The Changing Architecture of Politics: Structure, Agency and the Future of the State

Front Cover
SAGE, 1990 M02 13 - 288 pages
This original analysis of structuration, agency and the state offers an incisive explanation of the changing nature of the state.

Cerny argues that the state is not being transcended; the architecture of politics is not moving beyond the nation-state despite the emergence of transnational structures. He points to the movement of many states towards the model of the competition state', and away from the model of welfare state', as the major contemporary change in the role of the state. He asserts that new forms of political action will have to evolve if the state itself is to be controlled and used for the pursuit of deeper human values in the 21st century.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Elements of Structure
26
Markets Hierarchies
56
Structuring the field
85
Changing Patterns of Political Structuration
111
Patterns
147
Dedifferentiation
181
from
204
Political Structuration and Political Ideas
233
Select Bibliography
248
Index
257
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 149 - Corporatism can be defined as a system of interest representation in which the constituent units are organized into a limited number of singular, compulsory, noncompetitive, hierarchically ordered and functionally differentiated categories, recognized or licensed (if not created) by the state and granted a deliberate representational monopoly within their respective categories in exchange for observing certain controls on their selection of leaders and articulation of demands and supports.
Page 149 - Schmitter argues that corporatism can be defined as a system of interest representation in which the constituent units are organized into a limited number of singular, compulsory, noncompetitive, hierarchically ordered and functionally differentiated categories, recognized or licensed (if not created) by the state and granted a deliberate representational monopoly within their respective categories...
Page 247 - The Nature of Belief Systems in Mass Publics," in David E. Apter (ed.), Ideology and Discontent (New York: Free Press, 1964), pp.
Page 252 - Arend Lijphart, The Politics of Accommodation: Pluralism and Democracy in the Netherlands...
Page 202 - Thomas P. Hughes, Networks of Power: Electrification in Western Society, 1880-1930 (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1983). See also Thomas P. Hughes. "The Evolution of Large Technological Systems," in The Social Construction of Technological Systems: New Directions in the Sociology and History of Technology, ed.
Page 149 - Pluralism can be defined as a system of interest representation in which the constituent units are organized into an unspecified number of multiple, voluntary, competitive, nonhierarchically ordered and self-determined (as to type or scope of interest) categories which are not specially licensed, recognized, subsidized, created or otherwise controlled in leadership selection or interest articulation by the state and which do not exercise a monopoly of representational activity within their respective...
Page 54 - Murray Edelman, The Symbolic Uses of Politics (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1964...
Page 62 - The common characteristic which distinguishes all of the large economic groups with significant lobbying organizations is that these groups are also organized for some other purpose. The large and powerful economic lobbies are in fact the byproducts of organizations that obtain their strength and support because they perform some function in addition to lobbying for collective goods. The lobbies of the large economic groups are the by-products of organizations that have the capacity to 'mobilize'...
Page 202 - Peter Bachrach and Morton S. Baratz, Power and Poverty: Theory and Practice (New York: Oxford University Press, 1970), p.
Page 253 - William H. Riker, The Theory of Political Coalitions (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1962); Sven Groennings, SW Kelley, and Michael Leiserson, eds., The Study of Coalition Behavior (New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1970); and William Gamson, "A Theory of Coalition Formation," American Sociological Review 26 (June 1961): 373-82.

Bibliographic information