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Cuba. TEE Convention to frame and adopt & Constitution for Cuba, delegates to which were elected by the people of the island in September, 1900, met at Havana, November 5, 1900, and continued in session until late in 1901,

THE CONSTITUTION. The text of the proposed Constitution was submitted by the central committee of the convention, January 22, 1901. "It consisted of 25 sections and provided for a republican form of government, requirements for citizenship and duries of citizens, constitutional rights, rights of foreigners, the legislative power (Senate and House of Representatives, conjointly known as Congress), the executive power (a President and a Vice-President, each to serve four years), the judicial power, the revolutionary indebtedness, and amendments to the Constitution.

DECLARATION OF RELATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES. On February 27, 1901, the convention adopted a series of five declarations defining the relations of Cuba with the United States. These were as follows:

First-The Government of Cuba will not make a treaty or agreement with any foreign power which may compromise or limit the independence of Cuba, or which may permit or authorize any power to obtain by means of colonization or for military or naval purposes, or in any other manner, any foothold or authority or right over any portion of Cuba.

Second- The Government will not permit its territory to be used as a base of operations for war against the United States or against any foreign nation,

Third The Government of Cuba accepts in its entirety the Treaty of Paris, in which are affirmed the rights of Cuba to the extent of the obligations which are explicitly indicated, and especially those which the international law imposes for the protection of life and property, substituting itself for the United States in the pledge, which they assumed in that sense according to Articles 12 and 162 of the Treaty of Paris.

Fourth-Cuba recognizes as legally valid all acts of the Military Government during the period of occupation, also the rights arising out of them in conformity with the joint resolution and the Foraker amendment and the existing laws of the country.

Fifth_The Governments of the United States and Cuba ought to regulate their commercial relations by means of a treaty bised on reciprocity, and with tendencies toward free trade in natural and manufactured products, mutually assuring ample special advantages in their respective markets.

THE PLATT AMENDMENT. The above declarations were not acceptable to the United States, and Congress, on March 2, adopted an amendment to the Army Appropriation bill, offered by Senator Platt, of Connecticut, reciting that, "in fulfilment of the declaration contained in the joint resolution, approved April 20, 1898, entitled 'For the recognition of the independence of the people of Cuba, demanding that the Government of Spain relinquish its authority and government in the Island of Cuba, and to withdraw its land aud naval forces from Cuba and Cuban waters, and directing the President of the United States to use the land and naval forces of the United States to carry these resolutions into eftect,' the President is hereby authorized 'to leave the government and control of the Island of Cuba to its people,' so soon as a government shall have been established in said island under a Constitution which, either as a part thereof, or in an ordinance appended thereto, shall define the future relations of the United States with Cuba, substantially as follows:

First-That the Government of Cuba shall never enter into any treaty or other compact with any foreign power or powers which will impair or tend to impair the independence of Cuba, nor in any manner authorize or permit any power or powers to obtain by colonization or for military or naval purposes or otherwise lodgment in or control over any portion of said island.

Second_That said Government shall not assume or contract any public debt, to pay the interest upon which and to make reasonable sinking fand provision for the ultimate discharge of which the ordinary revenues of the island, after defraying the current expenses of government, shall be inadequate.

Third-That the Government of Cuba consents that the United States may exercise the right to intervene for the preservation of Cuban independence, the maintenance of a government adequate for the protection of life, property, and individual liberty, and for discharging the obligations with respect to Cuba imposed by the Treaty of Paris on the United States, now to be assumed and undertaken by the Government of Cuba.

Fourth--That all acts of the United States in Cuba during its military occupation thereof are ratified and validated, and all lawful rights acquired thereunder shall be maintained and protected.

Fifth-That the Government of Cuba will execute, and, so far as necessary, extend the plans already devised, or other plans to be mutually agreed upon, for the sanitation of the cities of the island, to the end that a recurrence of epidemic and infectious diseases may be prevented, thereby assuring protection to the people and commerce of Cuba, as well as to the commerce of the southern ports of the United States and the people residing therein.

Sixth-That the Isle of Pines shall be omitted from the proposed constitutional boundaries of Cuba, the title thereto left to future adjustment by treaty.

