Piety and Profession: American Protestant Theological Education, 1870-1970

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Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2007 M06 11 - 821 pages
From the urbanization of the Gilded Age to the upheavals of the Haight-Ashbury era, this encyclopedic work by Glenn Miller takes readers on a sweeping journey through the landscape of American theological education, highlighting such landmarks as Princeton, Andover, and Chicago, and such fault lines as denominationalism, science, and dispensationalism.

The first such exhaustive treatment of this time period in religious education, Piety and Profession is a valuable tool for unearthing the key trends from the Civil War well into the twentieth century. All those involved in theological education will be well served by this study of how the changing world changed educational patterns.
 

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Contents

V
3
VI
25
VII
43
VIII
63
IX
88
X
113
XI
134
XII
154
XXIII
404
XXIV
451
XXV
470
XXVI
490
XXVII
517
XXVIII
538
XXIX
559
XXX
591

XIII
179
XIV
201
XV
224
XVI
246
XVII
271
XVIII
293
XIX
295
XX
314
XXI
340
XXII
381
XXXI
617
XXXII
619
XXXIII
648
XXXIV
669
XXXV
706
XXXVI
726
XXXVII
766
XXXVIII
779
XXXIX
808
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Page 64 - It is an awful moment when the soul begins to find that the props on which it has blindly rested so long, are, many of them, rotten, and begins to suspect them all ; when it begins to feel the nothingness of many of the traditionary opinions which have been received with implicit confidence, and in that horrible insecurity begins also to doubt whether there be anything to believe at all.

About the author (2007)

Glenn T. Miller is academic dean of Bangor TheologicalSeminary, Bangor, Maine. His other books include TheModern Church and Piety and Learning: A History ofAntebellum Theological Education in America.

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