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The Submarine Cables of the world.

(From report issued by the International Bureau of Telegraph Administrations.) The following table sets forth the entire system of submarine cables of the world, including those along the shores and in the bays, gulfs, and estuaries of rivers, but excepting those in lakes and the interior watercourses of continents. The list includes all cables operated by private companies, and in addition thereto under the name of each nation is given the list of cables operated by the govern ent of that nation.

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Anglo-American Telegraph Co. Transatlantic System - Valentia

(Ireland) to Heart's Content

(Newfoundland). Minon, near Brest (France), to St.

Pierre-Miquelon.
Commercial Cable Co...
Transatlantic System-Waterville

(Ireland) to Canso (Nova Scotia).
Canso, N.S., to New York.
Canso, N. S., to Rockport, Mass.
Emden, Germany, via Azores, to

New York,
Direct United States Cable Co....
Ballinskellig's Bay (Ireland) to

Halifax (Nova Scotia). Halifax, N.S., to Rye Beach, N. H. Western Union Telegraph Co.... Transatlantic System-Sennen

Cove, near Penzance, England, to

Dover Bay, near Canso, N. S.
Dover Bay, N. S., to New York.

Gulf of Mexico System.
Compagnie Française des câbles Télé-
graphiques...
Brest (France) to Cape Cod, Mass.
Brest (France) to St. Pierre-Miq.
St. Pierre to Cape Cod, Mass.
Cape Cod, Mass., to New York,
African Direct Telegraph Co.......
Black Sea Telegraph Co............
Western Telegraph Co.
Carcavellos, near Lisbon (Portu-

gal), to Madeira, to St. Vincent (Cape Verde Island), to Pernambuco, Rio de Janeiro, Santos,

Montevideo. Central and South American Tele

graph Co............. Compagnie Allemande des câbles. Compania Telegrafico-Telefonica del

Plata......

9,554 Cuba Submarine Telegraph Co.

Direct Spanish Telegraph Co........
Direct West India Cable Co.
Bermuda - Turk's Island, and

Turk's Island-Jamaica. 11,663

Eastern and South African Telegraph

Co.....
Eastern Extension Australasia and

China Telegraph Co........
Eastern Telegraph Co.......
Anglo-Spanish - Portuguese Sys-

tem.
3,100 System West of Malta.

Italo-Greek System.
Austro-Greek System,
Greek System.

Turko-Greek System. 7,478

Turkish System.
Egypto-European System.
Egyptian System.
Egypto-Indian System.
Cape Town to St. Helena.
St. Helena to Ascension Island.

Ascension Island to St. Vincent. 12,102

Europe and Azores Telegraph Co....
Great Northern Telegraph Co..

Cables in Europe and Asia.

Halifax and Bermuda Cable Co... 2,943 Indo-European Telegraph Co..... 337 India Rubber, Gutta Percha, and Tel

egraph Works Co....... 17,260

Mexican Telegraph Co......
River Plate Telegraph Co......
South American Cable Co......
United States and Hayti Telegraph

and Cable Co...

West African Telegraph Co.. 7,500

West Coast of America Telegraph Co. 5,253 West India & Panama Telegraph Co..

32

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CABLES OWNED BY NATIONS.

187

Austria..
Belgium
Denmark
France.
Germany
Great Britain and Ireland.
Greece.
Holland.
Italy ........
Norway
Portugal.
Russia..
Spain..
Sweden......
Switzerland...
Turkey

44

2 86 63 69 173 46 32 39 536

1 40 32 1 1 8

2 1181

99 349 213

199 1,784

774 2,022

2

4 10 15 16

9 23

217 Egypt.

54 Argentine Republic and Brazil...
288 Australia and New Zealand.
5,054 Bahama Islands....
2,636 British America.
2,074 British India..

54 Cochin China and Tonquin.
241 Japan....
1,060 Macao.
543 Nouvelle Calédonie.
115 Netherlands Indies..

319 Senegal, Africa..
1,743 Siam
209 Nouvelle Galles du Sud..
9

Total....

1 1 7 1 3

1 891

3 13 31

1,880)

21,528

.....

Telegraph Rates

75 5

BETWEEN NEW YORK CITY AND PLACES IN UNITED STATES AND CANADA.