Seventh-That to enable the United States to maintain the independence of Cuba and to protect the people thereof, as well as for its own defence, the Government of Cuba will sell or lease to the United States lands necessary for cualıng or naval state tions at certain specified points, to be agreed upon with the President of the United States.

Eighth-That by way of further assurance, the Government of Cuba will embody the foregoing provisions in a permanent treaty with the United States.

On May 28 the Cuban Constitutional Convention voted, 15 to 14, to accept the Platt amendment in a revised and modified form, to be attached as an appendix to the Cuban Constitution. These modifications purported to give the meaning of the amendment as "explained" by Secretary Root to the members of a special commission of convention delegates which visited Washington in April and conferred with the Secretary of War there.

On May 31, at a Cabinet meeting in Washington, it was decided that the action of the convention was not a substantial'' compliance with the terms of the amendment, and the convention was informed that the United States insisted on the adoption of the amendment without qualification.

On June 12 the convention accepted the Platt amendment by a vote of 16 to 11, four members being absent. The following is a record of the vote: In favor of acceptance, Señors Capote, Villuendas, José M. Gomez, Tamayo, Monteaguedo, Delgado, Betancourt, Giberga, Llorente, Quesada, Sanguily, Nunez, Rodriguez, Berriel, Quilez, Ferrer; opposed to acceptance, Señors Zayas, Aleman, Eudaldo Tamayo, Juan G. Gomez, Cisneros, Silva, Fortun, Lacret, Portuondo, Castro, Manduley.

THE ELECTORAL LAW. The convention then proceeded to.draw up an electoral law. It provided for general elections to be held December 31, 1901, presidential and senatorial "electors,” representatives in the lower house of Congress, and provincial governors and councillors to be chosen by the direct vote of the people, and the President, Vice-President, and Senators to be chosen by the electors'' on February 24, 1902.

When a full report of these elections are made by the election officers to the United States Governor-General, he will then announce the day for the assembling of the Congress, the inauguration of the President and Vice-President, and the transfer of actual authority from the United States to the new Cuban Government..

The Governor-General of Cuba during the year 1901 was Major-General Leonard Wood. U.S.A.

The American Indian.

THE annual reports of the agents of the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs in 1900 showed that the Indian population was 270,541, distributed in the several States as follows: Arizona 40,189, Kansas..... 1,211 New York ........ 5,334, Utah

2,115 California 11,431 Michigan 65 North Carolina.. 1,436 Washington

9,827 Colorado

995|Minnesota 8,952 North Dakota ... 8.276 Wisconsin ......... 10,726 Florida ...... 575 Montana 10,076 Oklahoma 13,926 Wyoniing ........

1,642 Idaho 3,557|Nebraska 3,854||Oregon

4,063 Miscellaneous..... 849 Indian Ter...... 86, 265|Nevada

8.321 South Dakota..... 19, 212 Iowa..... 385 New Mexico... 9.480 Texas

290 Total

270,544

INDIAN POPULATION IN DETAIL IN 1890. The total Indian population of the United States, exclusive of Alaska, but including, 32,567 counted in the general census, being the taxed or taxable indians, numbered in 1890 249, 273, The following table gives the division of the Indians in detail at the time of that census. The expenditures of the United States on account of the Indians in the fiscal year ended June 30, 1901, was $10,887,449. The expenditures from 1789 to 1901 inclusive have been $379, 232,776. Indians on reservations or at school, under control of the Indian office (not taxed or taxable).. 133,382 Indians incidentally under the Indian office, and self-supporting:

The five civilized tribes, Indians and colored-Cherokees, 29,599; Chickasaws, 7,182; Choctaws, 14,397; Creeks, 14,632; Seminoles, 2,561; total, 68,371. Total Indians, 52,065; total colored Indian citizens and claimants, 14,224; grand total.......

66, 289 Pueblos of New Mexico ...

8,278 Six Nations, Saint Regis, and other Indians of New York.

5,304 Lastern Cherokees of North Carolina ...

2,885 Indians taxed or taxable, and self-sustaining citizens, counted in the general census (98 per cent not on reservations)......

