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COMPENSATION OF STEAM RAILROAD EMPLOYES.

Having made some observations as to the number constituting the great army of steam railway employes of those companies that annually make report to this office, it is important and interesting te consider the compensation that is paid these men for the services they render their employers. For the year covered by this report $299,808,718 made up the budget of money that was given to this great industrial army for services rendered during the year.

The following table covering a period of five years, therein men. tioned, shows the amount paid each year by the ten leading companies, from which it appears that a very large percentage of all the money that has been paid as compensation to railway employes comes from these ten large corporations.

TABLE SHOWING "TOTAL YEARLY COMPENSATION PAID TO EM

PLOYES" BY THE TEN LEADING CORPORATIONS NAMED FOR THE YEARS 1902, 1903, 9104, 1905 AND 1906.

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In consolidated table F, relating to steam railway corporations will be found a classification of train mileage as follows: Number of miles run by passenger trains; number of miles run by mixed trains; number of miles run by freight trains; total number of miles l'un.

The public service of railroads can be seen by studying the items of train mileage under the classification as above indicated.

The total train mileage of the Baltimore and Ohio is nearly 40,000,000; of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western, about 12,000,000; of the Erie, 19,000,000; of the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern, 16,000,000; of the Lehigh Valley, 12,000,000; of the New York Central and Hudson River, 44,000,000; of the Pennsylvania, 58,000,000; of the Pennsylvania Company, 19,000,000; of the Philadelphia and Reading, 17,000,000; of the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis over 17,000,000. The total train mileage of all companies whose reports of operations are filed in this department is 318,506,021. From a comparison of the total train mileage with that of the ten companies referred to, it will be seen that a large proportion of the total train mileage is assignable to the ten companies mentioned.

Five years ago the train mileage was about 261,000,000; now, as above indicated, it amounts to 318,000,000.

Under the classification with reference to passenger, freight and mixed trains for the year covered by this report, the total number of miles run by passenger trains was 132,779,571; by mixed trains 3,588,664; by freight trains 182,137,786, making the total of 318,506,021.

PASSENGERS CARRIED,

In consolidated table G, among other things therein contained are data showing, first, the number of passengers carried earning revenue; second, the number of passengers carried one mile; third, the average distance carried.

Under the first classification, the number of passengers carried for the year was 297,271,092. Of this number the Baltimore and Ohio carried about 16,000,000; the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western, 20,000,000; the Erie, 22,000,000; the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern, 7,000,000; the Lehigh Valley, 5,000,000; the New York Central and Hudson River, 46,000,000; the Pennsylvania, 58,000,000; the Pennsylvania Company, 11,000,000; the Philadelphia and Reading, 29,000,000; the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis, 10,000,000.

In 1901 the total number of passengers carried on all railroads reporting was 216,000,000; in 1902, 243,000,000; in 1903, 260,000,000; in 1904, 267,000,000; in 1905, 281,000,000; in 1906, as above indicated 297,000,000. It is evident that the reports for the coming year will show the number of passengers carried on the railroads reporting to this office to be upwards of 300,000,000. Dropping back to 1887, to the reports of twenty years ago, it is found that the total number of passengers carried then was 92,252,124.

In considering the number of passengers carried and other data regarding the classifications of passenger traffic, it must be remembered that twenty years ago the New York Central, the Baltimore and Obio and one or two other roads only reported the number of passengers carried in operations within the State of Pennsylvania. Therefore, all the disparity shown between the nearly 300,000,000 of passengers now carried and the 92,000,000 carried twenty years ago, is not assignable to an increase, although a very large percentage of it is.

Number of Passengers carried One Mile.

The single mile basis furnishes the true basis upon which to predicate many things relating to the operations of steam railroads in conducting the passenger traffic department.

On short lines of railroad operated through territory densely populated the average number of miles which passengers are carried will be small compared with the average number of miles that passengers are carried on lines of railway whose mileage is great and on lines lying in territories where there is no great density of population.

In determining the receipts per passenger per mile and in determining the cost of carrying passengers one mile, it is necessary to reduce the number of passengers carried and the total mileage to a single mile basis. Under the above classification therefore, will be found the number of passengers carried one mile by each operating railroad company making report to this office. Reducing to a single mile basis the number of passengers carried during the year covered by this report, we have 7,588,664,623 passengers carried one mile. Of this number the Baltimore and Ohio have carried over 682,000,000; the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western, 408,000,000; the Erie, 554,000,000; the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern, 396,000,000; the Lehigh Valley, 227,000,000; the New York Central and Hudson River, 1,523,000,000; the Pennsylvania, 1,389,000,000; the Pennsylvania Company, 321,000,000; the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis 329,000,000.

In 1901, the total number of passengers carried one mile was 5,237,000,000; in 1902, the number was 6,227,000,000; in 1903, 6,469,000,000; in 1904, 6,737,000,000; in 1905, 6,804,000,000; and as above indicated in 1906, 7,588,000,000. Twenty years ago the total number of passengers carried one mile by all roads then reporting to this office was 892,252,188.

