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several miles off; and on Saturday evening Kennedy asked liberty from his master to go, and bring home the gun, which was with difficulty granted. Had not the gun been brought home that night, there is no doubt the house would not only have been robbed, but every soul murdered ; as it was evident they had intended to leave no person alive to tell tales.

SPECIMENS OF OLD ENGLISH. No. XII.

SAINT AUGUSTINE saith he knew a man that at al times, when himself pleased, would sweate very abundantlie, exciting the expulsive vertue by meere imagination. He declareth also, in the same booke, that another man whom he knew, when he heard a mournefull song, or dolorous sounding voyce, or of one weeping or sobbing, he would apprehend the same with so strange an imagination, as hee fell downe in a swoune, lying stone-still without any feeling. And whatsoeuer men did vnto him, pricking him with pinnes, or burning his fingers, yet he appeared not to feele any thing. Neuerthelesse, hee would reuiue, and come to himselfe againe, when some joyfull or pleasing sound came neere him, even as if hee heard it a great way off.*

JONAS HANWAY. Jonas HANWAY, Esq., was born in 1712, at Portsmouth. He devoted the last thirty years of his life almost exclusively to the service of mankind. The forlorn chimneysweepers, the Marine-Society, the Magdalen, the Foundling, the Sunday-schools, and many other objects, he countenanced, and their welfare he assiduously endeavoured to promote. He was particularly impressed with the awful idea of mortality. Many men, knowing that death is inevitable, endeavour to banish the idea from their minds; but he seemed to place before him the sentiment of mortality so often expressed in holy Scripture. He caused the following to be inscribed on a large plate of brass enamelled, so contrived as to slide on rollers, and form the back of a wardrobe, and lock in a secret manner. At the top of the plate was painted, on the left side, himself in an infant state, and on the right, on a death bed, and underneath the lines,

I BELIEVE THAT MY REDEEMER LIVETH,

AND THAT I ALSO SHALL RISE TROM

THE GRAVE.
JONAS HANWAY, ESQ.,
WHO, TRUSTING IN THAT GOOD PROVIDENCE

WHICH SO SENSIBLY GOVERNS THE WORLD,
PASSED THROUGH A VARIETY OF FORTUNES WITH PATIENCE.

LIVING THE GREATEST PART OF HIS DAYS
IN FOREIGN LANDS, RULED BY ARBITRARY POWER,

HE RECEIVED THE DEEPER IMPRESSION
OP THE HAPPY CONSTITUTION OF HIS OWN COUNTRY ;

WHILST

THE PERSUASIVE LAWS CONTAINED IN THE

NEW TESTAMENT,
AND THE CONSCIOUSNESS OF HIS OWN DEPRAVITY,

SOFTENED HIS HEART TO A SENSE

OF THE VARIOUS WANTS OF HIS

FELLOW CREATURES.

READER,
INQUIRE NO FURTHER:

THE LORD HAVE MERCY ON HIS SOUL AND THINE.

Apprehensive of the too partial regard of his friends, and esteeming plain truth above the proudest trophies of monumental flattery, at the age of fifty he caused this plate and inscription to be made. He died September 5, 1786, aged seventy-four.

RELIGION AND SUPERSTITION. The inexperienced mind often imbibes a prejudice against religion, by confounding its effects with those of bigotry and superstition : but light and darkness are not more difstition. The one is the favoured child of heaven, the other the offspring of the infernal regions. The one appears with a train of attendant graces, peace, joy, and love ; the other is followed by a group of infernal harpies, discord, hatred, and oppression.

True religion is uniformly cheerful, from a consciousness of the divine favour; superstition is wrapped in gloom, with a view to recommend itself by rigid austerities; while religion is peaceable, gentle, merciful, long-suffering, and forbearing, superstition is severe, revengeful, uncharitable, and merciless. Superstition has often worn the mask of religion, and under this hypocritical disguise, she has been the parent of crimes that would make hell's inhabitants blush to see themselves so far outdone in wickedness. It was superstition that rejected and crucified the Messiah, and lighted the flames of persecution for his followers. It was superstition that reared the gloomy walls of the Inquisition, and invented the wheel and rack to overawe the consciences of men. The same superstition, in the first settlement in New-England, banished, and even put to death, the unoffending Quaker, in a land of professed Gospel light and liberty.