32,567 Indians under control of the War Dep't, prisoners of war (A paches at Mt. Vernon Barracks)..... 384 Indians in State or Territorial prisons.

184 Total

249, 273

Progress of the United States in Xts Material Industries.

(Prepared by the Bureau of Statistics, Treasury Department.)

+240 +261

+770

-62

Per Cent

Increase or 1870. 1880. 1890. 1895.

1900.

Decrease 1870-1900.

(+ or -) Population.... 38.558,371 50,155,783 62,629,250 69,878,000 76,303,387

+98 Salaries paid in public schools..

$37,832,556 $55,94:,972 $91,836,484 $113,872,38 *$128,662,880 Newspapers and periodicals published.

5,871
11.314
16,930
19,530

*21,178 Post-offices in existence.

28,492
42.989
62,401
70,064

76,688

+169 Receipts of Post-Office Department. $19,772,221 $33,315,479 $60,882,097 $76,983,128 $102,354,579

+418 Telegraph messages sent..

9,157,646 29,215,509 63,358,762 70,801,207 79,696,227 Railways in operation, miles.

52,922
93,262
166.73
181,115

*190,833

+ 261 Tons of freight carried one mile. (+) | 139,302,209,249 79,192,985,125 88,567,770,801 *126,991,703,110

+223 Average freight rate per ton mile.

$1.94
$1.17
$0.93
$0.94

*$0.73
Tonpage of vessels passing through the
Sault Ste. Marie Canal

690,826 1,734,890 8,454,495 16,806,781 22,316,834 +3,130 Wheat produced, bushels. 235,884,700 498,549,868 399,262,000 467,102,947 522,229,505

+ 121 Corn produced, bushels.

1,094,255,000 1,717,434,593 1,489,970,000 2,151,138,580 2,103,102,516 +92 Cotton produced, pounds,

1,451,401.357 2,771,797,156 3,627,366,183 5,036,964,409 4,757,062,942 +2:8 Cotton domestic) taken by mills, bales. 857,000 1,795,000 2,325,000 2,871,000 3,644,000

+325 Coal produced, tons 32,863,000 63,822,830 140,866,931 172,426,366 *238,877,182

7.626 Petroleum, gallons..

185,262,672 836,394,132 1,466,867,546 2,072,469,672 2,396,975,700 +1,198 Pig iron produced, tong. 1,665,179 3,835,191 9,202.703 9,446,308 13,789,242

+7:8 Steel produced, tons.

68,750 1,247,335 4,277,071 6,114,834 10,639,857 +15,376 Imports of manufactures of iron and steel...

$32,665,454 $71,266,699 $41,679,501 $23,048,5151 $20,478,728 Exports of manufactures of iron and

$11,002,902 $14,716,594 $25,542,208 $32,009,989 $121,913,548 +1,008 Imports of raw silk for manufacturing, pounds.

583,589 2,562,236 7,347,909 8,995,839 13,043,714 +2,135 Imports of crude rubber for mannfacturing, pounds... 9,624,098 16,826,099 33,842,374 39,741,607 49,377,138

+413 Exports of manufactures $68,279,764 $102,856,015 $151,102,376 $183,595,743 $433,854,756

+535 Exports of agricultural products. $361,188.483 $675,961,091 $629,20,808 $553,210,026 $ 35,858,123

+ 133 Total exports. $392,771,768 $ 35,638,658 $57, 28,684 $07,538,165 $1,394,483,082

+ 256 Total imports

$435,958,408 $667,954,746 $789,310.409 $731,969,965 $849,941,184 Total money in circulation...

$675,212,794 $973,382,228 $1,429,251,270 $1,601,968,473 $2,455,150 998 Per capita money in circulation... $17.50

$26.94 Deposits in savings banks.

$549,874,359 $819,106,973 $1,524,844,506 $1,810,597,023 $2,449,547,885 Number of depositors in savings banks. 1,630,846 2,335,582 4,25%,893 4,875,519

6,107.083 American vessels, domestic trade, tons. 2,729,707 2,715,224 3,477.802 3,797,773

4,338,145 American vessels, foreign trade, tons.. 1,516,800 1,352,810 946,695

838,187

826,694 American vessels, Great Lakes only, tons..... 684,704 605,102 1,063,0631 1,241,459] 1,565,587)

+129 * Preliminary data.