Average Distance Passengers are Carried.

The average distance passengers are carried on the Baltimore and Ohio, is 42 miles; on the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western, 20 miles; on the Erie, 25 miles; on the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern, 54 miles; on the Lehigh Valley, 46 miles; on the New York Central and Hudson River, 33 miles; on the Pennsylvania, 24 miles; on the Pennsylvania Company, 28 miles; on the Philadelphia and Reading, 13 miles; on the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis, 31 miles. It will be seen that of these ten leading roads the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern has the greatest average distance, 54 miles. In general, the railroad having the greatest

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mileage connecting distant portions of the country by their systems will show the greatest average distance for each passenger carried.

In consolidated table G will be found interesting data on this subject. Some of the smaller roads, or those whose mileage is small will show a small average in the distance each passenger is carried. For instance, on the Brownstone and Middletown the average distance is 2 miles; on the Bangor and Portland 7 miles; on the Corn. wall and Lebanon 11 miles; on the Ligonier Valley 7 miles; on the Middletown and Hummelstown 5 miles; on the Mt. Jewett, Kinzua and Riterville 7 miles, while the New York, Chicago and St. Louis, a road paralleling the New York Central and Hudson River and the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern, practically owned by the Vanderbilt systems of railroads, shows the greatest average distance per passenger carried, 98 miles.

Passenger Revenue.

Referring to the classification showing the operations of the ten leading railroads, it is found that the passenger revenue of the Baltimore and Ohio is about 131 millions of dollars; of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western, 53 millions of dollars; of the Erie, 8 millions; of the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern, 8 millions; of the Lehigh Valley, 4 millions; of the New York Central and Hudson River, 264 millions; of the Pennsylvania, 28 millions; of the Pennsylvania Company, 6} millions; of the Philadelphia and Reading 61 millions, and of the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis 63 millions.

The total passenger revenue of all railroads reporting to this office is $139,647,284. In 1901 the total was $97,000,000; in 1902 it was $113,000,000; in 1903, $120,000,000; in 1904, $124,000,000; in 1905, $128,000,000. These figures denote a substantial increase in the passenger earnings of the railroads whose reports are filed in this office. No new lines of any moment are included in the data compiled and the figures indicate the actual increase of passenger earnings on the railroads whose reports were filed five years ago, from 97 millions of dollars then to 1394 millions of dollars for the year covered by this report.

Average Amount Received from Each Passenger.

From the total passenger revenue, and taking also into consideration the number of passengers carried, it is easy to determine the average amount received from each passenger. Here are found disparities which compare somewhat with the disparities which exist in the column showing the average distance passengers are carried. On the Baltimore and Ohio the average amount received from each passenger is 84 cents; on the Delaware, Lackawanna and Westeru, 28 cents; on the Erie, 36 cents; on the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern, $1.09; on the Lehigh Valley, 79 cents; on the New York Central and Hudson River, 57 cents; on the Pennsylvania, 48 cents; on the Pennsylvania Company, 56 cents; on the Philadelphia and Reading, 20 cents; on the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis, 62 cents, the average amount received per passenger by these ten companies being the highest on the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern.

A GLANCE AT THE AVERAGE RECEIPTS PER PASSENGER PER MILE AND THEIR RELATION TO THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A MAXIMUM RATE OF TWO CENTS PER MILE FOR THE TRANSPORTATION OF PASSENGERS.

From the single mileage basis denoting the number of passengers carried one mile, together with the total amount of passenger revenue, may be ascertained the average receipts per passenger per mile.

By making the computation as above indicated, it is found that the average receipts per passenger per mile on the roads reporting to this office for the year covered by this report are 1.84 cents. Six years ago the average receipts per passenger per mile were 1.852 cents; in 1902, 1.823 cents; in 1903, 1.861 cents; in 1904, 1.847 cents and in 1905, 1.88 cents.

From these figrres it would seem that there has been a decrease in six years in the average amount received per passenger per mile of .012 of a cent, but when comparison is made with the year ending June 30, 1905, it is found that there is a decrease of .040 of a cent.

No data at hand enable us to satisfactorily account for the ap. parent falling off in a single year of .040 of a cent per passenger per mile in the passenger revenue. It is certainly not due to a reduction of the rate from three cents to two and one-half cents per mile, or to the change which has come in the regulation of the use of the mileage books, for those changes did not occur until after the 30th of June and in a period not covered by this report. The change of .040 of a cent per passenger per mile involves a very large amount of money in the revenue of transportation companies, at least those whose passenger traffic is sufficiently large to be counted by the millions.

It can be seen that in years in which there are large assemblages of people under society organizations in different parts of the country, during which low rate tickets are sold, or in years in which there are political campaigns, both National and State, involving the selling of a great number of excursion tickets, these things would

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