EXPLANATION: Day rate, 40-3, means 40 cents for ten words and 3 cents for each additional word; night rate, 30-2, means 30 cents for ten words and 2 cents for each additional word. Address and signature are free. Rates given are Western Union rates. RATE.

RATE.
PLACES.
Day. Night.

PLACES.

Day. Night. ALABAMA.

50-3

30-2 Stillwater, Wabasha, Winona.. 50-3 30-2 ALASKA:

All other places

60-4

40-3 Eagle City 6.50-41'6.25-40 MISSISSIPPI...

50-8 30-2 Skagway, Summit. 6. 00-36 5. 75-35 MISSOURI: St. Louis..

40-3 30-2 ARIZONA

1. 00-7 1.00-7 Hannibal,Jefferson City, KanARKANSAS: Helena, Hot Springs,

sas City, Louisiana, Sedalia, St. Little Rock, Pine Blutr. 50 3 30-2 Joseph.

50-3 30-2 All other places.

60-4
40-3
All other places.

60-4 40-3 BRITISH COLUMBIA: Fort Steele,

MONTANA..

75-5 60-4 Grand Forks, Greenwood, Na

NEBRASKA: Omaha.

50-3 30-2 naimo, Nelson, New Westmin

All other places..

60-4 40-3 ster, Rossland, Vancouver, Vic

NEVADA

1.00-7 1.00-7 toria.

1.00-7 1.00-7|NEW BRUNSWICK: St. Stephen. 35-2 25-1 Atlin.. 4. 25-23 4.00-22 All other places..

50-3 30-2 Bennett

5. 50-33 5. 25-32 NEWFOUNDLAND: St. John's.. 1 25-11 1.05-10 Port Simpson. 3.75-23 3.50-22 NEW HAMPSHIRE,

25-2 25-1 CALIFORNIA

1.00-7 1.00-7 NEW JERSEY: COLORADO

60-4 Bloomfield, Carlstadt, East CONNECTICUT

25-2 25-1 Orange, Elizabeth, Glen Ridge, DELAWARE.

25-2 25-1 Hoboken, Jersey City, MontDISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

25-2 25-1 clair, Mountain Station Newark, FLORIDA.

60-4 40-3 Orange, Orange Valley, Passaic, GEORGIA

50-3 30-2 Paterson, Rutherford, South IDAHO

1. 00-7 1. 00-7 Orange, Union Hill, Weehawken 20-1 20-1 ILLINOIS: Chicago, Union Stock

All other places...

25-2 25-1 Yards, National Stock Yards. 40-3 30-2 NEW MEXICO..

75-5 60-4 All other places ..

50-3 30-2 NEW York: Astoria, Brooklyn, INDIANA: Columbus, Fort Wayne,

Caryl, Flatbush, Fordham Indianapolis, Jeffersonville, La

Heights,Governor's Island, High Fayette, Logansport, New Al

Bridge, Hunter's Point, Kingsbany, Richmond, Union City.. 40-3 30-2 bridge, Long Island City, Morris All'other places

50-3 30-2 Heights, New York City, RaINDIAN TERRITORY.

75-5 60-4 venswood, Riverdale, Spuyten IOWA: Burlington, Cedar Rapids,

Duyvil, Van Cortlandt,' WillClinton, Council Bluffs, Daven

iamsbridge, Woodlawn, Yonkers 20-1 201 port, Des Moines, Dubuque, Fort

All other places..

25-2 25-1 Madison, Grinnell, Iowa City,

NORTH CAROLINA

50-3 30-2 Keokuk, Muscatine, Newton,

NORTH DAKOTA...

75-5

60-4 Ottumwa, Sioux City, Wilton... 50-3 30-2NORTHWEST TERRITORIES: All other piaces

60-4 40-3 Caribou Crossing, Tagish. 4.50-28 4. 25-27 KANSAS: Atchison, Leavenworth 50-3 30-2 Dawson (city).

5.75 38 5.50-37 All other places. 60-4 40-3 White Horse.

4.75-28 4.50-27 KENTUCKY: Covington, Lexing

NOVA SCOTIA.