+ No data.

11882,

steel ...

+95 +204

+54 + 345 +274 +59 -46

Life Xusurance Statistics. CONDITION OF RECULAR LEVEL PREMIUM COMPANIES JANUARY 1, 1901,

AND BUSINESS THE PRECEDING YEAR.*

Payments to
No.
Premiums Total

Policyholders

Total Ex

NEW POLICIES ISSUED. POLICIES IN FORCE. OF Assets. Received. Income.

(Losses, Div. Cos.

idends, Sur

penditures.
renders, etc.)

No.
Amount.

No. Amount. 76 $1,742,414,173 $324, 723,954) $400,613,2571 $108,687,601) 267,580,1001 4,670,948 $1,973,611,066 14,395,443 $8,562,139,740

CONDITION AND BUSINESS OF ASSESSMENT COMPANIES AND ORDERS. No.

MEMBERSHIP

INSURANCE IN Force. OF Assets. Assessments Total Payments to Total Ex

Admitted During

No. of
Cos.
Collected. Income. Policyholders penditures.

Amount. the Year.

Members. 124 $36,244,393) $57,734,169 $60,057,168) $$41,061,444 #47,562,575 643,205 2,725,221 $4,274,322,132

Including industrial policies. These figures are from the Illinois Life Insurance Report for 1901, and represent the combined business of the assessment companies and fraternal orders. The assessment business having declined since 1896, these aggregates are nearly half those of that year.

The returns of life insurance in the first and third tables are from "The Insurance Year-Book," published by The Spectator Company.

INCOME AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR TWENTY YEARS. The following table shows the receipts and disbursements of the "old-line' life insurance companies reporting to the New York Insurance Department for twenty years:

Total Pay. Total Payments
YEAR No. of

ments for
for Lapsed,

Total
Total Taxes, Com-

Total DisENDING Com Total Income. Losses, Endow

Surrendered, and
Dividends to Payments to missions, and

bursements. Dec. 31. panies.

ments, and

Purchased Policies. Policyholders. Policyholders. Other Expenses.

Annuities. 1881. 30 $79,820,513 $31,068,144 88,497,354 $12,579,151 $52,144,649 $13,089,414 $65,484,687 1882. 30 85,070,134 29,826,874 9,255,077 13,555,105 52.637,056 13,338,788 66,242,344 1883. 29 92,562,763 33,894,306 8,837,857 13,417,464 56,149,627 15,295,264 71,743,588 1884. 29 96,974,376 35,602,544 9,503,530 13,043,498 58,149,572 18,153,435 76,632,098 1885.

29 105,527,865 38,624,822 9,630,269 12,963,660 61,218,751 18,715,267 80,259,549 1886. 29 116,961,315 38,276,390 9,433,379 13,218,286 60,928,054 21,066,540 82,319,096 1887. 29 130,657,526 42,827,054 10,413,379 14,852,624 68,003,557 25,031, 101 93,447,289 1888. 30 147,024,431 48,569,964 11,234,569 14,324,827 74,129,360 27,905,878 103,369,145 1889. 30 168,184,699 53,081,834 12,240,142 13,951,069 79,273,667 34,898,168 114,503,360 1890. 30 187,424,959 58,606,615 13,827,225 14,271,501 86,707,341 39,616,782 126,653,530 1891. 29 201,931,425 62,731,497 16,230,891

13,991,226 92,953,614 42,350,372 135,792,048 1892.

31 223,024,998 72,576,866 15,658,759 14,386,195 102,621,820 49,665,730 152,890,333 1893. 32 236,683,206 75,903,820 19,839,418 14 823,176 110,566,414 55,205,336 166,512,254 1894.

33 256,624,478 78,313,162 23,164,108 14,577,455 116,054,725 61,073,545 177,863,333 1895 35 266,897,200 84,791,622 22,889,493 15,297,604 122,978,718 62,052,872 185,772,902 1896.

