The Personal Equation

Front Cover
Chicago, 1910 - 248 pages
 

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Page 66 - If a man can write a better book, preach a better sermon, or make a better mousetrap than his neighbor, though he builds his house in the woods, the world will make a beaten path to his door.
Page 88 - But were his the best, He could not work for two. My work is mine, And, heresy or not, if my hand slacked I should rob God - since He is fullest good Leaving a blank instead of violins. I say, not God Himself can make man's best Without best men to help Him.
Page 71 - All that I have accomplished, or expect, or hope to accomplish, has been and will be by that plodding, patient, persevering process of accretion which builds the ant-heap — particle by particle, thought by thought, fact by fact. And if...
Page 150 - I was confirmed in this opinion, that he, who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem...
Page 51 - What hast thou now in thy thoughts ? with perfect openness thou mightest immediately answer, This or That; so that from thy words it should be plain that everything in thee is simple and benevolent, and such as befits a social animal, and one that cares not for thoughts about...
Page 178 - Education does not mean teaching people to know what they do not know — it means teaching them to behave as they do not behave.
Page 82 - Two men I honour, and no third. First, the toilworn Craftsman that with earth-made Implement laboriously conquers the earth, and makes her man's. Venerable to me is the hard Hand; crooked, coarse; wherein notwithstanding lies a cunning virtue indefeasibly royal, as of the Sceptre of this Planet. Venerable too is the rugged face, all weather-tanned, besoiled, with its rude intelligence; for it is the face of a Man living manlike.
Page 61 - The world embraces not • only a Newton, but a Shakespeare — not only a Boyle, but a Raphael — not only a Kant, but a Beethoven— not only a Darwin, but a Carlyle. Not in each of these, but in all, is human nature whole. They are not opposed, but supplementary — not mutually exclusive, but reconcilable.
Page 60 - They have imposed on themselves a code of conventional decencies as absurd as that which has been the bane of the French drama. The most characteristic and interesting circumstances are omitted or softened down, because, as we are told, they are too trivial for the majesty of history.
Page 88 - Twixt chin and hand a violin of mine, He will be glad that Stradivari lived, Made violins, and made them of the best. The masters only know whose work is good : pay They will choose mine, and while God gives them skill I give them instruments to play upon, God choosing me to help Him.

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