50-3 30-2 ton, Louisville, Newport

40-3 30-2 Ohio: Bellaire, Bridgeport, BrilAll other places... 50-3 30-2 liant, Martin's Ferry

35-2 25-1 KLONDIKE: See Alaska and

All other places.

40-3 30-2 Northwest Territories.

OKLAHOMA TERRITORY

75-5 60-4 LOUISIANA 60-4 40-3 ONTARIO..

40-3 30-2 MAINE.. 25-2 25-1 OREGON

1.00-7 1.00-7 MANITOBA

75-5 60-4 PENNSYLVANIA: Philadelphia 20-1 20-1 MARYLAND:

All other places.

25-2 25-1 Aberdeen, Aiken, Annapolis,

QUEBEC: Stanstead

25-2 25-1 Ashland, Baltimore, Barclay

All other places.

40-3 30-2 Sta., Black's, Centreville, Chesa

RHODE ISLAND..

25-2 25-1 peake City, Chestertown, Childs,

SOUTH CAROLINA.

50-3 30-2 Colora, Conowingo, Cordova,

SOUTH DAKOTA

75-5 60-4 Cumberland, Elkton, Frederick,

TENNESSEE: Bristol, Clarksville, Goldsboro, Golt, Greensboro,

Memphis, Nashville..

40-3 30-2 Hagerstown, Hancock, Havre

All other places.

50-3 30-2 de Grace, Henderson, Kennedy

TEXAS: Austin, Dallas, Denison, ville, Lambson, Leslie, Lynch's,

Fort Worth, Gainesville, GalMarydell, Massey, Millington,

veston, Houston, Paris, San North East, Octorora, Perry

Antonio, Sherman, Waco..

75-5 50-3 ville, Port Deposit, Price's,

All other places...

75-5 60-4 Queen Anne, Ridgely, Rising

UTAH

75-5 60-4 Sun, Rowlandsville, Singerly,

VERMONT

25-2 25-1 Sudlersville, Worton..

25-2 25-1VIRGINIA: Berlin, Easton, Federalsburg,

Alexandria, Fredericksburg 25-2 25-1 Salisbury

30-2 25-1 Norfolk, Petersburg, PortsAll other places

40-3 30-2 mouth, Richmond, Staunton, MASSACHUSETTS.

25-2
25-1 West Norfolk.

35-2 25-1 MICHIGAN: Ann Arbor, Bay City,

All other places.

40-3 30-2 Detroit, E. Saginaw, Flint, Mount

WASHINGTON

1.00-7 1. 00-7 Clemens, Port Huron, Saginaw

WEST VIRGINIA: Parkersburg, City, So. Bay City, Ypsilanti... 40-3 30-2 Piedmont, Wheeling

35-2 25-1 All other places 50-3 30-2 All other places

40-3 30-2 MINNESOTA: Duluth, Hastings.

WISCONSIN

50-3 30-2 Minneapolis, Red Wing, St. Paul,

WYOMING..

75-5

60-4

. 25

. 45

25

.98

TELEGRAPH RATES—Continued.

TELEGRAPH RATES TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES. These rates are from New York City. The address and signature are included in the chargeable matter, and the length of words is limited to fifteen letters. When a word is composed of more than fifteen letters, every additional fifteen or the fraction of fifteen letters will be counted as a word. Per Word. Per Word. Per Word.

Per Word. Algeria...

$0.32 Denmark.. $0.35 Melbourne, Vic.... $1.43 Santo Domingo.....$1.32 Alexandria(Egypt) 56 Ecuador..

1.25 Mexico City,$1.75,10 wds. Scotland Antigua .81 England. .25 Nassau (Bahamas). 35 Servia.

36 Argentine Repub.. 1.00 France .25 Natal (So. Africa).. 1.11 Sicily

.32 Austria. .34 Germany. 25 New South Wales.. 1.11 Siam

1.19 Barbados... .91 Gibraltar..

43 New Zealand
1.52 Singapore

1. 35 Belgium 25 Greece 38 Norway: 35 Spain.

40 Bermuda. 42 Guatemala.. 55 Orange River Col'y. 1.11 St. Thomas

96 Bolivia 1.25 Havana

15 Panama
.97 Sweden

39 Brazil.. 1.40 Hayti. 1. 55 Paraguay 1.00 Switzerland

.30 Bulgaria. 38 Holland..