36 279,373,107 90,146,264 26,368,039 17,083,169 134,219,515 64,160,732 199,173,299 1897. 35 301,268,179 92,688,307 26,431,312 18,425,197 137,544,815 67,582,025 205,866,394 1898. 35 320,306,169 98,465,681 26,436,307 19,694,634 144,566.622 72,667 590 218,063,363 1899. 37 355,946,005 111,788,691 23,080,965 20,917,143 155,786,799 86,622,697 243, 104,558 1900.. 40 392,358,741 120,945,587) 22,190,804 22,568,261 165,704,652 94,782,023 261,467,238 ASSETS OF AND AMOUNT INSURED BY THE PRINCIPAL AMERICAN COM

PANIES JANUARY 1, 1901.
Insurance
Gross

Insurance Gross
COMPANIES.
in Force. Assets.

COMPANIES.

in Force. Assets. New York Life, N. Y. $1,202,156,665 $262,196,512 Provident Life & Trust, Pa.. $134,201,324 $43, 09,633 Mutual, N. Y.

1,139,940,529 325,819,283 New England Mutual... 120,510,716 30,972,033 Equitable, N. Y 1,116,875,047 304,073,880 Travelers', Ct.

104,019,851 24,943,647 Metropolitan, N. Y...

923,892,206 62,158,084 Provident Say. Life, N. Y.. 102,886,128 3,891,456 Prudential, N. J. 604,258,025 4.599,992 National, Vt...

99,471,839 19.900,890 Northwestern Mut., Wis. 529,647 290 130.558,966 Fidelity Mutual, Pa.

82,119,185 3,379,337 Mutual Benefit, N. J. 275,328,826 74,315,090 Germania, N. Y.

81,434,409 27,378,533 Jno. Hancock Mut., Mass.

221,032,536 16,874,840 State Mutual Life, Mass. 80,889,097 17,793,629 Mut. Reserve Fund, N. Y.+ 189,267,374 2,910,095 Phenix Mutual, Ct..

63,802,139 13,283,008 Penn Mutual, Pa....

210,400,746 43,743,808 Washington Life, N.Y. 61,083,689 16.144,433 Etna, (t...

192,592,816 56,095,907 Manhattan Life, N. Y.. 60,261,151 16,169,8:23 Connecticut Mutual, Ct... 161,566,603 64,465,176 Home, N. Y...

54,069,852 12,342,247 Union Central, Ohio 148,820,737 26,241,270 Berkshire Life, Mass..

54,000,676 10,238,378 Bankers' Life,' Iowat. 143,256,000 3,470,369 Union Mutual, Me

50,191,852 8,447,449 Massachusetts Mutual

136,238,923 26,245,622

LIFE INSURANCE IN VARIOUS COUNTRIES.I
Insurance in Year's
Year's
Insurance in Year's

Year's COUNTRIES.

COUNTRIES.
Force. Premiums, Losses.

Force. Premiums.

Losses. United States. $12,836,461,872 $382,458,123 $164,239,372 Austria

$370,621,530 $14,613,420 $4,098,025 Great Britain. 3,866,000.750 144,538,725 107.405,100 Scandinavia

128,213,755 4,365,360 1,147,995 Germany 1,320,163,685 50,313,925 16,767,830 Switzerland

70,390,250 3,025,100 1,170,225 France... *695,231,5501 40,051,080! 10,647,0601Russia ...

47,925,979 1,757,681 584,707 *Includes industrial business. + Assessment companies. From most recent reports. Including assessment business ($4,274,322,132 insurance in force), on which no part of the future premium is collected in advance.

Fire Insurance Statistics.
CONDITION AND TRANSACTIONS OF COMPANIES DOING BUSINESS IN THE

UNITED STATES JANUARY 1, 1901.
Assets Exclusive of

Cash Premiums Re-
NUMBER OF COMPANIES. Capital.

Net Surplus.

Total Cash Income Premium Notes.

ceived during Year. during Year. 321 Stock. 189 Mutual.....

:}| $73,150,875 $413,027,067 $162,567,699 $182,130, 774 $198,312,577 Paid for Losses Paid for Dividends

Expenses other than Total DisburseNUMBER OF COMPANIES.

Losses and Divi ments during

Risks Written during Year. during Year. dends during Year. Year.

during Year. 321 Stock 189 Mutual......

