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English to make cheaper shoes than the Americans make because the average value per pair of imports was $5.72 while the average value of exports was $3.23.

Combed cotton yarns bleached to a value of $3,598,000 were imported compared with exports valued at $748,000. Yet it was evidently not the cheapness of the English yarns that led to their importation, since they cost $1.20 per pound compared with $0.96 per pound for the exported yarns. These yarns were imported because of their peculiar suitability for certain purposes, and price was a secondary consideration. The same relative values are found in imports and exports of many other classes of articles. The table discloses that the same principles are true with respect to the trade between the United States and Germany.

The following tables gives the unit import and export values in 1927 of 150 classes of articles which were imported and exported. The unit value is obtained by dividing the total value imported or exported by the total quantities imported or exported. In addition to the import and export unit values, the unit value of the domestic production is shown in some cases.

In 64 out of the 146 items the unit value of imports exceeds the unit value of exports, showing in such cases that the average article exported presumably cost less to produce than the average article imported. Of course the quality of the imported article is presumably superior. The table at least shows that the imports do not come in because they are cheaper than the average domestic article in the same class.

The table shows the unit value of domestic production for 44 items. But in 24 of these items the unit value of the imports was higher than the unit value of the domestic production.

Unit values of production, exports, and imports

Commodity

Paragraph

Unit

Year

Pro- Er duction ports

Im ports

0.127

0.0122

. 010

0.088
.012
.020
. 205
. 169
.046
. 202
. 283

.021 . 163 . 025

. 0257

. 036

...do.

1. 10

. 098

.141
060
073

. 175 . 177 .086

. 106 . 106

. 080

. 051

.061

...do.

Schedule 1:

Oleic acid or red oil.
Aluminum sulphate..
Ammonium sulphate.
Blackings, paste.
Bleaching powder.
Calcium carbide.
Dyes and colors.
Vulcanized fiber.
Logwood extract.
Quercitron..
Osage orange
Tanning extract.
Flavoring extract.
Formaldehyde.
Gelatin.
Ink, printers.
Ink, other.
Linseed oil.
All other expressed and extracted oil.
Coconut oil.
Cottonseed oil.
Soybean oil.
Hydrogenated oils and fats..
Peppermint oil.
Plasters..
Red lead..
White lead.
Zinc oxide and leaded zinc oxide.
Lithopone.
Potassium

Sodium bicarbonate i Tarifi Act of 1922.

1 Pounds.
6 ...do...
7 ...do.
13 do.
14

.do.
16 ..do.
28
32 ....do.
39 ....do.
39 ...do.
39 ...do.
39 .do.
40 .do.
41
42

..do.
44

....do. 44 ..do.. 54 ..do. 54

.do.
55

..do...
55 ...do..
55 ..do...
57 do.
59 ..do.
66 ..do.
74 ..do.
74 .do.
79 .do.
79

..do..
--...do..
83 l.....do....

1928
1928 (1926)

1928
1928

1928
1928 (1925)

1928

1928
1928 (1925)
1928 (1925)
1928 (1925)

1928
1928
1928
1928
1928
1928
1928
1928
1928
1928
1928
1928
1928

1928
1928 (1927)
1928 (1927)

1928
1928 (1927)

1926
1927

.897
.084
.652
. 129
.382
. 116

087
.005
. 114
. 106
. 134
3. 420
1. 173
.088
.074
.063
.051
.061
.018

.803
.046
.766
.511
.384
. 081
.090
.079
. 134
.062

.090

. 200

3. 289

4. 129 1. 234

.089

.117

加的小48888

. 061 .096 .066 . 025 . 177 .on2

.048

.015

Unit values of production, exports, and imports-Continued

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Schedule 1-Continued.

Sodium carbonate, calcined
Borax, refined..
Sal soda..
Sodium chromate.
Sodium hydroxide.

Dextrine.
Schedule 2:

Plate glass.

Incandescent electric-light lamps.
Schedule 3:

Tungsten and ferrotungsten..
Plates and skelp...
Wire rods.
Iron or steel wire, plain.
Iron or steel wire, galvanized.
Wire strand and rope.
Galvanized wire fencing.
Ball and roller bearings.
Chains..
Bolts, nuts, washers.
Cut nails and spikes.
Horseshoe nails.
Wire nails and spikes.
Wood screws of iron and steel.
Metallic pens..
Files and rasps..
Pistols and revolvers.
Cotton-yarn machinery.
Silk-yarn machinery.
Shovels and spades..
Aluminum, crudo, metal and alloys.
Aluminum, plates and sheets.
Aluminum, mouldings,
Copper pipes and tubing.
Copper plates and sheets..
Brass and bronze tubes.
Brass and bronze rods, bars, plates.
Mercury.
Types.
Nickel and alloys.

