Charles Sumner; His Complete Works: With Introduction by Hon. George Frisbie Hoar, Volume 6

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Lee & Shepard, 1900
 

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Page 164 - The whole commerce between master and slave is a perpetual exercise of the most boisterous passions, the most unremitting despotism on the one part, and degrading submissions on the other.
Page 223 - The state of slavery is of such a nature that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons, moral or political. ... It is so odious that nothing can be suffered to support it but positive law.
Page 330 - First in war, first in peace, first in the hearts of his countrymen," was originally used in the resolutions presented to Congress on the death of Washington, December, 1799.
Page 363 - We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness; and that to secure these rights governments are instituted among men deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.
Page 338 - God that made the world and all things therein * * * hath made of one blood all nations of men for to dwell on all the face of the earth...
Page 378 - And Herod with his men of war set him at nought, and mocked him, and arrayed him in a gorgeous robe, and sent him again to Pilate. And the same day Pilate and Herod were made friends together: for before they were at enmity between themselves.
Page 192 - I am in earnest. I will not equivocate — I will not excuse — I will not retreat a single inch. AND I WILL BE HEARD.
Page 164 - The parent storms, the child looks on, catches the lineaments of wrath, puts on the same airs in the circle of smaller slaves, gives a loose to the worst of passions, and thus nursed, educated, and daily exercised in tyranny, cannot but be stamped by it with odious peculiarities. The man must be a prodigy who can retain his manners and morals undepraved by such circumstances.
Page 318 - Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye compass sea and land to make one proselyte, and when he is made, ye make him twofold more the child of hell than yourselves.
Page 171 - And as a principle of moral right, every person in his retirement must repudiate it. But in the actual condition of things, it must be so.

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