$108,357,171 $16,029, 429 $65,860,981 $191, 247,681 * $20,000,000,000 Approximation. These statistics of fire insurance business in the United States are, with the exception of the estimate of risks written during the year, compiled from "The Insurance YearBook," published by The Spectator Company. They do not include the returns of a few stock companies and some 600 mutuals and town and county mutuals, whose transactions are purely local and individually of small volume. CONDITION OF THE PRINCIPAL JOINT-STOCK COMPANIES DOING BUSI

NESS IN THE UNITED STATES JANUARY 1, 1901.*
Gross
Net

Gross

Net
COMPANIES.

Capital
Assets.

Surplus.
COMPANIES.

Assets.
Capital.

Surplus. Home, New York. $13,637,834 $3,000,000 $5,297,499 London & Lancashire. $2,641,046 + $200,000 $740,910 Ætna, Ct.

13,357,294 4,000,000 5,302,598 Firemen's, N. J. 2,633,611 1,000,000 1,147,128 Hartford, Ct..

11,119,255 1,250,000 3,522, 760 St. Paul F.& M., Minn. 2,606,392 500,000 693,810 Continental, New York. 10,638,271 1,000,000 4,510,539 Sun, England.

2 595,075 † 200,000 780,521 Liverp., London & Globe 9,804,903 + 200,000 4,504,728 Mil. Mechanics', Wis.. 2,519,914 200,000 1,355, 352 Ins. Co. of N. America. 9,409,846 3,000,000 1,566,853 American Fire,'Pa. 2,477,069 500,000 247,360 German-American, N. Y 8,676,281 1,000,000 4,267,712 Traders', Ill.

2,432,197 500,000 1,006,973 Royal, England..

7,187 716 t 200,000 2,284,044 Norwich Union, Eng.. 2,396,657 +200,000 733,018 Fire Association, Pa. 6,295,759 500,000 865,520 Orient, Ct...

2,379,038 500,000 664,041 Phenix, New York 5,994,705 1,000,000 1,533,780 Agricultural, N. Y... 2,283,558 500,000 543,541 Phenix, Ct ..

5,640,164 2,000,000 1,226,253 Providence-Wash.,R.I 2,169,547 500,000 471,239 Pennsylvania.

5,334,222 400,000 2,159,184 WilliamsburghC., N.Y 2,066,300 250,000 1.120,895 Springfield F. & M. 5,159,623 1,500,000 1,818,241 Buffalo-German, N.Y. 2,028,732 200,000 1,447,374 National, Ct... 4,992,693 1,000,000 1,530,035 Girard F. & M., Pa.... 2,021,101 300,000

615,425 Germania, N. Y.

4,963,800 1,000,000 2.275,975 American Central, Mo. 2,019,567 600,000 625,892 Queen, New York.

4,751,382 500,000 2,349,204 Western, Canada 2,016,371 † 200,000 438,431 N. British & Mercantile. 4,348,615 † 200,000 1,708,454 Caledonian, Scotland. 1,910,618 † 200,000 609,235 Scottish Union & Nat'l.. 4,312,984 | 200,000 2,024,055 Imperial, England... 1,894,358 + 200,000 606,972 Connecticut Fire...

4,168,195 1,000,000 1,070,376 Greenwich, N. Y. 1,890,327 200,000 200,517 Commercial Union, Eng. 3,851,077 + 200,000 1,202,760 Manchester, England 1,841,099 +200,000 351,693 American, N. J....

3,673,4831 600,000 1,599,792 London Assurance..... 1,702,819 + 200,000 638,699 German, Freeport, Ill.. 3,475,405 200,000 1,035,722 Union, England. 1,643,663 | 200,000 524,310 Glens Falls, N. Y

3,436,899 200,000 2,227,190 Hamburg, Bremen.. 1,586,976 1 200,000 299,581 Boston, Mass.. 3,420,069 1,000,000 1,548,227 Delaware, Pa.

1.563,451 702,875 98,030 New Hampshire Fire.. 3,414,920 1,000,000 1,003,255 United Firemen's,

Pa. 1,538,463 300,000 193,145 Fireman's Fund, Cal.. 3,412,176 1,000,000 613,514 Royal Exchange, Eng. 1,526,588 + 200,000 605,427 Hanover Fire, N. Y. 3,159,779 1,000,000 485,663 Firemen's, Md.

