Annual Address to the Public of the Lake Mohonk Conference, ... in Behalf of the Civilization and Legal Protection of the Indians of the United States, Volume 2

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Executive Committee of the Indian Rights Association, 1884

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Page 19 - Interior is hereby authorized to confirm such occupation to such society or organization, in quantity not exceeding one hundred and sixty acres in any one tract, so long as the same shall be so occupied, on such terms as he shall deem just; but nothing herein contained shall change or alter any claim of such society for religious or educational purposes heretofore granted by law.
Page 7 - An Act to provide for the allotment of lands in severalty to Indians on the various reservations, and to extend the portection of the laws of the United States and the Territories over the Indians, and for other purposes...
Page 18 - ... the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, to be expended under the direction of the Secretary of the Interior, as follows: For the expense of the survey of the land as provided in section second of this act, twelve thousand dollars.
Page 15 - ... THESE THINGS. a. Public sentiment. 6. Legislation. 8th. Resolved, That since legislation in Congress and the benevolent work of the Christian people on behalf of the Indian is dependent upon public sentiment, every effort should be made to further the development of such sentiment. To this end we commend to the sympathy and support of the public the Indian Rights Association and the Woman's National Indian Association. We urge the organization of branches of these Societies iu the principal cities...
Page 12 - Jand by fraud or force without his consent. The United States is to hold the reservations in trust for the tribes, but not as a permanent arrangement. The bill contemplates the breaking up of the entire reservation system; it contemplates the protection of the Indian land from the grasp of unscrupulous whites only until the Indian has been given the proper training and preparation to enable him to take care of his own. In the meanwhile, the bill provides an important part of this training. On the...
Page 10 - Indians to whom allotments have been made shall have the benefit of and be subject to the laws, both civil and criminal, of the state or territory in which they may reside...
Page 26 - Even the Omahas, of whom 55 members had urged allotment, were, according to Miss Fletcher, originally opposed to allotment by a majority of two-thirds. Her explanation sounds very real: "It means trouble at first; and Indians are, like the rest of mankind, unwilling to vote for present trouble in order to secure an unknown and uncertain benefit."47 Certain tribes had specific objections to allotment. A memorial from the Creeks, Choctaws, and Cherokees in 1881 read: "The change to an individual title...
Page 6 - ... result the Government should, except where it is clearly necessary either for the fulfillment of treaty stipulations or for some other binding reason, cease to recognize the Indians as political bodies or organized tribes. • 2d. Resolved, That to all Indians who desire to hold their land in severalty allotments should be made without delay ; and that to all other Indians like allotments should be made so soon as practicable. 3d. Resolved, That lands allotted and granted in severalty to Indians...
Page 7 - That we earnestly and heartily approve of the Senate Bill No. 48, generally known as the Coke Bill, as the best practicable measure yet brought before Congress for the preservation of the Indian from aggression, for the disintegration of the tribal organizations, and for the ultimate breaking up of the reservation system...
Page 10 - ... clear of all incumbrance. The land cannot be conveyed or charged during the time it is so held in trust, and the patents to individual allottees shall override the patent issued to the tribe. After the issue of patents the land shall descend according to the law of the State or Territory...

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