Page images
PDF
EPUB
[graphic][ocr errors][merged small]
[ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]

Euphrates and Tigris, and the Araxes and Phosis; while others believe that it was between the Euphrates and Tigris, near their junction-about 130 miles N. of the Persian Gulf. That one of these localities contained the Garden of Eden there can be but little doubt, as there is no other place which so nearly meets the requirements of the Scripture account.

MOUNT ARARAT

is in Armenia, 775 miles N.E. of Jerusalem, about 300 E. of the Caspian Sea, and is in 39° 30′ N. lat. and 43° 40′ E. lon. from Greenwich. It rises directly out of the plain of the Araxes, and is the loftiest and most imposing mountain in this region, being 17,560 feet above the level of the sea. About 1,200 feet below the highest summit is a secondary summit, and between the two there is a gentle depression, in which it is believed the ark rested.

Arguri is the only village known to have been built on the slopes of this mountain, and according to tradition it is the place where Noah planted his vineyard. At the foot of the mountain is Nachdjevan, where the patriarch is reported to have been

buried.

THE IMMEDIATE DESCENDANTS OF NOAH, AND THEIR LOCATION, OR THE PLACES OCCUPIED BY THEM.

"And the sons of Noah that went forth of the ark these are the were Shem, Ham, and Japhet

[ocr errors]

Bons of Noah; and of them was the whole earth overspread." (Gen. ix.)

Of the descendants of Ham, were Nimrod and Canaan. Nimrod settled in the land of Shinar, a district above the junction of the rivers Euphrates and Tigris. "And the beginning of his kingdom was Babel, and Erech, and Accad, and Calneh, in the land of Shinar."-(Gen. x.)

Canaan occupied the east coast of the Mediterranean, from Sidon to Gaza, including the hill country in which Jerusalem was built.

The descendants of Shem were distributed from Mesha on the Persian Gulf, and towards Sephar, a mount of the east. "By these were the isles of the Gentiles divided in their lands; every one after his tongue, after their families, in their nations."

CHAPTER IX.

THE FIRST CITIES BUILT-THEIR RISE, FALL, AND RUINS AS NOW SEEN.*

Babylon, its vast extent-its fall-its remarkable ruins-Erech-Accad-Calneh-Nineveh, a sketch of its history-Its wonderful ruins and inscrip Damascus Shechem Gaza-- Bethel

tions

Bethlehem-Sidon-Jericho.

[ocr errors]

BABYLON.

ITS VAST EXTENT-ITS FALL-ITS REMARKABLE RUINS

BABEL, or Babylon, is the first in order of the four cities built or occupied by Nimrod. It is 300 miles N. w. of the Persian Gulf, 200 above the junction of the river Euphrates with the Tigris, and 530 miles E. N. E. of Jerusalem. Herodotus, who visited Babylon after its conquest by Cyrus, is considered the best authority as to a description of the city, as his account is corroborated by the testimony and researches of all subsequent writers, and by the explorations and excavations of the present age.

He describes the city as a quadrangle of 15 miles on each side, surrounded, first, by a deep, wide moat, filled with water; and next by a wall 87 feet wide and 60 feet high. The 30 lower courses of brick in

* Hebron, Beeroth, Hamath, Jerusalem, and Tyre, are also reckoned among the first cities.

[ocr errors]
« PreviousContinue »