Primary Education, Volume 13

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Educational Publishing Company, 1905

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Page 437 - WHO HAS SEEN THE WIND? Who has seen the wind ? Neither I nor you ; But when the leaves hang trembling The wind is passing through. Who has seen the wind ? Neither you nor I ; But when the trees bow down their heads The wind is passing by.
Page 486 - They do me wrong who say I come no more When once I knock and fail to find you in; For every day I stand outside your door, And bid you wake, and rise to fight and win. Wail not for precious chances passed away, Weep not for golden ages on the wane; Each night I burn the records of the day; At sunrise every soul is born again.
Page 486 - Weep not for golden ages on the wane! Each night I burn the records of the day; At sunrise every soul is born again. Laugh like a boy at splendors that have sped, To vanished joys be blind and deaf and dumb; My judgments seal the dead past with its dead, But never bind a moment yet to come. Tho' deep in mire, wring not your hands and weep; I lend my arm to all who say, "I can!
Page 35 - All night by the white stars' frosty gleams He groined his arches and matched his beams ; Slender and clear were his crystal spars As the lashes of light that trim the stars ; He sculptured every summer delight In his halls and chambers out of sight; Sometimes his tinkling waters slipt...
Page 35 - Down swept the chill wind from the mountain peak, From the snow five thousand summers old; On open wold and hill-top bleak It had gathered all the cold, And whirled it like sleet on the wanderer's cheek; It carried a shiver everywhere From the unleafed boughs and pastures bare; The little brook heard it and built a roof 'Neath which he could house him, winter-proof; All night by the white stars...
Page 35 - Which crystalled the beams of moon and sun, And made a star of every one: No mortal builder's most rare device Could match this winter-palace of ice...
Page 117 - THE stormy March is come at last, With wind, and cloud, and changing skies; I hear the rushing of the blast, That through the snowy valley flies. Ah, passing few are they who speak, Wild stormy month! in praise of thee ; Yet, though thy winds are loud and bleak, Thou art a welcome month to me. For thou, to northern lands, again The glad and glorious sun dost bring, And thou hast joined the gentle train And wear'st the gentle name of Spring.
Page 44 - WHEN I was sick and lay a-bed, I had two pillows at my head, And all my toys beside me lay To keep me happy all the day. And sometimes for an hour or so I watched my leaden soldiers go, With different uniforms and drills, Among the bed-clothes, through the hills; And sometimes sent my ships in fleets AH up and down among the sheets; Or brought my trees and houses out, And planted cities all about.
Page 248 - SUMMER is coming, summer is coming. I know it, I know it, I know it. Light again, leaf again, life again, love again,' Yes, my wild little Poet. Sing the new year in under the blue. Last year you sang it as gladly. ' New, new, new, new ! ' Is it then so new That you should carol so madly? ' Love again, song again, nest again, young again,' Never a prophet so crazy ! And hardly a daisy as yet, little friend, See, there is hardly a daisy.
Page 441 - shall I do with this little sixpence? I will go to market and buy a little Pig.

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