Human Rights and International Relations

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Cambridge University Press, 1986 - 186 pages
This book is about the impact of human rights on the relations among states. It seeks to bring together in one place an account of the theory of human rights (what they are; where they come from; whether they are universal); a discussion of the part they play in contemporary international politics (including East/West and North/South relations); and a view of what ought to be done about them--especially by the Western powers. Dr. Vincent recommends that provision for subsistence rights has a strong claim to priority over other human rights. Dr. Vincent's conclusion neither endorses the notion of the advance of cosmopolitan values in the society of states, nor rests on an observation of the continuing strength of state society. He shows how the grip of the sovereign state might in fact be tightened by its successful co-option of the international doctrine of human rights. Published in association with the Royal Institute of International Affairs.

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Contents

The idea of human rights
7
Human rights in western political thought
19
Human rights and cultural relativism
37
PRACTICE
59
Human rights in EastWest relations
61
Human rights in NorthSouth relations
76
Human rights in contemporary world society
92
POLICY
109
Human rights and the theory of international relations
111
Human rights in foreign policy
129
Notes
153
Index
179
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