The Labour Annual: The Reformers' Yearbook

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"Clarion" Company, Limited, 1896
 

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Page 31 - The labour and the wounds are vain, The enemy faints not, nor faileth, And as things have been they remain. If hopes were dupes, fears may be liars; It may be, in yon smoke concealed, Your comrades chase e'en now the fliers, And, but for you, possess the field. For while the tired waves, vainly breaking, Seem here no painful inch to gain, Far back, through creeks and inlets making, Comes silent, flooding in, the main, And not by eastern windows only, When daylight comes, comes in the light, In front,...
Page 15 - Let him that stole steal no more : but rather let him labour, working with his hands the thing which is good, that he may have to give to him that needeth.
Page 115 - Hitherto it is questionable if all the mechanical inventions yet made have lightened the day's toil of any human being. They have enabled a greater population to live the same life of drudgery and imprisonment, and an increased number of manufacturers and others to make fortunes.
Page 31 - Say not the Struggle naught availeth Say not the struggle nought availeth, The labour and the wounds are vain, The enemy faints not, nor faileth, And as things have been they remain.
Page 193 - OPPORTUNITY. Master of human destinies am I ! Fame, love and fortune on my footsteps wait, Cities and fields I walk; I penetrate Deserts and seas remote, and passing by Hovel and mart and palace— soon or late I knock unbidden once at every gate I If sleeping, wake— if feasting, rise before I turn away. It is the hour of fate...
Page 5 - Ring out a slowly dying cause, And ancient forms of party strife; Ring in the nobler modes of life, With sweeter manners, purer laws.
Page 169 - THERE is NO WEALTH BUT LIFE. Life, including all its powers of love, of joy, and of admiration. That country is the richest which nourishes the greatest number of noble and happy human beings; that man is richest who, having perfected the functions of his own life to the utmost, has also the widest helpful influence, both personal, and by means of his possessions, over the lives of others.
Page 195 - Good people," cried the preacher^ " things will never go well in England so long as goods be not in common, and so long as there be villeins and gentlemen. By what right are they whom we call lords greater folk than we? On what grounds have they deserved it ? Why do they hold us in serfage? If we all came of the same father and mother, of Adam and Eve, how can they say or prove that they...
Page 15 - Six days shall thou labour, and do all that thou hast to do; but the seventh day is the Sabbath of the LORD thy God. In it thou shalt do no manner of work; thou, and thy son, and thy daughter, thy man-servant, and thy maid-servant, thy cattle, and the stranger that Is within thy gates. For in six days the LORD made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that...

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