Page images
PDF
EPUB

NOTICES OF ANIMATED AND VEGETABLE

NATURE.

FOR JUNE, 1833.
O! there's a wild rose in yon rugged dell,

Fragrant as that which blooms the garden's pride;
And there 's a sympathy no tongue can tell,

Breathed from the linnet chanting by its side :
And there is music in that whispering rill,

Far more delightsome than the raging main ;
And more of beauty in yon verdant hill,

Than to the grandest palace can 'pertain:
For there is nought so lovely and serene,

Throughout the chambers of the mightiest king,
As the pure calm that rests upon this scene,

'Mid sporting lambkins and the songs of spring:
Yet oft attracted by some dazzling show,

Man flies from peace, pursuing gilded woe.” 1st Week.—Various species of young birds are now to be seen : the insect-tribes are busy: the female glow-worm displays her beautiful lamp in the evenings, on heaths, mossy banks, &c.,

To captivate her favourite fly,

And tempt the rover through the dark." The bee gathers honey from numerous blossoms; and the butterfly flies before us from flower to flower, like a fairy that would lure us omward to adventures. The beautiful water-lilies, yellow and white, are now in flower ; the yellow iris, with its green and glossy spears, succeeds the water-violet in ponds and marshes; and the whole face of the country is blushing with blossoms.

2d Week.—The burnet-moth and the horse-fly appear: bees swarm. The pretty scarlet pimpernal is common in waste-ground, opening in fine and closing in wet weather, in consequence of which it has obtained the name of the “ Poor man's weather-glass : ” heaths and commons begin to lose the light of the broom-bush, which now forms its snapping pods; and the raspberry-bush bears promise of its delicate fruit.

3d Week.—Rooks desert the rookery, and are seen feeding their young in almost every pasture and umbrageous tree : the swallow and swift career in clear skies; and

Ten thousand insects in the air abound,

Flitting on glancing wings that yield a summer sound."

The hairy willow-herb displays her showy corals; the queen of the meadows commences her fragrant reign, and the white convolvulus gleams like moonlight upon the hedges by the way-side.

4th Week. Many of the singing birds discontinue their song, and retire to the woods: the cuckoo is no longer heard. The golden-green beetle is seen; various kinds of flies appear; the cuckoo-spit insect now is common, and the stag-beetle hovers in the air in the evenings : the numerous species of aphides (or plantlice) are now found on many plants, particularly on the rose-tree and bean; and tadpoles appear in great swarms in ponds and ditches. Clover is now in blossom, and yields its delightful fragrance ; the poppy, fox-glove, and elder-tree are in blow, and the several species of corn and grasses are in flower. Greenwich, Kent.

WILLIAM ROGERSON.

BRIEF ASTRONOMICAL NOTICES,

FOR JUNE, 1833.

“ Almighty Power! amazing are thy ways,
Above our knowledge and above our praise !
How all thy works thy excellence display!
How fair, how great, how wonderful are they !
Thy hand yon wide-extended heaven upraised,
Yon wide-extended heaven with stars emblazed,
Where each bright orb since time his course begun
Has roll’d a mighty world, or shined a sun !
Stupendous thought! how sinks all human race!

A point, an atom, in the abyss of space." The Sun rises on the 1st at fifty-one minutes past three, and sets at five minutes after eight: on the 12th he rises at forty-five minutes past three, and sets at fourteen minutes after eight. The Sun enters the solsticial sign Cancer on the 21st, at seventeen minutes past five in the afternoon, at which time the summer quarter commences; and on the 28th the Sun rises at forty-seven minutes after three, and sets at eighteen minutes after eight.

The Moon is full on the 2d, at ten minutes before twelve at noon; and rises on the 3d at a quarter past nine in the evening: she rises on the 5th at ten o'clock, and on the 7th at midnight. The Moon enters on her last quarter on the 10th, at twenty minutes past twelve at noon; and rises on the 12th at half-past one in the morning. The Moon changes on the 17th, at ten minutes past eleven at night; and sets on the 20th at forty minutes after ten in the evening: she enters on her first quarter on the 24th, at thirty minutes past three in the afternoon; and passes the meridian on the 26th at ten minutes before eight: she souths on the 28th at halfpast nine, and on the 30th at a quarter after eleven, at night.

