The Educational Journal of Virginia, Volume 9

Front Cover
Charles Henry Winston, Thomas Randolph Price, D. Lee Powell, H. H. Harris, John Meredith Strother, William Fayette Fox, Harry Fishburne Estill (F.), John P. McGuire, Rodes Massie, Richard Ratcliffe Farr, John Lee Buchanan, George R. Pace
Educational Publishing House, 1877
 

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Page 205 - And further that all parents and masters do breed and bring up their children and apprentices in some honest, lawful calling, labor, or employment, either in husbandry or some other trade profitable for themselves and the commonwealth, if they will not, nor can not, train them up in learning to fit them for higher employments...
Page 482 - Book ; all men's Book ! It is our first, oldest statement of the never-ending Problem — man's destiny, and God's ways with him here in this earth. And all in such free, flowing outlines ; grand in its sincerity, in its simplicity ; in its epic melody, and repose of reconcilement. There is the seeing eye, the mildly understanding heart. So true, every way ; true eyesight and vision for all things ; material things no less than spiritual : the Horse — ' hast thou clothed his neck with thunder /'...
Page 258 - Nothing is so contagious as enthusiasm; it is the real allegory of the tale of Orpheus — it moves stones, it charms brutes. Enthusiasm is the genius of sincerity, and truth accomplishes no victories without it.
Page 482 - I call that, apart from all theories about it, one of the grandest things ever written with pen. One feels, indeed, as if it were not Hebrew ; such a noble universality, different from noble patriotism or sectarianism, reigns in it. A noble Book ; all men's Book ! It is our first, oldest statement of the never-ending Problem, — man's destiny and God's ways with him here in this earth.
Page 404 - There shall be reserved the lot No. 16, of every township, for the maintenance of public schools, within the said township...
Page 349 - These periodicals seem to be intended for boys from twelve to sixteen years of age, although they often treat of older persons. Probably many boys outgrow them and come to see the folly and falsehood of them. It is impossible, however, that so much corruption should be afloat and not exert some influence. We say nothing of the great harm which is done to boys of that age, by the nervous excitement of reading harrowing and sensational stories, because the literature before us only participates in...
Page 258 - However listless the limbs may have been when sustaining a too heavy heart, here they are braced, and the lagging gait becomes buoyant again. However perverse the memory may have been in presenting all that was agonizing, and insisting only on what cannot be retrieved, here it is...
Page 394 - Greek models. First of all, he may look to the best modern speeches (as he probably has already) ; Burke's best compositions, as The Thoughts on the Cause of the present Discontents ; speech " On the American Conciliation...
Page 205 - ... aforementioned, whereby children and servants become rude, stubborn, and unruly, the said selectmen with the help of two magistrates shall take such children or apprentices...
Page 194 - Mother, for love of grace, Lay not that flattering unction to your soul, That not your trespass, but my madness, speaks : It will but skin and film the ulcerous place, While rank corruption, mining all within, Infects unseen.

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