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found in the southern, middle, and north-western parts of the North-American Union.

It is a savage and destructive animal, yet timid and cautious. In ferocity, it is quite equal to most of its kindred species, and kills small animals for the sake of drinking their blood. When pressed by hunger, it attacks large animals, though not always with success.

When the cougar seizes a sheep, or calf, it is by the throat; and then, flinging the victim over its back, it dashes off with great ease and celerity, to devour it at leisure. Deer, hogs, sheep, and calves are destroyed by the cougar whenever they are within reach. They climb or rather spring up large trees with surprising facility and vigour; and in that way are enabled, by dropping suddenly upon deer and other quadrupeds, to secure prey which it would be impossible for them to overcome in any other way.

In the day-time the cougar is seldom seen; but its peculiar cry frequently thrills the experienced traveller with horror, while camping in the forest at night; or he is startled to hear the cautious approaches of the animal, stealing step by step toward him, over the crackling leaves and brush, in the expectation of springing on an unguarded or sleeping victim, whom nothing but a rapid flight can save.

This animal is still found occasionally in the remote and thinly-settled parts of Pennsylvania. Two were killed in Centre county, by some hunters, as late as 1825. They are more numerous, however, farther west. One which was killed in Kentucky, in 1819, measured four feet and five inches from the tip of the nose to the root of the tail, and two feet seven inches in height. Around the body it measured two feet and a half.

NOTICES OF ANIMATED AND VEGETABLE

NATURE.

FOR APRIL, 1833.
“See, April comes ! a primrose coronal

Circling her sunny temples; and her vest
Prank'd with the hare-bell and the violet:
Like a young widow, beautiful in tears,

She ushers in the Spring !” 1st. WEEK. Moths are seen; frogs spawn; the pheasant crows; brilliant and numerous blossoms by the sides of ponds, brooks, ditches, &c. Daffodils are seen in similar situations, and periwinkles clothe shady banks with their fine evergreen leaves and large purple flowers. The sloe and holly blossom in the hedges; the birch and weeping willow are in leaf.

20 Week. The summer warblers return; swallows appear; the hen sits; various birds construct their nests; the meloe is seen feeding on the ranunculus: the death watch-beetles are erd. These insects woo one another by their singular ticking, which is performed by striking their foreheads seven or eight times together on old paper, wood, &c. Ground-ivy, the wood-anemone and the laburnum are in flower ; raspberries and blackberries are in leaf, and the peach-trees in blossom.

3d Week. The black-bird, thrush, sky-lark, and various other birds, sing delightfully.

And when the restless day
Expiring, lays the warbling world asleep,
Sweetest of birds, sweet Fhilomela charms

The listening groves, teaching the night His praise." The plum, cherry, sponge-laurel, and wood-sorrel, are in flower ; the walnut and chesnut are in leaf.

4th Week. The redstarts sing on the tops of trees; the cuckoo is heard, and the white-throat warbles.

“ The sonorous black-cap in the ivy-bush,
Superior to the wood-lark and the thrush,
And next to Philomela of the train

of warblers, pours his sweet melodious strain." The primrose, cowslip, polyanthus, the beautiful germanderspeedwell, and many other plants, are in flower. Greenwich, Kent.

WILLIAM ROGERSON.

BRIEF ASTRONOMICAL NOTICES,

FOR APRIL, 1833.
These are thy glorious works, thou Source of good!

How dimly seen how faintly understood !
Thine, and upheld by thy paternal care,
This universal frame, thus wondrous fair ;
Thy power divine, and bounty beyond thought,

Adored and praised in ail that thou hast wrought.” The Sun rises on the 1st at thirty-eight minutes past five, and sets at thirty-one minutes after six : on the 12th he rises at thirteen minutes past five, and sets at fifty minutes after six. The Sun enters the sign Taurus on the 20th : on the 25th he rises at fortysix minutes past four, and sets at eleven minutes after seven.

The Moon is full on the 4th, at forty-three minutes past two in the afternoon: she rises on the 6th at ten minutes past nine, and on the 8th at half-past eleven, at night. The Moon enters on her last quarter on the 11th, at six minutes after twelve at night; and rises on the 13th at three o'clock in the morning. The Moon changes on the 20th, at forty-seven minutes past one in the morning: she presents her fine crescent in the west on the 21st, and sets at a quarter before nine: she sets on the 23d at eight minutes past eleven at night, and on the 26th at a quarter after one in the morning. The Moon enters on her first quarter on the 27th, at half-past five in the morning; and passes the meridian on the 28th at sixteen minutes before eight in the evening.

MERCURY is to be seen at the beginning of the month in the evenings : he sets on the 2d at twenty minutes past eight.

Venus is a beautiful object in the evenings, and sets about eleven o'clock : she is now visible in the daytime. At the end of the month Venus appears a fine crescent through a telescope : she is in conjunction with the Moon on the 22d.

MARS is to be seen in the west after sun-set; but only appears small at present, owing to his great distance from the earth : on the 25th he is in the neighbourhood of the Moon.

JUPITER is invisible.

SATURN souths on the 18th at ten minutes before ten, and on the 24th at twenty-five minutes past nine, at night. This planet is in conjunction with the Moon on the 2d and 30th : his ring is now invisible.

The fixed star REGULUS passes the meridian on the 10th at a quarter before nine, and on the 25th an hour earlier.

*.* On the 22d, between six and eight o'clock in the evening, the Moon will eclipse several small stars in Taurus; which will afford amusement to those who have good telescopes. Greenuich, Kent.

WILLIAM ROGERSON.