It is superstition that excites animosities among the professors of Christianity, and is the parent of all the unhappy divisions that have agitated the Christian world ; and the same spirit of superstition that brands with opprobrious epithets the humble followers of the Redeemer, would, if the hydra were not chained by the civil law, again enkindle the flames of the auto da , and bind the victim to the stake. But while we view, with merited detestation, the black caricature of superstition, we are not to brand with this stigma the solemn requisitions of real devotion. The terror that sometimes fastens on an awakened mind is not the effect of superstition. It is not superstitious to believe in the solemn realities of heaven and hell, or to be suitably affected with the prospect of eternity. The idea of endless banishment from God is truly affecting; and no wonder if the dread of this gloomy separation from all good, together

the following to be inscribed on a large plate of brass enamelled, so contrived as to slide on rollers, and form the back of a wardrobe, and lock in a secret manner. At the top of the plate was painted, on the left side, himself in an infant state, and on the right, on a death bed, and underneath thc lines,

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THE GRAVE.
JONAS HANWAY, ESQ.,
WHO, TRUSTING IN THAT GOOD PROVIDENCE

WHICH SO SENSIBLY GOVERNS THE WORLD,
PASSED THROUGH A VARIETY OF FORTUNES WITH PATIENCE.

LIVING THE GREATEST PART OF HIS DAYS
IN FOREIGN LANDS, RULED BY ARBITRARY POWER,

HE RECEIVED THE DEEPER IMPRESSION

OF THE HAPPY CONSTITUTION OF HIS OWN COUNTRY ;

WHILST

THE PERSUASIVE LAWS CONTAINED IN THE

NEW TESTAMENT,

AND THE CONSCIOUSNESS OF HIS OWN DEPRAVITY,

SOFTENED HIS HEART TO A SENSE

OF THE VARIOUS WANTS OF HIS

FELLOW CREATURES.

READER,
INQUIRE NO FURTHER:

THE LORD HAVE MERCY ON HIS SOUL AND THINC.

Apprehensive of the too partial regard of his friends, and esteeming plain truth above the proudest trophies of monumental flattery, at the age of fifty he caused this plate and inscription to be made. He died September 5, 1786, aged seventy-four.

RELIGION AND SUPERSTITION. The inexperienced mind often imbibes a prejudice against religion, by confounding its effects with those of bigotry and superstition : but light and darkness are not more difstition. The one is the favoured child of heaven, the other the offspring of the infernal regions. The one appears with a train of attendant graces, peace, joy, and love ; the other is followed by a group of infernal harpies, discord, hatred, and oppression.

True religion is uniformly cheerful, from a consciousness of the divine favour; superstition is wrapped in gloom, with a view to recommend itself by rigid austerities ; while religion is peaceable, gentle, merciful, long-suffering, and forbearing, superstition is severe, revengeful, uncharitable, and merciless. Superstition has often worn the mask of religion, and under this hypocritical disguise, she has been the parent of crimes that would make bell's inhabitants blush to see themselves so far outdone in wickedness. It was superstition that rejected and crucified the Messiah, and lighted the flames of persecution for his followers. It was superstition that reared the gloomy walls of the Inquisition, and invented the wheel and rack to overawe the consciences of men. The same superstition, in the first settlement in New-England, banished, and even put to death, the unoffending Quaker, in a land of professed Gospel light and liberty.

It is superstition that excites animosities among the professors of Christianity, and is the parent of all the unhappy divisions that have agitated the Christian world ; and the same spirit of superstition that brands with opprobrious epithets the humble followers of the Redeemer, would, if the hydra were not chained by the civil law, again enkindle the flames of the auto da , and bind the victim to the stake. But while we view, with merited detestation, the black caricature of superstition, we are not to brand with this stigma the solemn requisitions of real devotion. The terror that sometimes fastens on an awakened mind is not the effect of superstition. It is not superstitious to believe in the solemn realities of heaven and hell, or to be suitably affected with the prospect of eternity. The idea of endless banishment from God is truly affecting; and no wonder if the dread of this gloomy separation from all good, together

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