1,497,709 900,000

182,619 Franklin Fire, Pa..

3,083,799 400,000 1,094,286 American Fire, N. Y 1,478,229 400,000 312,209 Westchester, N. Y

3,005,015 300,000 1,219,258 Eagle Fire, New York 1,422,891 300,000 782,832 Northwestern Nat'l, Wis 2,955,139 600,000 1,000,631Merchants', N. J..... 1 388,706 400,000 182,005 Phenix, England.

2,332,623 200,000 592,615 Spring Garden, Pa. 1,357,992 400,000 103,499 Niagara Fire, N. Y.

2,899,390

500,000 811,835 Detroit F. & M., Mich. 1,355,839 500,000 645,521 Northern,

England. 2,766,023! + 200,000l 1,325,845||British-America, Can./ 1,310,063 + 200,000l 257,879 Annual statements of the fire insurance companies are rendered to the insurance departments during the month of January; therefore the statistics of condition in 1902 were not ready when this publication went to press.

+ The New York law requires a deposit of $200,000 from foreign companies with the insurance department. This is treated by the department as "deposit capital,' and the surplus stated in the next column is surplus beyond deposit capital” and other liabilities. ANNUAL PROPERTY LOSSES IN THE UNITED STATES BY FIRES–1875-1901. YEARS. Aggregate Property Aggregate Insur

YEARS.

| Aggregate Property Aggregate InsurLoss. ance Loss.

Loss.

ance Loss. 1875.

1889. $78,102,285 $39,325,400

$123,046,833 $73,679,465 1876.. 64,630,600 34,374,500

1890.

108,993,792 65,015,465 1877

1891. 68,265,800 37,398,900

143,764,967 90,576,918

1892. 1878. 64,315,900 36,575,900

151,516,098 93,511,936 1879. 77,703,700 44,464,700

1893.

167,544,370 105,994,577 1880.

74,643,400

42,525,000
1894.

140,006,484 89,574,699 1881.

81,280,900

44,641,900
1895.

142, 110,233 84,689,030

1896. 1882. 84,505,024 48,875,131

118,737,420

73,903,800 1883.

100,149,228

54,808,664
1897.

116,354 570 66,722,140 1884.

1898. 110,008,611 60,679,818

130,593 905 73,796,080 1885.

1899. 102,818,796 57,430,789

153,597,830 92,683,715

1900. 104,924,750 1886.

60,506,567

160,929,805 95,403,650 120,283,055 1887

69,659,508
190l..

*148,000,000 *86,000,000 1888. 110,885,665 63,965,724

Total 27 years... $3,047,714,021 $1,786,785,893 • Estimated. The figures in the last table, from 1875 to 1900, inclusive, are taken from the Chronicle Fire Tables.

The United States Census. THE Twelfth Census of the United States was taken under the act of Congress approved March 3, 1899.

The statistics gathered are now in course of preparation for publication by the Census Office at Washington. Partial reports upon population, manufactures, agriculture, and mortality have already been made public, and summaries of thelr contents will be found on other pages of THE WORLD ALMANAC.

The subjects covered by the Twelfth Census are not as numerous as those undertaken by the Eleventh Census. The census proper is limited to four general subjects, namely, population, agriculture, mortality, and manufactures. The act provided that the reports of these subjects shall be designated as and constitute the Census Reports,'' and requires that such reports shall be published not later than the 1st of July, 1902. A number of subjects of investigation in the Tentb and Eleventh Censuses are omitted, but only those upon which statistics are collected and published by other branches of the Government, such as railroad transportation, information in regard to fisheries, water power, etc

After the work on the four general subjects above referred to is completed the Director of the Census was authorized to collect statistics relating to special classes, including the insane, feebleminded, deaf, dumb, and blind; to crime, pauperism, and benevolence including prisoners, paupers, juvenile delinquents, and inmates of benevolent and reformatory institutions; to deaths and births in registration areas; to social statistics of cities; to public indebtedness, valuation, taxation, and expenditures; to religious bodies; to electric light and power, telephone, and telegraph business; to transportation by water, express business, and street railways; to mines, mining, and minerals. The reports relating to mines, mining, and minerals must be published on or before July 1, 1903. The reports on these subjects shall be designated as *Special Reports of the Census Office."

