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twelve dollars and sixteen cents; Eugene R. Billett, eight dollars and eighty-three cents; Frank A. Kroeff, eighteen dollars and thirty-three cents; Albert Boehm, seven dollars and eighty-three cents; Frank H. Kempt, twentytwo dollars and sixteen cents; Herman F. Discher, six dollars and sixty-six cents; Joseph J. Nussbaumer, twenty-two dollars and sixteen cents; Henry Ebeling, junior, three dollars and fifty cents; Herman Nagel, twenty-two dollars and eighty-three cents; Ferdinand Wetzel, forty dollars and fifty cents; Charles Neumann, eleven dollars and sixteen cents; George Johnson, twentyfive dollars; Ambrosius Jachinski, twenty-two dollars and sixteen cents; Oscar Hensel, seven dollars and eight cents; William J. Trier, deceased, thirty-six dollars and fifty cents; Adolph G. Markworth, thirteen dollars and sixteen cents; total, four hundred and sixteen dollars and forty-two cents.

and Son.

M. A. Gantt To M. A. Gantt and Son, of Conecuh County, Ala

bama, the sum of one hundred dollars and fifty cents, for board and lodging furnished by them to volunteer soldiers who enlisted in the Second Regiment Alabama Volunter Infantry during the Spanish-American war.

damages

Virginia... For the allowance of claims of certain citizens of VirClaims of citizens of," for ginia for damages to their property incident to the en

y.campment at Manassas and march from Camp Alger volunteers, war with Spain. to Thoroughfare Gap, Virginia, as recommended by a

board of officers appointed for the consideration of claims for damages to property by volunteer soldiers during the war with Spain.

MISCELLANEOUS CASES.

FOR DIRECT APPROPRIATION.

Butt.

* . * Archibald w. To Captain Archibald W. Butt, quartermaster, United

States Army, the sum of four hundred and eighty dollars, amounts stolen from the United States in Manila, Philippine Islands, by an employee of the quartermaster's department, by name José B. Luciano, the said Captain Archibald W. Butt having fully paid said sum to the United States

Deitrick.

Leonard L. To Leonard L. Deitrick, late first lieutenant, Thirty

fourth Infantry, United States Volunteers, the sum of one hundred and twenty dollars, said sum having been United States funds stolen from his safe at Penaranda, Nueva Ecija, Philippine Islands, at some time between December third, nineteen hundred, and December twentyfourth, nineteen hundred, while he was acting commissary officer; and which sum the said Leonard L. Deitrick accounted for and paid to the proper officer of the United States from his own private funds.

CHAP. 1447.–An Act To extend the time within which actions Mar. 3. _1905.

[H. R. 17102.) for the recovery of duties paid in Porto Rico may be brought in '' the Court of Claims under the Act of April twenty-ninth, nine- [Public, No. teen hundred and two.

180.] 3 Stats. L.,

pt. 1, p. 1013. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the time within which actions may be brought in Porto Rican

duties. the Court of Claims for the recovery of customs duties“ Time ex. paid to the military authorities in the island of Porto Rico tended to file upon articles imported from the several States and en-funding. tered at the several ports of entry in Porto Rico from and including April eleventh, eighteen hundred and ninetynine, to May first, nineteen hundred, under the Act of April twenty-ninth, nineteen hundred and two, chapter six hundred and forty of the laws of the Fifty-seventh Congress, first session, be, and it is hereby, extended until six months from the date of the passage of this Act.

3449—07— 8

CUBA.

FIFTY-EIGHTH CONGRESS, SECOND SESSION.

CHAP. 1.–An Act to carry into effect a convention between Dec. 17, 1903. the United States and the Republic of Cuba, signed on the eleventh [H. R. 1921.] day of December, in the year nineteen hundred and two.

[Public, No. 1.]

33 Stats. L., Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representu- pt. 1, p. 3. tives of the United States of America in Congress assem- ..