MERCURY is invisible.

Venus is now a morning star, and is to be seen in the eastern horizon before sun-rise : she appears a beautiful crescent through a good telescope.

Mars sets on the 8th at twenty minutes past eleven, and on the 26th about half-past ten, at night.

JUPITER appears in the mornings : he rises on the 4th at two o'clock, and on the 15th about one hour earlier.

Saturn is to be seen in the south-west after sun-set: his ring is invisible, even through a powerful telescope, till the 10th ; afterwards it may be discerned. Saturn sets on the 16th about midThe bright fixed star, Arcturus, souths on the 1st at half-past nine, and on the 16th at half-past eight, in the evening.

* On Monday, the 1st of July, the Moon will be visibly eclipsed at midnight : the eclipse will begin at four minutes past eleven ; middle, forty-three minutes past twelve, when above ten parts out of twelve of the Moon's disk will be darkened; and the eclipse will end at twenty-one minutes after two o'clock on Tuesday morning. Greenwich, Kent.

WILLIAM ROGERSON.

JUVENILE OBITUARY. 1. DIED, Jan. 8th, 1832, at Rockley Hall, in the Barnsley Circuit, Miss Anne Biggins, in the twenty-third year of her age. She was a subject of religious impressions in early life, most probably in consequence of the religious instruction given her by a pious mother. When she was about twelve or thirteen years of age she visited her brother-in-law, who then resided at Tankersley. Her design was, that she might have an opportunity of attending some prayer-meetings which were held in the neighbourhood. These serious impressions, however, soon wore off; and the pleasures of the world, and the care of other things, occupied her attention.

In April, 1829, she again visited her pious brother-in-law, who had rernoved to Wombwell. She inquired if he were going to Burton lovefeast: he told her he was ; and if she were desirous of going, he would engage to procure her admittance. To this sbe readily agreed, and accompanied him to the house of God. Mr. Brookes preached a sermon preparatory to the lovefeast; at which time it pleased the Father of mercies to shine into her mind, and enlighten her understanding, so that she saw and felt herself a great sinner before God. The lovefeast succeeded the sermon, and afterwards a prayer-meeting. Here she was in the deepest distress, in consequence of the danger to which she was exposed through sin. From that time she had no enjoyment in the pleasures of the world, but gave up every thing she believed to be contrary to the will of God, and began carefully to seek the Lord with her whole heart.

On the 8th of February, 1830, she, accompanied by a cousin, attended a religious meeting, at which time her distress was insupportable. It pleased the Lord, in his infinite mercy, to look upon his handmaid, and remove the burden from her mind, by enabling her to rely solely on the merits of her crucified Saviour; and she was enabled to say,

My God is reconciled,

His pard’ning voice I hear,
He owns me for his child,

I can no longer fear;
With confidence I now draw nigh,

And, Father, Abba, Father, cry." She went home from the meeting rejoicing in the salvation of God; and from that time her deep piety, profound humility, zeal for the

and bean; and tadpoles appear in great swarms in ponds and ditches. Clover is now in blossom, and yields its delightful fragrance ; the poppy, fox-glove, and elder-tree are in blow, and the several species of corn and grasses are in flower. Greenwich, Kent.

WILLIAM ROGERSON.

BRIEF ASTRONOMICAL NOTICES,

FOR JUNE, 1833.

“ Almighty Power! amazing are thy ways,
Above our knowledge and above our praise !
How all thy works thy excellence display!
How fair, how great, how wonderful are they!
Thy hand yon wide-extended heaven upraised,
Yon wide-extended heaven with stars emblazed,
Where each bright orb since time his course begun
Has roll'd a mighty world, or shined a sun!
Stupendous thought! how sinks all human race!