JUVENILE OBITUARY. 1. Died, at Sheerness, January 28th, 1832, Eliza Drummond. She came to Sheerness in early life; and went to the Bethel Sundayschool for nine years, as a scholar, and afterwards became a teacher in the Methodist Sunday-school. Four months previous to her decease, when brought low by affliction, her thoughts were seriously directed to her soul's welfare ; yet no vigorous, serious effort was made to lay hold of Jesus Christ, as a present hope set before her in the Gospel. Five weeks before her death a friend thus interrogated her:-" If the Lord should call you soon into the eternal world, would it be well with you ?” “O no," she replied: “I am a sinner, unprepared to die! If I die in my present state, I must be lost! Pray for me, that I may enjoy the happiness of God's people.” She was exhorted to pray that the Holy Spirit might inspire her with living faith; that she might fearlessly cast her guilty soul on Jesus Christ for pardon and salvation.

A week previous to her death, the rupture of a blood-vessel threatened immediate dissolution. Some further respite was given to her. The blood ceased to flow, and she exclaimed, “If I had m2 to appear before him unprepared ! The following day her fears became gradually diminished, and she uttered a faint hope that her Redeemer liveth. It was suggested to her mind, “that was impossible. Jesus Christ is not your Redeemer.” “Pray," she said, “ for my complete deliverance ; for a full and free pardon through the blood of Jesus Christ. I will not deceive the world, nor my own soul. I will not rest until I know, most assuredly, that I am going to heaven.” On Wednesday morning, January 25th, every doubt was dispersed by a believing application to her mind of that suitable portion of God's word contained in Psalm xxxiv. 4, “ I sought the Lord, and he heard me, and delivered me from all my fears." She doubted no more. To her mother she said, “ To patient faith the prize is sure. I am going to heaven. If I had a voice, I could sing,

Land me safe on Canaan's side,'" &c.

On Friday her speech began to fail. She called the family together, and beginning with her mother,-a disciple of the Saviour, she said, “Do not, do not fret. I am going to heaven. You will soon follow me there.” Taking her three brothers, one by one, by the hand, she exhorted them to seek salvation. She entreated them not to follow her example, and defer that great work to a dying hour. “For your sister's sake, for God's sake, leave off bad society; attend a place of worship; be good to your mother.” To her eldest brother she said, very specially, “ Take care of her.” She then gave him her Bible, with strong entreaties to make a good use of it; to make it his chief companion. To her aged father she said, “ My strength fails. Go to the chapel. I am going to heaven.” She then kissed him, and said, “God bless you!”

On the night of Friday, January 27th, she fell into a sleep of three hours' duration. Upon awaking, she made signs with a pin, that she wanted a pen. She wrote, “I shall be in glory by one o'clock ; but I shall spit blood again:” and added, “ Pray, if the will of God be such, that I may then be gone.” A friend prayed. Her last struggle commenced. She died spitting blood, agreeable to her own intimation, at half past ten on Saturday morning, in the twentieth year of her age.

“She is gone! and the grave hath received her;

'Twas Jesus who call'd her away :
She is gone to the Lord who redeem'd her,

From night, to the splendour of day!
She is gone! but we will not deplore her;

Then weep not, ye friends left behind :
She is gone! and we would not restore her,

'Mong the halt, and the maim'd, and the blind.
She is gone where the blessed before her,

Are singing the praise of the Lamb;
She is gone where all tongues rejoice o'er her,
Surrounding the mighty I AM."

on the 20th, at forty-seven minutes past one in the morning: she presents her fine crescent in the west on the 21st, and sets at a quarter before nine: she sets on the 23d at eight minutes past eleven at night, and on the 26th at a quarter after one in the morning. The Moon enters on her first quarter on the 27th, at half-past five in the morning; and passes the meridian on the 28th at sixteen minutes before eight in the evening.

MERCURY is to be seen at the beginning of the month in the evenings: he sets on the 2d at twenty minutes past eight.

VENUS is a beautiful object in the evenings, and sets about eleven o'clock : she is now visible in the daytime. At the end of the month Venus appears a fine crescent through a telescope : she is in conjunction with the Moon on the 22d.

MARS is to he seen in the west after sun-set; but only appears small at present, owing to his great distance from the earth : on the 25th he is in the neighbourhood of the Moon.

JUPITER is invisible.

SATURN souths on the 18th at ten minutes before ten, and on the 24th at twenty-five minutes past nine, at night. This planet is in conjunction with the Moon on the 2d and 30th : his ring is now invisible.

The fixed star REGULUS passes the meridian on the 10th at a quarter before nine, and on the 25th an hour earlier.

*.* On the 22d, between six and eight o'clock in the evening, the Moon will eclipse several small stars in Taurus; which will afford amusement to those who have good telescopes. Greenwich, Kent.

WILLIAM ROGERSON.

JUVENILE OBITUARY.

1. Died, at Sheerness, January 28th, 1832, Eliza Drummond. She came to Sheerness in early life ; and went to the Bethel Sundayschool for nine years, as a scholar, and afterwards became a teacher in the Methodist Sunday-school. Four months previous to her decease, when brought low by affliction, her thoughts were seriously directed to her soul's welfare ; yet no vigorous, serious effort was made to lay hold of Jesus Christ, as a present hope set before her in the Gospel. Five weeks before her death a friend thus interrogated her:-"If the Lord should call you soon into the eternal world, would it be well with you?” “O no," she replied : “I am a sinner, unprepared to die! If I die in my present state, I must be lost! Pray for me, that I may enjoy the happiness of God's people.” She was exhorted to pray that the Holy Spirit might inspire her with living faith; that she might fearlessly cast her guilty soul on Jesus Christ for pardon and salvation.

A week previous to her death, the rupture of a blood-vessel threatened immediate dissolution. Some further respite was given to her. The blood ceased to flow, and she exclaimed, “If I had

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