On all subjects of inquiry the subjects are simplified as much as possible, and much matter which has heretofore been included, but which never reached any practical statistical results, has been dropped, and the work concentrated upon lines which will produce statistics of recognized value.

The following general officers superintend the taking of the census: William R. Merriam, of St. Paul, Minn., Director; Dr. F. H. Wines, of Illinois, Assistant Director; W. C. Hunt, of the District of Columbia, Chief Statistician in charge of the Population Division; L G. Powell, of Minnesota, Chief Statistician in charge of the Agricultural Division; S. N. D. North, of Massachusetts, Chief Statistician in charge of Manufactures; W. A. King, of the District of Columbia, Chief Statistician in charge of Vital Statistics; Prof. W. A. Wilcox. of Cornell University, Chief Statistician in charge of Methods and Results; Edward McCauley, District of Columbia. Disbursing Clerk; A. F. Childs, District of Columbia, Chief Clerk, and Henry Gannett, District of Columbia, Geographer.

The United States and Canada. TEXT OF THE AGREEMENT FOR THE TEMPORARY SETTLEMENT OF THE ALASKA

BOUNDARY LINE. THE following is the text of the modus vivendi negotiated between the State Department of the United States and the British Foreign Office, the Anglo-American Joint High Commission to adjust all outstanding questions between the United States and the Dominion of Canada having been unable to reach a conclusion at the time of the adoption of this agreement, October 20, 1899:

It is hereby agreed between the Governments of the United States and of Great Britain that the boundary line between Canada and the Territory of Alaska, in the region about the head of Lynn Canal, shall be provisionally fixed without prejudice to the claims of either party in the permanent adjustment of the international boundary, as follows:

In the region of the Dalton Trail, a line beginning at the peak west of Porcupine Creek, marked on the Map No. 10 of the United States Commission, December 31, 1895, and on Sheet No. 18 of the British Commission, December 31, 1895, with the number 6,500; thence running to the Klehini (or Klaheela) River, in the direction of the peak north of the river, marked No. 5,020 on the aforesaid United States map and No. 5,025 on the aforesaid British map; thence following the high or right bank of the said Klehini River to the junction thereof with the Chilkat River, a mile and a half, more or less, north of Klukwan, provided that persons proceeding to or from Porcupine Creek shall be freely permitted to follow the trail between the said creek and the said junction of the rivers into and across the territory on the Canadian side of the temporary line wherever the trail crosses to such side, and subject to such reasonable regulations for the protection of the revenue as the Canadian Government may prescribe, to carry with them over such part or parts of the trail between the said points as may lie on the Canadian side of the temporary line such goods and articles as they desire, without being required to pay any customs duties on such goods and articles, and from said junction to the summit of the peak east of the Chilkat River, marked on the aforesaid Map No. 10 of the United States Commi on with the number 5,410, and on the Map No.17 of the aforesaid British Commission with the number 5,490.

On the Nyea and Skagwaytrails, the summits of the Chilkoot and White passes.

It is understood, as formerly set forth in communications of the Department of State of the United States, that the citizens or subjects of either power found by this arrangement within the temporary jurisdiction of the other shall suffer no diminution of the rights and privileges which they now enjoy!

The Government of the United States will at once appoint an officer or officers, in conjunction with the officer or officers to be named by the Government of Her Britannic Majesty, to mark the temporary line agreed upon by the erection of posts, stakes, or other appropriate temporary marks.

White House Rules.
THE Cabinet will meet Tuesdays and Fridays from 11 A. M. until 1 P, M.
Senators and Representatives will

be received from 10 A, M. to 12 m., excepting on Cabinet days. Visitors having business with the President will be admitted from 12 to 1 o'clock daily, excepting Cabinet days, so far as public business will permit.

The East Room will be open daily, Sundays excepted, for the inspection of visitors, between the hours of 10 A. M. and 2 P. M. By direction of the President. George B. Cortelyou, Secretary.

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