A point, an atom, in the abyss of space.” THE Sun rises on the 1st at fifty-one minutes past three, and sets at five minutes after eight: on the 12th he rises at forty-five minutes past three, and sets at fourteen minutes after eight. The Sun enters the solsticial sign Cancer on the 21st, at seventeen minutes past five in the afternoon, at which time the summer quarter commences; and on the 28th the Sun rises at forty-seven minutes after three, and sets at eighteen minutes after eight.

The Moon is full on the 2d, at ten minutes before twelve at noon; and rises on the 3d at a quarter past nine in the evening: she rises on the 5th at ten o'clock, and on the 7th at midnight. The Moon enters on her last quarter on the 10th, at twenty minutes past twelve at noon; and rises on the 12th at half-past one in the morning. The Moon changes on the 17th, at ten minutes past eleven at night; and sets on the 20th at forty minutes after ten in the evening: she enters on her first quarter on the 24th, at thirty minutes past three in the afternoon; and passes the meridian on the 26th at ten minutes before eight: she souths on the 28th at halfpast nine, and on the 30th at a quarter after eleven, at night.

MERCURY is invisible.

Venus is now a morning star, and is to be seen in the eastern horizon before sun-rise : she appears a beautiful crescent through a good telescope.

MARS sets on the 8th at twenty minutes past eleven, and on the 26th about half-past ten, at night.

JUPITER appears in the mornings : he rises on the 4th at two o'clock, and on the 15th about one hour earlier.

.SATURN is to be seen in the south-west after sun-set: his ring is invisible, even through a powerful telescope, till the 10th ; afterwards it may be discerned. Saturn sets on the 16th about midThe bright fixed star, Arcturus, souths on the 1st at half-past nine, and on the 16th at half-past eight, in the evening.

* On Monday, the 1st of July, the Moon will be visibly eclipsed at midnight : the eclipse will begin at four minutes past eleven ; middle, forty-three minutes past twelve, when above ten parts out of twelve of the Moon's disk will be darkened; and the eclipse will end at twenty-one minutes after two o'clock on Tuesday ning. Greenwich, Kent.

WILLIAM ROGERSON.

JUVENILE OBITUARY. 1. DIED, Jan. 8th, 1832, at Rockley Hall, in the Barnsley Circuit, Miss Anne Biggins, in the twenty-third year of her age.

She was a subject of religious impressions in early life, most probably in consequence of the religious instruction given her by a pious mother. When she was about twelve or thirteen years of age she visited her brother-in-law, who then resided at Tankersley. Her design was, that she might have an opportunity of attending some prayer-meetings which were held in the neighbourhood. These serious impressions, however, soon wore off; and the pleasures of the world, and the care of other things, occupied her attention.

In April, 1829, she again visited her pious brother-in-law, who had rernoved to Wombwell. She inquired if he were going to Burton lovefeast; he told her he was ; and if she were desirous of going, he would engage to procure her admittance. To this she readily agreed, and accompanied him to the house of God. Mr. Brookes preached a sermon preparatory to the lovefeast; at which time it pleased the Father of mercies to shine into her mind, and enlighten her understanding, so that she saw and felt herself a great sinner before God. The lovefeast succeeded the sermon, and afterwards a prayer-meeting. Here she was in the deepest distress, in consequence of the danger to which she was exposed through sin. From that time she had no enjoyment in the pleasures of the world, but gave up every thing she believed to be contrary to the will of God, and began carefully to seek the Lord with her whole heart.

On the 8th of February, 1830, she, accompanied by a cousin, attended a religious meeting, at which time her distress was insupportable. It pleased the Lord, in his infinite mercy, to look upon his handmaid, and remove the burden from her mind, by enabling her to rely solely on the merits of her crucified Saviour; and she was enabled to say,

“My God is reconciled,

His pard'ning voice I hear,
He owns me for his child,

I can no longer fear;
With confidence I now draw nigh,

And, Father, Abba, Father, cry.' She went home from the meeting rejoicing in the salvation of God; and from that time her deep piety, profound humility, zeal for the

« PreviousContinue »