMINGHAM,

Feast of the Sacred Heart, 1855.

N.B. The Text and Doctrinal Notes are those of the Douay Testament.

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