25 Penang...

1. 35 Sydney (N. S. W.). 1.11 Burmah 1.27 Hungary

34 Peru..

1. 25 Tangier Callao (Peru). 1. 25 India. 1.23 Philippine Is. (Lu Tasmania.

1.11 Cairo (Egypt). .61 Ireland zon, Manilla, etc). 2.35 Transvaal

1.11 Cape Colony (S.Af.) 1.11 Italy,..

.32 Other islands. 2. 46 Trinidad Ceylon.. 1. 25 Jamaica .48 Porto Rico

.75 Turkey (Europe).. .37 Chile.. 1.25 Japan.. 1.76 Portugal .39 Turkey (Asia)

47 China.. 1.60 Java. 1.47 Queensland 1.50 Uruguay

1.00 Cochin China.. 1.35 Korea (Seoul). 1.82 Roumania

36 Venezuela

1. 60 Colon.. 97 Malta..

.36 Russia (Europe). 43 Vera Cruz, $1.75, 10 wds. Cyprus..

56 Martinique.. 1.00 Russia (Asia, West) 50 Victoria (Aus.)..... 1.43 Demerara........ 1.44 Matanzas..

.20 Russia (Asia, East). 56 TELEGRAPH AND TELEPHONE STATISTICS.

THE WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH COMPANY. Statement exhibiting the mileage of lines operated, number of offices, number of messages sent, receipts, expenses, and profits for 1870, 1875, 1880, and 1890, and each year from 1894 to 1901 inclusive:

Miles of Poles Miles of YEAR.

Offices.

Receipts.

Messages.
Wire.
and Cables.

Expenses.

Protits. 1870.

54,109 112,191 3,972 9,157,646 $7,138,737.96 $4,910,772.42 $2,227,965.54 1875. 72,833 179,496

6,565 17,153,710 9,564,574.60 6,335,414.77 3,229,157.83 1880.

85,645 233,534 9,077 29,215,509 12,782,894.53 6,948,956.74 5,833,937.79 1890.

183,917 678,997 19,382 55,878,762 22,387,028.91 15,074,303.81 7,312,725.10 1894.

190,303 790,792 21,166 58,632,237 21.852,650.00 16,060,170.00 5,792,485.00 1895.

189,714 802,651 21.360 58,307,315 22,218,019.18 16,076,629.97 6,141,389.21 1896.

189,918 826,929 21,725 58,760,444 22,612,736.28 16,714,756.10 5,897,980.18 1897.

190,614 841,002 21,769 58,151,684 22,638,859.16 16,906,656.03 5,732,203.13 1898.

189,847 874,420 22,210 62,173,749 23,915,732.78 17,825,581.52 6,090,151.26 1899.

189,856 904,633 22,285 61,398,157 23,954,312.05 18,085,579.19 5,868,732.86 1900.

192,705 933,153 22,900 63,167,783 24,758,569.55 18,593,205.87 6,165,363.68 1901.

193,589 972,766 23,238 65,657,049 26,354,150.85 19,668,902.68 6,685,248.17 The average toll per message in 1868 was 104.7: in 1889 was 31.2; in 1890 was 32.4; in 1891 was 32.5; in 1892 was 31.6; in 1893 was 31.2; in 1894 was 30.5; in 1895 was 30.7; in 1896 was 30.9; in 1897 was 30.5; in 1898 was 30.1; in 1899 was 30.8; in 1900 was 30.8; in 1901 was 30.9. The average cost per message to the company in 1868 was 63.4; 'in 1889 was 22.4; in 1890 was 22.7; in 1891 was 23.2; in 1892 was 22.3; in 1893 was 22.7; in 1894 was 23.3; in 1895 was 23.3; in 1896 was 24.0; in 1897 was 24.3; in 1898 was 24.7; in 1899 was 25.1; in 1900 was 25.1; in 1901 was 25.1.

The Postal Telegraph Cable Company also transacts business over a portion of the United States, but the company declines to furnish information of its wire mileage, etc.

