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SLAVERY,

The Punishment of Man's Sin,

ITS REMEDY,

THE GOSPEL OF CHRIST,

AN ARGUMENT BEFORE THE GENERAL SYNOD OF THE
REFORMED PROTESTANT DUTCH CHURCH,

OCTOBER, 1855.

BY SAMUEL B. HOW, D. D.

PASTOR OF THE FIRST REFORMED DUTCH CHURCH, NEW-BRUNSWICK, N. J.

SECOND EDITION.

New-Brunswick, N. J.:

JOHN TERHUNE, 31 ALBANY STREET;
NEW-YORK: R. & R. BRINKERHOFF, 103 FULTON STREET,

J. TERHUNE'S PRESS, NEW-BRUNSWICK.

1856.

ENTERED according to Act of Congress, in the year 1855, by
HENRY K. HOW,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States, for the
Southern District of New-York.

A RELATION

OF CIRCUMSTANCES THAT CALLED FORTH THE FOLLOWING

ADDRESS.

THE Author of the following address to the General Synod of the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church of North America, deems it proper to state: that at the meeting of the Synod in the City of New-Brunswick in June last, "a communication was received from the North Carolina Classis of the German Reformed Church, purporting to be a certified copy of their action in reference to seeking an ecclesiastical connection with the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church, which was referred to the Committee on Correspondence," of which he was the chairman. That committee recommended to Synod the adoption of the following resolution:

"Resolved, That Synod cordially reciprocate the fraternal feelings expressed by the Classis of North Carolina of the German Reformed Church; that they regard with favor their proposal of effecting an ecclesiastical relation with our Church; and that so soon as they present duly authenticated testimonials of their accepting its standards and constitution, they shall be received as one of its integral parts, and so be fully incorporated with it, and shall be known among us as the German Reformed Classis of North Carolina, of the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church of North America."

The Report recommending this resolution was accepted. But when it was moved to adopt the above resolution, debate followed, and it was discussed at some length; when Rev. Thornton Butler, who had been recognized by Synod as the Commissioner from the North Carolina Classis, perceiving from the debate that several members of the Synod were opposed to forming a connection with them, withdrew the appli cation of the Classis. He was afterwards requested, by a resolution of the Synod, to "reconsider the withdrawal of his papers, and leave them in the hands of the Synod until their meeting in October next: whereupon he consented to leave them in the hands of the Synod, subject to the advice of his Classis." According to the report of the New-York Tribune, of June 16, 1855, there were two principal objections raised against the receiving of the Classis by the Synod; the one was, that it was inexpedient to do so, because it would endanger the peace of the Church, and expose it to being distracted by the agitation of the question of slavery. This was urged by Rev. Dr. Wyckoff, of Albany, and Rev. Dr. Bethune, of Brooklyn. The other was, that slaveholding is a sin, and that we ought not to hold communion with slaveholders. This objection was urged by Rev. Isaac G. Duryee, of Schenectady, who said, that he had "conscientious scruples against the formation of such a relation." According to the Tribune, he declared

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