Famous Orators of the World and Their Best Orations

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W. E. Scull, 1902 - 639 pages
Charles Morris assumed the massive undertaking of writing an account and explanation of the world's best orators and their orations. Included within this volume are speeches by Samuel Adams, Patrick Henry, John Quincy Adams, Alexander Hamilton and many, many more. He has organized the speakers by era and nation, creating an invaluable resource for study and insight.
 

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Page 298 - Not as the conqueror comes They, the true-hearted, came ; Not with the roll of the stirring drums, And the trumpet that sings of fame. Not as the flying come, In silence and in fear ; — They shook the depths of the desert gloom, With their hymns of lofty cheer.
Page 21 - Are we disposed to be of the number of those who, having eyes, see not, and having ears, hear not the things which so nearly concern their temporal salvation? For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it may cost, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst, and to provide for it. 2. I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
Page 22 - It is in vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry, Peace, Peace — but there is no peace. The war is actually begun! The next gale that sweeps from the north will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms! Our brethren are already in the field! Why stand we here idle? What is it that gentlemen wish ? What would they have ? Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery ? Forbid it, Almighty God ! I know not what course others may take;...
Page 87 - I have not allowed myself, Sir, to look beyond the union, To see what might lie hidden in the dark recess behind. I have not coolly weighed the chances of preserving liberty when the bonds that unite us together shall be broken asunder. I have not accustomed myself to hang over the precipice of disunion, to see whether, with my short sight, I can fathom the depth of the abyss below...
Page 21 - No, Sir, she has none. They are meant for us : they can be meant for no other. They are sent over to bind and rivet upon us those chains, which the British ministry have been so long forging.
Page 21 - We have held the subject up in every light of which it is capable; but it has been all in vain. Shall we resort to entreaty and humble supplication? What terms shall we find, which have not been already exhausted? Let us not, I beseech you, sir, deceive ourselves longer. Sir, we have done everything that could be done, to avert the storm which is now coming on. We have petitioned; we have remonstrated; we have supplicated; we have prostrated ourselves before the throne, and have implored its interposition...
Page 185 - YE have heard that it hath been said, Thou shalt love thy neighbor, and hate thine enemy : But I say unto you, Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them that despitefully use you, and persecute you...
Page 22 - Sir, we are not weak, if we make a proper use of those means which the God of nature hath placed in our power. Three millions of people, armed in the holy cause of liberty, and in such a country as that which we possess, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us.
Page 218 - Having behind us the producing masses of this nation and the world, supported by the commercial interests, the laboring interests, and the toilers everywhere, we will answer their demand for a gold standard by saying to them : You shall not press down upon the brow of labor this crown of thorns, you shall not crucify mankind upon a cross of gold.
Page 422 - Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears ; I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. The evil that men do lives after them ; The good is oft interred with their bones ; So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus Hath told you Caesar was ambitious : If it were so, it was a grievous fault ; And grievously hath Caesar answered it.

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