Lead pigs, bars, etc..
Schedule 7:

Chcese.
Honey.
Salmon..
Salmon, mild-cured.
Fish packed in oil..
Barley, hulled or unhulled.
Buckwheat..
Buckwheat, four.
Macaroni, vermicelli, noodles.
Qats.
Oatmeal, rolled oats.
Rice
Rice flour
Rye..
Rye flour..
Biscuits and crackers
Apples, dried.
Apples, prepared or preserved.
Apricots..
Cider
Raisins.
Lemons.
Oranges
Grapefruit.
Peaches.
Peaches, dried.
Plums, prunes dried.
All jellies, jams, marmalades
Peanuts shelled and unshelled.
Grass seed, alfalfa..
Red clover seed..
Other clover seeds..
Timothy seeds..
Dried beans.
Canned beans.
Peas dried..
Canned tomatoes.
Canned asparagus.
Coffee substitutes.

373 374 374 374 381 381 381 381 386 389 380 393

. 258
. 216
.247

997

186
.248
.397
. 256
215
253
. 205
1. 190

1, 225

.577 .368

do..

.046

.094 .552 .875 ..040

.304
.256
. 113

116
. 176
1. 025
1. 810
.023
. 108
.655

. 409

. 100

.054

.864 5. 73

.013 .037 1.095 4.82

. 105

. 304 . 047

do.

710 do.
716

do
717 .do
718 do
720 do
722 Barrels.
723 do.
723 Pounds.
725

do 726 Barrels

Pounds. 727

do.
727

do
728 Barrels
728 do.
733 Pounds.
734 .do.
734 do.
735
738 Gallon
7-12 Pounds.
743 do
743 do.
743 do.
7445 do.
745 do.

do
7-18 do.
757 do.
761 do
761
761 do.
761 do
763 Barrels.
703 Pounds.
767 Barrels
770 Pounds
773 do.
774 do.

1928 1929 1928

1928 1928 (1927)

1928 1923 1925 1929 1928

1928 1928 (1925)

1928

1928 1928 (1925)

1928 1928 (1925)

1929 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928

1928 1928 (1925)

1928 1929 1928 1923 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928 1929 1928 1928

307
.090
. 161
.262
. 081
.825
.875
.051
.090
. 501
.051
. 038
. 038
1. 199
5. 96
. 186
.118
.054
. 145
.621
.056
.077
.071
..059
.033
.098
.061
.086
.096
. 188
. 145
. 169
.053
3. 43

.085
4. 038

064

. 191 .083 . 308 . 138 .031

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Unit values of production, exports, and importsContinued

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Schedule 7-Continued.

Cocoa butter...
Hay

Hops.
Schedule 9:

Cotton window hollands.
Oilcolths.
Filled cotton cloths.
Waterproof cloths.

Cotton hosiery-..
Schedule 10:

Jute yarns, cordage, and twine.
Cordage..
Jute bags and sacks.

Linoleum..
Schedule 11:

Yarn of wool or hair.
Wollen cloths.
Worsted cloth

Mohair cloth
Schedule 12:

Thrown silk
Sewing silk, twist, floss.
Silk pile fabrics.

Silk hosiery..
Schedule 13:

Box boards.
Sheathing and building paper..
Blotting paper.
Playing cards.

Boxes of paper or paper board.
Schedule 14:

Paint brushes
Pearl buttons.
Upholstery leather.
Bags, strap, case, and football leather..
Fancy leather.
Gas mantles.
Band instruments.
Dry plates.
Motion pictures-

Not exposed.
Negatives...
Positives..

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DEPARTMENT OF VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC, DISTRICT OF

COLUMBIA

COMMUNICATION

FROM

THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

TRANSMITTING

A SUPPLEMENTAL ESTIMATE OF APPROPRIATION FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, AMOUNTING TO $34,300

FEBRUARY 17 (calendar day, FEBRUARY 27), 1931.-Read, referred to the

Committee on Appropriations, and ordered to be printed

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, February 27, 1931. The PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE.

Sir: I have the honor to transmit herewith for the consideration of Congress a supplemental estimate of appropriation for the District of Columbia for the fiscal year 1932, amounting to $34,300.

The details of this estimate, the necessity therefor, and the reason for its transmission at this time are set forth in the letter of the Director of the Bureau of the Budget transmitted herewith, with whose comments and observations thereon I concur. Respectfully,

HERBERT HOOVER.

BUREAU OF THE BUDGET,

Washington, February 21, 1931. Sir: I have the honor to submit for your consideration a supplemental estimate of appropriation for the District of Columbia for the fiscal year 1932, amounting to $34,300, as follows:

Department of vehicles and traffic, District of Columbia: For personal servo ices, fiscal year 1932, $34,300, together with the amount of $36,060 for personal services, office of the director of traffic, contained in the District of Columbia

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