The Early Chinese Empires

Front Cover
Harvard University Press, 2009 M06 30 - 333 pages
In 221 B.C. the First Emperor of Qin unified what would become the heart of a Chinese empire whose major features would endure for two millennia. In the first of a six-volume series on the history of imperial China, Lewis highlights the key challenges facing the court officials and scholars who set about governing an empire of such scale and diversity.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - stillatim - LibraryThing

I have never felt so much the dirty, smelly Westerner that I am as while I was reading the opening chapters of this book. While my ancestors were eating chestnuts, probably raw, and fighting a rear ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jonfaith - LibraryThing

This is smart but austere survey of the first two dynasties of China, dating from 221 BC to 220 AD. The Qin and Han Dynasties arose from the bedlam of the Warring States, a sort of perpetual civil war ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
1 The Geography of Empire
5
2 A State Organized for War
30
3 The Paradoxes of Empire
51
4 Imperial Cities
75
5 Rural Society
102
6 The Outer World
128
7 Kinship
155
9 Literature
206
10 Law
227
Conclusion
253
Dates and Usage
267
Acknowledgments
270
Notes
271
Bibliography
292
Index
309

8 Religion
178

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