Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, Volumes 9-10

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New Jersey Historical Society, 1864
Issues for Oct. 1927 and Oct. 1930 contain sections of a serial article by John C. Honeyman on the history of Zion, St. Paul and other early Lutheran churches in New Jersey.
 

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Page 174 - United States, in Congress assembled, for the defence of such State or its trade; nor shall any body of forces be kept up by any State, in time of peace, except such number only as, in the judgment of the United States, in Congress assembled, shall be deemed requisite to garrison the forts necessary for the defence of such State...
Page 184 - ... and by that name they and their successors for ever hereafter shall and may have succession, and by that name shall and may be persons in law, capable to sue and be sued, plead and be impleaded, answer and be answered unto, defend and be defended...
Page 175 - We hold these truths to be self evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.
Page 173 - America, agree to certain articles of confederation and perpetual union between the states of New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. ... ARTICLE 1. The style of this confederacy shall be "The United States of America.
Page 38 - All men are by nature free and independent, and have certain inalienable rights, among which are those of enjoying and defending life and liberty; acquiring, possessing, and protecting property; and pursuing and obtaining safety- and happiness.
Page 174 - ... well and truly to hear and determine the matter in question, according to the best of his judgment, without favour affection or hope of reward:" provided also that no state shall be deprived of territory for the- benefit of the united states.
Page 14 - An act for granting certain duties in the British colonies and plantations in America; for allowing a drawback of the duties of customs upon the exportation from this kingdom, of coffee and...
Page 175 - We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, among which are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness...
Page 103 - Hudson's River, and hath upon the west Delaware Bay or River, and extendeth southward to the main ocean as far as Cape May, at the mouth of Delaware Bay, and to the northward as far as the northernmost branch of the said Bay or River of Delaware, which is forty-one degrees and forty minutes of latitude, and crosseth over thence in a strait line to Hudson's River in forty-one degrees of latitude...
Page 175 - ... must decide that the property which existed in the crown of Great Britain, previous to the present Revolution, ought now to belong to the Congress, in trust for the use and benefit of the United States. They have fought and bled for it in proportion to their respective abilities ; and therefore the reward ought not to be predilectionally distributed. Shall such States as are shut out by situation from availing themselves of the least advantage from this quarter be left to sink under an enormous...

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