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than that of pleasure or diversion. This amusement is so congenial to the frolic spirit of boyhood, that in vicinities where otter slides are found, youngsters while bathing sometimes take possession of one, and sitting at the top glide thence with great glee into the water, in imitation of the sports of the otter. But not recollecting that the skin of the otter is protected by a thick and fine fur against the effects of friction, the poor lads find, on relinquishing their play, that, notwithstanding the apparent smoothness of the slide, the fine sand mingled with the clay has robbed them of a broad surface of cuticle ; the loss of which experimentally convinces them, before they can limp home, that an otter-slide, in the end, is not well suited for the recreation of human bathers.

The American otter is about five feet in length, including the tail, the length of which is eighteen inches. The colour of the whole body (except the chin and throat, which are dusky white) is a glossy brown. The fur throughout is dense and fine.

The differences between this species and the European otter are thus pointed out by Captain Sabine:-" The neck of the American otter is elongated, not short; and the head narrow and long, in comparison with the short broad visage of the European species; the ears are consequently much closer together than in the latter animal. The tail is more pointed, and shorter, being considerably less than one half of the length of the body; whilst the tail of the European otter is more than half the length of his body.”

The fur of the otter is much valued by the hatters, and other consumers of peltries; and as the animal is hunted at all times, without any regard to the preservation or increase of the species, it must ultimately be. come as rare in North-America as the kindred species has long since become in Europe.-Godman's American Natural History.

ADVICE TO AN APPRENTICE. As soon as you are bound, you are at your master's disbent mass; and numbers of them are occasionally killed with clubs by the Indians, while thus endeavouring to inake their escape.

The old otters, however, are often able to disappoint their pursuers by force, if not by address;

for they turn upon them with great fury and ferocity ; and so desperate are the wounds inflicted by their teeth, that few persons are willing to encounter the severity of their bite. The Indians have various methods of killing the otter; one of which is that of concealing themselves near the haunts of the animal on moon-light nights, and shooting them when they come forth for the purpose of feeding or sporting. A common mode of taking them is by sinking a steel trap near the mouth of their burrow, over which the animal must pass in entering or leaving the den.

We have alluded to the sporting of the otter; and may now remark that its disposition in this respect is singular and interesting. Their favourite sport is sliding' ; and for this

purpose in winter the highest ridge of snow is selected, to the top of which the otters scramble, where lying on the belly, with the fore-feet bent backwards, they give themselves an impulse with their hind-legs, and swiftly glide head-foremost down the declivity, sometimes for the distance of twenty yards. This sport they continue, apparently with the keenest enjoyment, until fatigue or hunger induces them to desist.

In the summer this amusement is obtained by selecting a spot where the river-bank is sloping, has clayey soil, and the water at its base is of a considerable depth. The otters then remove from the surface, for the breadth of several feet, the sticks, roots, stones, and other obstructions, and render the surface as smooth as possible. They climb up the bank at a less precipitous spot, and starting from the top, slip with velocity over the inclining ground, and plump into the water to a depth proportioned to their weight and rapidity of motion. After a few slides and plunges the surface of the clay becomes very smooth and slippery, and the rapid succession of the sliders shows how much these animals are delighted by the game, as well as how capable than that of pleasure or diversion. This amusement is so congenial to the frolic spirit of boyhood, that in vicinities where otter slides are found, youngsters while bathing sometimes take possession of one, and sitting at the top glide thence with great glee into the water, in imitation of the sports of the otter. But not recollecting that the skin of the otter is protected by a thick and fine fur against the effects of friction, the poor lads find, on relinquishing their play, that, notwithstanding the apparent smoothness of the slide, the fine sand mingled with the clay has robbed them of a broad surface of cuticle ; the loss of which experimentally convinces them, before they can limp home, that an otter-slide, in the end, is not well suited for the recreation of human bathers.

The American otter is about five feet in length, including the tail, the length of which is eighteen inches. The colour of the whole body (except the chin and throat, which are dusky white) is a glossy brown. The fur throughout is dense and fine.