GROWTH OF THE TELEGRAPH SERVICE IN THE WORLD. Number of messages, 1870: Norway, 466,700; Sweden, 590,300; Denmark, 513,623; Germany, 8,207,800; Netherlands, 1,837,800; Belgium, 1,998,800; France, 5,663,800; Switzerland, 1,629,235; Spain, 1,050,000, Italy, 2.189,000, Austria,

3,388,249: Hungary, 1,489,000; 'United States, 9,157,646; Great Britain and Ireland, 9,650,000.

Number of messages, 1899-1901: Norway, 2,236,229; Sweden,2,451,708 ; Denmark, 2,215,572; Germany, 44,558,742; Netherlands, 5,218,320; Belgium, 12,550,871; France, 44,515,175; Switzerland, 3,365,024; Spain, 3,452,026; Italy, 9, 704,539, Austria, 14,697,898; Hungary, 13,919,737, Russia, 19,217,238; United States (1901), 75,000,000; Great Britain and Ireland (1900), 90,415,123.

TELEPHONE STATISTICS. The following are the latest statistics made public by the American (Bell) Telephone Company, which at present practically monopolizes the telephone business of the United States. The figures are for January 1 of each year. (See references to independent telephone companies in "Electrical Progress in 1901.'') 1898. 1899. 1900. 1901.

1898. 1899. 1900. 1901. Exchanges.

1,025 1.126 1,239 1,348 Miles of wire sub'ne. 3,675 2,973 3,404 4 203 Branch offices..

937 1,008 1,187 1,427 Total miles of wire.. 620,400 772,989 1,016,777 1,354,202 Miles of wire on poles. . 327,315 396,503 509,036 627,897 Total circuits, 295,904 338,293 422,620 508,262

16,682 19,668 25,741 32,837 Miles of wire undergrnå 282.634 358,184|489,250 705,269 (Total stations......: 384,230 465,180 632.946' 800,880

The number of instruments in the hands of licensees under rental at the beginning of 901 was 1,952,412. The number of exchange connections daily in the United States is 5,668,986, ora total per year of over 1,825,000,000. The average number of daily calls per subscriber is 7 1-10. The capital of the company is $89,100,500. The long-distance company had January 1, 1901. 12,427 miles of pole line and cable, and 167,410 miles of wire connecting 359 offices.

Telephone messages: Austria-Hungary (1899), 116,724,879: Russia (1898), 103,426,088; Germany (1899), 640,324,386; France (1898), 141,226,883; Great Britain (1900), 639,476,448; United States (1901),2,300,000,000.

Electrical Progress in 1901.

IN GENERAL. EXTRAORDINARY commercial activity and development was the characteristic feature of electrical progress during 1901. The unusually prosperous condition of the country at large was quickly reflected in an industry which has so much to do with the home and business life of a very large proportion of the inhabitants of the United States. The telephone has made its way into remote farm houses, and many of the former inconveniences and sometimes hardships involved in farm life have been mitigated or entirely done away with. Electric light and power have come to be used in even small villages and towns to such an extent as to make their use almost universal. In the large cities and in cities and towns devoted principally to manufacturing, enormous quantities of electric current are used in mills and shops of every description to drive machine tools by means of electric motors directly connected to the tools.

The electric automobile made considerable advance, as was clearly shown at the annual Automo. bile Exhibition, held in Madison Square Garden, New York City, in November, 1901. The electric automobile has established itself in a field of its own, and it has now come to be known as the ideal vekicle for city and park use where an unusually large range of operation is not necessary. In this connection, however, it may be said that there are electric automobiles on the market whose manufacturers guarantee a running radius of seventy-five miles on one charge of the storage battery. At an automobile speed contest held on the Coney Island Parkway in November an electric automobile succeeded in making a mile in one minute and three seconds.

Among the new inventions brought out during the year was Mr. Thomas A. Edison's new storage battery, of which great things are expected. Its active elements are nickel and iron. Mr. Edison believes that he has produced a battery which will stand the heavy wear and tear incidental to automobile work, and will at the same time give a greater capacity for a smaller weight of cell. Another new device placed on the market during the year by one of the prominent electrical manufacturing companies was an electrical lamp, giving a light very similar to that made by an arc light, being practically an incandescent filament burning in the open air. Its construction is somewhat complicated, but great results are expected from its operation in practice.

