The Theory and Practice of Banking, Volume 2

Front Cover
Longmans, Green, Reader, & Dyer, 1886

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Contents

Great rise in the market price of gold
39
Adoption by the Bank of England of
47
Evidence of Mr Chambers
49
Regolutions of Mr Vansittart
54
Opinion of a foreign merchant
55
Letter of Lord King
56
Opposed by Lord Grenville
57
Observations of Lord Stanhope
58
Great speculations and increase of country banks in 1813
60
Great destruction of country bank paper in 1816 rise in the foreign exchanges and fall in the market price of gold
61
Which is an example of the truth of the principles of the Bullion Report
62
Partial resumption of cash payments in 1816
63
The same continued
64
Opinion of Mr Dorrein Governor of the Bank
65
Opinion of Mr Pole DeputyGovernor of the Bank
66
Opinion of Mr Haldimand Director of the Bank
67
The same continued
71
Opinion of Mr Samuel Thornton late Director of the Bank
72
Opinion of Mr Thomas Tooke 121 Opinion of Mr Ricardo
75
Opinion of Mr Baring
77
The same continued
79
Reports of the Committees to both Houses
80
Ministerial resolutions
81
Speeches of Lord Lauderdale and Lord King
83
Rejection of the Bullion ReportMr Peel votes with
90
CHAPTER XI
96
Proposal for the equitable adjustment of contracts
102
Position of the Bank in 18333435
138
CHAPTER XII
150
Errors committed by him
151
Continuation of Sir Robert Peels speech
152
Unfairness of his illustration
153
Continuation of Sir Robert Peels speech
155
Further proposals of Sir Robert Peel
156
Extract from Sir Charles Woods speech
157
Incorrect to say that the Act of 1844 is the complement of the Act of 1819
161
Great error of writers who think that prices must vary exactly with the amount of the Currency
162
The Bank Act shewn to be subject to the same radical vice as the bank principle of 1832
165
Passes off after the first week of May
167
Great failures in the Autumn of 1847
168
The Government letter authorising the Bank of England to issue notes beyond the limits prescribed by the Act of 1814
170
Extraordinary aid afforded by the Bank of England to Com mercial houses in the Autumn of 1847
171
Meeting of Parliament in November 1847
172
Speech of Sir Robert Peel
175
The same continued
176
Opinion of the Governor and DeputyGovernor of the Bank of England on the Act of 1844
177
Mr Gurneys opinion
178
Mr Loyds opinion
179
Mr Glyns opinion
180
Comparative view of the bullion and the rate of discount of the Bank of England during 1855
182
Judicious conduct of the Bank during this drain
183
Pressure in 1856
184
Improved management of the Bank
185
Commencement of the crisis of 1857
186
Increase of the panic
187
Evidence of the Governor
188
Notes issued in excess of the Act
190
Pressure in 1863 and 1864
191
Bank of England joins the Clearing House
192
Third Suspension of the Bank Charter Act
193
Great Bank failures
195
Remarkable difference between the rates of discount of the Banks of England and France
196
CHAPTER XIII
198
Rivalry to the Bank
199
The Bank issues 1 notes
200
Proposals to the Bank
201
The Commercial Bank founded in 1810
218
Palmer i 221 223
221
285
242
CHAPTER XIV
243
The same continued
249
its being limited to that single instance
268
Fallacy of the expression good bills
275
Historical proof of the fallacy of this theory
282
CHAPTER XV
287
Judicial decisions as to the meaning of Currency
293
All Negotiable Instruments are Currency
304
AttorneyGen 456 494
307
Writers who include Bank Credits as Currency
312
Speech of the Marquis of Titchfield 106
313
Lord Overstone on Currency
317
Colonel Torrens on Currency
323
Conversion of Peel to the Currency principle
338
On the causes which compelled the Suspension of the Bank
348
2 The Restrictive Theory
355
The Rate of Discount is the true Supreme Power
365
Joint Stock Banks founded in London
385
1
402
Trading customers
405
Nature of Banking
408
Relation of Banker to customer as Pawnee of banking securities
410
On Short Bills
412
Relation of Banker to customer as Warehouseman of his plate jewels specie deeds securities c
413
Bankers as Agents or Correspondents of other bankers
415
On Banking Investments
419
On discounting Bills of Exchange
420
Advances on loan with security
424
Advances by way of Cash Credits and Overdrawn Accounts
427
Bill brokers
429
On the Clearing System
435
On the Edinburgh Clearing House
437
On the London Clearing House
443
CHAPTER XIX
448
On Goods taken as Security
452
Policies of Life Assurance taken as Securities
453
On Title D taken as Security
455
On Securities by third persons
459
On Dock Warrants and Bills of Lading
462
The Factors Act
463
Factors Acts limited to mercantile transactions
469
253
470
Factors Acts Amendment Act 1877
472
On Bills of Lading
474
Bills of Lading Amendment Act 1855
476
CHAPTER XX
478
Definitions and General Principles
480
On the Transfer of a Credit or Debt
481
Examination of the modern opinions on Currency
492
Consequences of these doctrines
498
19
510
The most celebrated examples of Lawism
511
99
516
Capacity and authority of parties
526
Ingram
536
The Sea Fire Life
537
Accounts of the French Assignats
547
The same continued
558
Hynson
573
330
579
Heath
585
329
587

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 488 - Where the instrument contains or a person adds to his signature words indicating that he signs for or on behalf of a principal, or in a representative capacity, he is not liable on the instrument if he was duly authorized; but the mere addition of words describing him as an agent, or as filling a representative character, without disclosing his principal, does not exempt him from personal liability.
Page 500 - Partial, that is to say, an acceptance to pay part only of the amount for which the bill is drawn ; 3.
Page 494 - In the hands of any holder other than a holder in due course, a negotiable instrument is subject to the same defenses as if it were non-negotiable. But a holder who derives his title through a holder in due course, and who is not himself a party to any fraud or illegality affecting the instrument, has all the rights of such former holder in respect of all parties prior to the latter.
Page 478 - Where a banker in good faith and without negligence receives payment for a customer of a cheque crossed generally or specially to himself, and the customer has no title, or a defective title, thereto, the banker shall not incur any liability to the true owner of the cheque by reason only of having received such payment.
Page 346 - ... any body politic or corporate whatsoever created or to be created, or for any other persons whatsoever united or to be united in covenants or partnership exceeding the number of six persons in that part of Great Britain called England, to borrow, owe, or take up any sum or sums of money on their bills or notes payable on demand or at any less time than six months from the borrowing thereof...
Page 488 - But if any such instrument, after completion, is negotiated to a holder in due course, it is valid and effectual for all purposes in his hands, and he may enforce it as if it had been filled up strictly in accordance with the authority given and within a reasonable time.
Page 535 - Interest thereon from the time of presentment for payment if the bill is payable on demand, and from the maturity of the bill in any other case : (c.) The expenses of noting, or, when protest is necessary, and the protest has been extended, the expenses of protest.
Page 528 - Notice of dishonor may be waived, either before the time of giving notice has arrived, or after the omission to give due notice, and the waiver may be express or implied.
Page 527 - Where the instrument has been dishonored in the hands of an agent, he may either himself give notice to the parties liable thereon, or he may give notice to his principal. If he give notice to his principal, he must do so within the same time as if he were the holder, and the principal upon the receipt of such notice has himself the same time for giving notice as if the agent had been an independent holder.
Page 437 - Act had not passed), to pass and transfer the legal right to such debt or chose in action from the date of such notice, and all legal and other remedies for the same, and the power to give a good discharge for the same, without the concurrence of the assignor...

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