The differences between this species and the European otter are thus pointed out by Captain Sabine:—" The neck of the American otter is elongated, not short; and the head narrow and long, in comparison with the short broad visage of the European species; the ears are consequently much closer together than in the latter animal. The tail is more pointed, and shorter, being considerably less than one half of the length of the body; whilst the tail of the European otter is more than half the length of his body.”

The fur of the otter is much valued by the hatters, and other consumers of peltries; and as the animal is hunted at all times, without any regard to the preservation or increase of the species, it must ultimately be. come as rare in North-America as the kindred species has long since become in Europe.-Godman's American Natural History.

ADVICE TO AN APPRENTICE. As soon as you are bound, you are at your master's dis

hands, your strength, and all that you can do. He becomes a sort of parent to you; and though not a natural, yet a legal father. You are also obliged, not only by the laws of your country, and the tenor of your indentures, but by the fifth commandment of God, to pay him all due submis sion and honour. To do this is a most material part of your duty as a Christian, as well as your undeniable debt as an apprentice. It is required of you by God, in holy Scripture, and you must not once imagine that you do what is pleasing to Him unless you conscientiously perform it. Now, that you may know what it is that your master will expect from you, and what it is that the Lord has enjoined you with regard to him, remember it consists, first, in reverence of his person; secondly, in obedience to his commands; and, thirdly, in faithfulness in his business.

First, in reverence of his person. You must esteem him very highly for his superiority's sake, and the resemblance he bears to God. For God, who made you, and has an uncontrollable power over you, has communicated some of that power to your master; so that you are to look upon him as the representative, in some sort, of the divine majesty, and invested with some of his authority. Accordingly St. Paul says, 1 Tim. vi. 1, “ You must count him worthy of all honour;" all, that is, internal and external, that of the actions and words, as well as that of the heart. It is not enough maintain a worthy estimation inwardly, but you must let it appear on all occasions outwardly, by behaving yourself very obligingly to him before his face, and by speaking very respectfully of him behind his back. Suppose you should discern failings and infirmities in him, you must by no means divulge them, or make yourself merry with them, much less must you dare to set light by any of his orders. Whatever you have reason to think will grieve or displease him, or will be prejudicial or offensive to him, that you must cautiously forbear.

Secondly, obedience to his commands. See how full the Apostle speaks to this purpose, Col. iii. 22: Servants, obey in all things your masters according to the flesh.”

but also the compass and latitude of your obedience, how large and extensive it is. It reaches not barely to a few, but to all and every instance. If you should receive orders that are ever so much against the grain of your own inclination, you must force yourself to comply with them; receive them as you used to do nauseous physic; though they may be unpleasant at first, they will do you good, and be comfortable to you afterwards; your own pleasure must always stoop, and give way to your master's. If he sets you a task that is mean and ignoble, and such as (according to the expression of the world) is thought to be beneath a gentleman's son, do not scruple it, but dispatch it cheer fully. Remember who hath said, “Servants, obey your masters in all things.” And O remember that, however well born and bred we are, yet He that was higher than the highest of us all, even the most excellent and illus trious Person that ever lived, condescended to the lowest and (such as our fine folks would account) most shameful offices. The Lord Jesus Christ, though “ the brightness of his Father's glory,” disdained not to wash his disciples' feet. Neither be dejected because you are treated in an unworthy manner, or set to do some mean and low office for your master, or his family; but rejoice rather in that you are made like unto your Redeemer, and in the happy pros pect you will have of becoming great in heaven, by being little on earth. I am aware this piece of advice is not so unexceptionable as the rest: it may possibly be adjudged the mark of too yielding and sneaking a spirit; but never forget that the things which are most highly esteemed by God, are held in least repute by men. I know and am sure, that if any apprentice would make such a compliance for the sake of preserving peace, and out of conscience to the command of God, and with an eye to the example of Christ, there is a day coming when he will not repent of it; when it will not be deemed a blot in his character, but be “an ornament of grace to his head, and more comely than chains about his neck.”* Well, you see your obe

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