School Days in the Fifties: A True Story with Some Untrue Names of Persons and Places

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A. Flanagan Company, 1906 - 131 pages

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Page 88 - Master of human destinies am I. Fame, love, and fortune on my footsteps wait, Cities and fields I walk; I penetrate Deserts and seas remote, and, passing by Hovel, and mart, and palace, soon or late I knock unbidden once at every gate! If sleeping, wake — if feasting, rise before I turn away. It is the hour of fate...
Page 45 - Lulled in the countless chambers of the brain, Our thoughts are linked by many a hidden chain. Awake but one, and lo, what myriads rise ! * Each stamps its image as the other flies.
Page 48 - He who checks a child with terror, Stops its play, and stills its song, Not alone commits an error, But a grievous moral wrong. Give it play, and never fear it, Active life is no defect ; Never, never, break its spirit ; Curb it only to direct. Would you stop the flowing river, Thinking it would cease to flow ? Onward must it flow for ever ; Better teach it where to go.
Page 85 - Poverty is uncomfortable, as I can testify; but nine times •out of ten the best thing that can happen to a young man is to be tossed overboard and compelled to sink or swim for himself. In all my acquaintance I never knew a man to be drowned who was worth the saving.
Page 88 - MASTER of human destinies am I! Fame, love, and fortune on my footsteps wait. Cities and fields I walk; I penetrate Deserts and seas remote, and passing by Hovel and mart and palace— soon or late I knock unbidden once at every gate! If sleeping, wake — if feasting, rise before I turn away. It is the hour of fate, And they who follow me reach every state Mortals desire, and conquer every foe Save death; but those who doubt or hesitate, Condemned to failure, penury, and woe, Seek me in vain and...
Page 99 - Ah !" I had planted the first want. He wanted me, and he wanted me there. He had felt my influence there: I was too far off in the chair. So I read to him two or three months more. Then, instead of reading aloud, I read to myself one day. After a long time, I saw he was trying to do something. I watched him. Gradually, he lifted his finger, and laid it on my lips. " Oh, you want me to read to you, do you?'
Page 83 - ... imperishable than the destroyer of his species, the scourge of the world, ever won. Such men, — men deserving the glorious title of teachers of mankind, I have found labouring conscientiously, though perhaps obscurely, in their blessed vocation, wherever I have gone. I have found them, and shared their fellowship, among the daring, the ambitious, the ardent, the indomitably active French; I have found them among the persevering, resolute, industrious Swiss...
Page 64 - There is no office higher than that of a teacher of youth; for there is nothing on earth so precious as the mind, soul, character of the child. No office should be regarded with greater respect. The first minds in the community should be encouraged to assume it. Parents should do all but impoverish themselves, to induce such to become the guardians and guides of their children.
Page 100 - This training went on till one day I found he could move his limbs. I put him on his hands and knees, to teach him to creep. This was nearly a year and a half after he came into the institution. As I placed him there, I said, " I wonder if I can help him to talk.
Page 34 - The principle that the main business of the teacher is to get the pupil to teach himself lies at the basis of the entire Art of Instruction.

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