Theodore Roosevelt: The Citizen

Front Cover
Outlook Company, 1904 - 471 pages
One of the people affected by Jacob Riis' work was Theodore Roosevelt, who at the time was working as the police commissioner in New York City. After reading Riis' articles, Roosevelt became aware of the terrible conditions that New York's poor was living in. Roosevelt asked Riis to show him around the tenements and back alleys of the city. After their tour of the slums, Roosevelt gained a great respect for Riis, going so far as to call him "New York's most useful citizen." Riis himself came to respect Roosevelt as well, and even wrote a biography of the president's life. Riis' Theodore Roosevelt details every aspect of Roosevelt's life from his youth and childhood to his time as president. The book also contains a useful list of books written by Theodore Roosevelt and an assortment of images to accompany the text.

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Page 418 - I wish to preach, not the doctrine of ignoble ease, but the doctrine of the strenuous life, the life of toil and effort, of labor and strife; to preach that highest form of success which comes, not to the man who desires mere easy peace, but to the man who does not shrink from danger, from hardship, or from bitter toil, and who out of these wins the splendid ultimate triumph.
Page 412 - In life, as in a football game, the principle to follow is: Hit the line hard; don't foul and don't shirk, but hit the line hard.
Page 379 - No person shall be refused employment or in any way discriminated against on account of membership or nonmembership in any labor organization, and there should be no discriminating against or interference with any employee who is not a member of a labor organization by members of such organization.
Page 380 - I am President of all the people of the United States without regard to creed, color, birthplace, occupation, or social condition. My aim is to do equal and exact justice as among them all. In the employment and dismissal of men in the Government service, I can no more recognize the fact that a man does or does not belong to a union as being for or against him...
Page 421 - No man is justified in doing evil on the ground of expediency. He is bound to do all the good possible. Yet he must consider the question of expediency, in order that he may do all the good possible, for otherwise he will do none.
Page 422 - Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing...
Page 237 - We gird up our loins as a nation with the stern purpose to play our part manfully in winning the ultimate triumph ; and therefore we turn scornfully aside from the paths of mere ease and idleness, and with unfaltering steps tread the rough road of endeavor, smiting down the wrong and battling for the right as Greatheart smote and battled in Bunyan's immortal story.
Page 424 - We can not have too much immigration of the right kind, and we should have none at all of the wrong kind. The need is to devise some system by which undesirable immigrants shall be kept out entirely, while desirable immigrants are properly distributed throughout the country.
Page 87 - ... while I hurriedly jammed a couple of cartridges into the magazine, my rifle holding only four, all of which I had fired. Then he tried to pull up, but as he did so his muscles seemed suddenly to give way, his head drooped, and he rolled over and over like a shot rabbit. Each of my first three bullets had inflicted a mortal wound.
Page 173 - Like so many of the gallant fighters with whom it was later my good fortune to serve, he combined, in a very high degree, the qualities of entire manliness with entire uprightness and cleanliness of character. It was a pleasure to deal with a man of high ideals, who scorned everything mean and base, and who also possessed those robust and hardy qualities of body and mind, for the lack of which no merely negative virtue can ever atone.

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