Preferential bled, That whenever the President of the United States duties on imshall receive satisfactory evidence that the Republic of ports from. Cuba has made provision to give full effect to the articles of the convention between the United States and the Republic of Cuba, signed on the eleventh day of December, in the year nineteen hundred and two, he is hereby authorized to issue his proclamation declaring that he has received such evidence, and thereupon on the tenth day after exchange of ratifications of such convention between the United States and the Republic of Cuba, and so long as the said convention shall remain in force, all articles of merchandise being the product of the soil or industry of the Republic of Cuba, which are now imported into the United States free of duty, shall continue to be so admitted free of duty, and all other articles of merchandise being the product of the soil or industry of the Republic of Cuba imported into the United States shall be admitted at a reduction of twenty per centum of the rates of duty thereon, as provided by the tariff Act of the United States, approved July twenty-fourth, eighteen hundred and ninety-seven, or as may be provided by any tariff law of the United States subsequently enacted. The rates of duty herein granted by the United Duration. States to the Republic of Cuba are and shall continue during the term of said convention preferential in respect to all like imports from other countries: Provided, That Provisos. while said convention is in force no sugar imported from sugar duties. the Republic of Cuba, and being the product of the soil or industry of the Republic of Cuba, shall be admitted into the United States at a reduction of duty greater than twenty per centum of the rates of duty thereon, as provided by the tariff Act of the United States, approved July twenty-fourth, eighteen hundred and ninety-seven, and no sugar the product of any other foreign country shall be admitted by treaty or convention into the United

Limitation of as to origin of

lation,

customs fees

from Cuba.

States while this convention is in force at a lower rate of duty than that provided by the tariff Act of the United

States approved July twenty-fourth, eighteen hundred Declaration and ninety-seven: And provided further, That nothing customs legis- herein contained shall be held or construed as an admis

sion on the part of the House of Representatives that customs duties can be changed otherwise than by an Act of

Congress, originating in said House. No additional SEC. 2. That so long as said convention shall remain in on Ymports force, the laws and regulations adopted, or that may be

adopted by the United States to protect the revenues and prevent fraud in the declarations and proofs, that the articles of merchandise to which said convention may apply are the product or manufacture of the Republic of Cuba, shall not impose any additional charge or fees therefor on the articles imported, excepting the consular fees established, or which may be established, by the United States for issuing shipping documents, which fees shall not be higher than those charged on the ship

ments of similar mechandise from any other nation whatEqual treat-soever; that articles of the Republic of Cuba shall receive, ports by both on their importation into the ports of the United States,

treatment equal to that which similar articles of the

United States shall receive on their importation into the No discrimi- ports of the Republic of Cuba; that any tax or charge nation on place il of shipment. that may be imposed by the national or local authorities

of the United States upon the articles of merchandise of the Republic of Cuba, embraced in the provisions of said convention, subsequent to importation and prior to their entering into consumption into the United States, shall be imposed and collected without discrimination upon like articles whencesoever imported.

ment of im

countries.

Feb. 18, 1904. CHAP. 160.–An Act Making appropriations to supply urgent [H. R. 10954.] deficiencies in the appropriations for the fiscal year ending June [Public, No. thirtieth, nineteen hundred and four, and for prior years, and for

22.1 33 Stats. L., pt. 1, p. 15. (Naval station at Guantanamo, Cuba. See p. 48.)

(Expenses taking testimony in Cuba in regard to claims pending before Spanish Treaty Claims Commission. See p. 75.)

Mar. 12, 1904. CHAP. 543.-An Act Making appropriations for the diplomatic [H. R. 11287.] and consular service for the fiscal year ending June thirtieth, [Public, No. nineteen hundred and five.

48.1 33 Stats, L., Be it enacted by the Senate and Ilouse of Representapt. 1, p. 67.

tives of the United States of America in Congress assemDiplomaticbled, That the following sums be, and they are hereby, and consular appropriations. Severally appropriated, in full compensation for the dip

lomatic and consular service for the fiscal year ending

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