One of the prominent features of the year was the Pan-American Exposition at Buffalo, which, as far as the electrical effects were concerned, bore out all that was prophesied. Electricity was the keynote of the exposition, and the effects there produced were marvellous in their beauty and brilliancy. Incandescent lamps of eight candle-power only were used, no arc lights being employed in the decorative effects on the buildings or grounds. Over 300,000 incandescent lamps were used on the great electric tower and throughout the exposition grounds. Several electrical associations held their annual conventions at Buffalo in connection with the exposition.

THE TELEGRAPH. Wireless telegraphy made a considerable amount of progress in the commercial field during the year just closed. One of the daily newspapers in New York established at the Nantucket Lightship a wireless telegraph station, with which vessels equipped with wireless apparatus can report their arrival and departure nearly 200 miles from Sandy Hook. A considerable number of transatlantic steamship lines equipped their ships with wireless telegraph devices. The Signal Corps of the United States Army through a private contractor succeeded in laying a submarine telegraph cable from Skagway to Juneau, in Alaska. This is a link in the proposed chain of telegraph lines connecting the Klondike region with Seattle and from there with the rest of the world. The Signal Corps also laid several hundred miles of submarine cable connecting various islands in the Philippines with each other and with the important towns.

THE TELEPHONE. The use of the telephone continues to grow with increasing rapidity. The latest developmentin the commercial side of the art is that business men have discovered that one or even two main lines connecting them with their local exchange are not enough for the daily calls over the wire. This has necessitated the installing of what are known as private branch exchanges," with one or more telephone operators in charge at all times. Many of the larger business concerns in New York have private branch exchanges of their own equal in size to those in many of the smaller towns and villages. During the month of June the Independent Telephone Association of the United States of America held its fifth annual convention at Buffalo in connection with the Pan-American Exposition.

This meeting was especially well attended as a result of the tremendous growth of the independent telephone movement during the past year. Independent telephone companies are now active in every State in the Union from Maine to California, and it is predicted that before long several of the larger cities of the United States will be equipped with independent telephone systems. In the State of Indiana alone there are at the present time over 53,000 independent telephone subscribers. In Philadelphia an independent company is actively at work installing its plant, and expects to have 7,000 subscribers connected with its exchanges by February 1, 1902. It is also stated that an independent telephone company will within a year provide service for New York City.

About November 1 ihe New York Telephone Company converted its Cortlandt Street Exchange to the common battery system, which does away with the battery at the subscriber's station. This was the last exchange of the city to be changed over, and all the exchanges in the borough of Manhattan are now common battery. During the past three years the New York Telephone Company has practically rebuilt its entire plant, changing every subscriber's instrument and equipping every exchange with new apparatus throughout in order to accomplish the change to relay working. During the past three years a gain of about 40,000 subscribers has been made. The total number of stations in Manhattan and the Bronx at the end of the year was almost 70,000.

ELECTRIC LIGHTING. The progress in electric lighting during the year was chiefly confined to commercial growth. The new Waterside plant of the New York Edison Company was practically finished. This plant when it is entirely completed will generate 130,000 horse-power of electric current, making it the largest central electric-lighting station in the world. There are now 2,842 central electric-lighting plants in the United States, having a combined capitalization of $670,000,000. The largest number of electriclight plants in any State is found in Illinois, while the largest capital invested is in Pennsylvania.

A novel device which made its appearance during the year is an electric incandescent lamp which can be turned down from sixteen candle-power to one candle-power or the reverse. This lamp was

ELECTRICAL PROGRESS IN 1901-Continued.

designed to supply the need for a night light in sick rooms and in such other places as require a small amount of light all night.

ELECTRIC POWER. The electric elevator is rapidly growing in commercial favor, and is now almost universally used in large buildings which are equipped with their own lighting plants. The us of the electric motor direct-coupled to machine tools is growing in practice, and man: small manufacturing, plants which have heretofore made their own power from gas or steam engines ar, beginning to realize the advantage of taking their power supply from the underground mains of the local electric-light plant. In New York City alone the central electric-lighting stations supply about 50,000 horse-power of electrical energy which is used exclusively to drive electric motors. During 1901 there were probably more electric fan-motors sold than in any previous year since the device was placed upon the market. During the hot spell last Summer one of the electrical supply houses in New York sold over 400 fan motors in one day.

