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THE FOUNTAIN OF ABUNDANCE

By Philip Martiny descent will do well to study. The been admirably stated by its President, Exposition is American in broad and Mr. John G. Milburn, in these significant friendly contrast with all that is European; words: it is an exposition of the arts, industries,

So much could not have been accomplished and life of the New World from the fur- but for the association of the Exposition with thest north to the furthest south; it is a a grand idea-the bringing closer together of record of the spiritual history of the early the peoples of this hemisphere in their social,

That native races, of the English, the Scotch, aspect of it has been the inspiration of the the Irish in Canada and the United States, enterprise and the source of the enthusiasm of the French, the Spanish, the Portuguese which has carried it forward to completion. in Central and South America. These It is assured of permanent results in the new races, in their racial integrity or in their between those peoples which are bound to

and closer ties of amity, interest, and sympathy long mingling with one another, are the spring from it and to stamp it as an historical builders of the Pan-American Exposition; event. And in it is the fairest promise that it is the work of their hands, and it is, the hope will be realized so nobly expressed therefore, a revelation of their spirit.

in the inscription on the Propylæa," that the

century now begun may unite in the bonds of The shaping idea of the Exposition has peace, knowledge, good will, friendship, and

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THE MINES BUILDING AND MIRROR LAKE

Drawn by A. Fleury.

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THE TEMPLE OF MUSIC AND WEST ESPLANADE

Drawn by A. Fleury.

noble emulation all the dwellers on the conti- craft rounds the first point of dense foliage, nents and islands of the New World."

high above the great mass of green in the The setting of the Exposition could foreground rise the striking equestrian hardly be more attractive or the approach figures on the columns of the bridge, full to it more beautiful. Buffalo is not only of a noble freedom and energy, the dome one of the most comfortable cities in the of the government building, and the eleccountry in the summer, but it is also one trical tower. This first glimpse of the of the most finished and restful. The Exposition strikes the keynote of grace, section given up to homes is not without lightness, and harmony; the striking architectural monstrosities—no modern figures against the clear sky and the blue city here or abroad is free from abomina- of the domes give one a sense of elation, tions of this kind; but its broad avenues as if something ethereal and magical were shaded with trees of substantial growth at hand. The first view of the grounds and girth, its commodious and amply reveals the simplicity and symmetry of the planned homes surrounded by generous structural scheme, and conveys at the outlawns, the ripeness of nature enfolding a set its deeper significance; for it is in the highly civilized life, give the city a first whole, as it unifies and co-ordinates the place among American towns. So rich is parts, that the meaning of the Exposition the foliage on Delaware Avenue and the is to be sought. There are almost countneighboring streets for several miles that less exhibits of products, industries, one finds himself in the Park without methods, and inventions; the means, tools, any sense of abrupt transition.

and appliances of an immensely diversified The Exposition ought to be approached, industrial and commercial life; and there for the first time at least, through the is a vast amount of that incidental adverdrives or walks of the Park, which bring tising which is as old as the oldest fair in one to the lake, where a steam launch the Orient; but there is no hint of utility conveys the visitor swiftly to the main detached from beauty, of commercialism entrance to the grounds. As the little divorced from altruism, of industry divided

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THE APPROACH TO THE TRIUMPHAL BRIDGE

Photograph by C. D. Arnold. from art, in the ordered harmony of the touched by the sun with a beauty which structure of the Exposition ; that shares lives in the subtle commingling of light in and recalls the higher activities of and spray, and vanishes to be rekindled humanity among all races; it may be moment by moment in endless variety of regarded as a symbol of the co-ordination gathering, dispersing, and foaming loveliof interests in this country in some future ness. From this great vista what may be when we shall have worked through the called transepts expand the foreground distinctively commercial stage into some- on either side, with rich masses of flowers thing higher and more inclusive.

breaking the long distances. The landThe Exposition is, fortunately, much scape effects are skillfully produced, and more compact than its predecessors, and give the buildings a charming setting of permits, therefore, the working out of a verdure and color. The Paris Exposition unity which is grasped at a glance. The of 1888 was larger but far less effective noble causeway, flanked by great towers as a whole ; the Exposition in the same with rich shields swinging between, pre city last summer was so vast and so widely pares the eye for the long vista of the scattered on both sides of the Seine that Court of Fountains closed by the tower, artistic unity was impossible of achievefrom which a stream gushes as if to feed ment; it was a vast aggregation of exhibits, all the rising and falling masses of water, housed in a great number of buildings,

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