ELECTRIC. TRANSMISSION. The Niagara Falls Power Company made a second large extension of its plant at Niagara Falls, N. Y., during 1901, and is now the largest electric transmission company in the world. The General Electric Company, whose extensive plant is at Schenectady, N. Y.. receives its power from a waterpower plant located at Mechanicville, some miles away. The numerous electric transmission plants throughout the West are proving of tremendous benefit to the surrounding territory and have produced profitable returns for their stockholders.

ELECTRIC TRACTION. During uctober the American Street Railway Association held its twentieth annual convention in New York City.o In connection with the convention an exhibition of street railway apparatus and appliances was held in Madison Square Garden. The crowds which came to view the exhibition demonstrated the great public inte in apparatus of his rt, and it is believed that a hall twice the size of Madison Square Garden could have been filled, About 2,500 delegates and supply dealers attended the meeting of the American Street Railway Association.

During 1901 the Metropolitan Street Railway Company of New York City completed the change of its Broadway, Columbus Avenue, and Lexington Avenue lines from cable to electric power. The company also equipped one of its borse-car lines, that on Seventh Avenue, with the electric underground system, and is at present building

a new line in the northern part of the city known as the Kingsbridge Road Line. The motive power of the Christopher and West Tenth Street lines, between

Considerable progress was made during the year toward the installation of the third-rail electric system on the various elevated lines of the Manhattan Railway Company, and it is believed that early in the new year at least one of the elevated lines will be operated by electric current.

\mmigration Xnto the United States, 1820-1901.

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Total Alien

Total

Total Passengers. YEAR. Immigrants. YEAR. Immigrants. 104,565 1864 193,195 1885

395,346 52,496 1865 247, 453 1886

334,203 78, 615 1866 163,594 1887

490,109 114 371 Fiscal yearend'g June 30 1888

546,889 154,416 1867 298, 967 1889

444, 427 234,968 1868 282,189 1890

455, 302 226,527 1869 352,569 1891

560, 319 297,024 1870 387, 203 1892

623,084 369,986 1871 321, 350 1893

502, 917 379, 466 1872 404,806 1894

314, 467 371,603 1873 459,803 1895

279,948 368,645 1874 313, 339 1896

343, 267 427,833 1875 227,498 1897

230,832 200,877 1876 169,986 1898

229, 299 195,857 1877 141,857 1899

311, 715 246,945 1878 138,469 1900

448,572 119,501 1879 177,826 1901

487,918 118,616 1880

457, 257 150,237 1881

669, 431 Total....... 20, 253, 073 89,724 1882

788,992 89, 207 1883

603,322 1789 to 1820 est. 250,000 174,524 1884

518,592

of the whole number of immigrants in the fiscal year ending June 30, 1901, 388,931 came through the customs district of New York, 17,216 th rough Baltimore, 25, 616 through Boston, 13, 236 through Philadelphia, 3,655 through San Francisco, and 39,264 through other ports; total, 467,918.

The reported occupations of immigrants arriving during the fiscal year 1901 were as follows: Laborers, 161,9:38; farmers, 3,035; servants, 42,027; carpenters, 6,508; miners, 3,629; clerks, 3,108; tailors, 9, 609; shoemakers, '5,451; blacksmiths, 2.613; bakers, '2,192; seamstresses and dressmakers, 4,232; masons, 3, 414; mariners. 4,695; merchant dealers and grocers, 6,589. The total number of professional immigrants was 2,665; of miscellaneous, 272,064; of no occupation (including women and children), 148,686; occupation not stated, 3, 469.

The nationality of immigrants in the fiscal year ending June 30, 1901, was as follows: AustriaHungary, 113,390; German Empire, 21.651; Italy, including Sicily and sardinia, 135, 996; Norway, 12, 248; Sweden, 23,331: Roumania, 7,155; Russian Empire and Finland, 85, 257; England, 12,214; Ireland, 30,561; Scotland, 2,070; Wales, 201; China, 2,459; other Asia, 11, 134; West Indies and Miquelon, 3,176; all other countries, 26,575; total, 487,918.

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