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sugar canes, cotton, balsam, ary to sleep all night on the and other drugs," load their roofs of their houses. The fields,

history of the crusades proves Vegetables are in equal the mildness of the climate. abundance as the coulcas, not In those wars, sieges, marches, unlike the potatoe, the okoe, a and battles proceeded in every rich mucilaginous vegetable, month of the year, without rewhich gives a beautiful flavor gard to the heat of summer or to their soups, also excellent cold of winter, cabbages, cauliflowers, spinage, The multitude of fish, which lettuce, endive, turnips, cu- inhabit the waters of Palestine, cumbers, radishes, and onions, is another circumstance, favor: extremely mild. So mild, and able to the population of this pleasant is the climate, that it country. Doubdan

says,

"that may support many more in- the Mediterranean between Sihabitants than a cold country don and Joppa abounds with of the same extent. “Though fish.” Thevenot informs us it seldom rains,

rains, abundant that, “Large fish are caught in dews secure a luxuriant crop, the Tigris. Irwin relates, that in and the cold is never severe, the Red Sea are fish in abund. while the heats of summer are

The pleasarit waters of constantly moderated by cool. their lake, or the sea of Tiberias ing breezes. Russel' says, abound with a variety of fish “They are so free from frost, of exquisite taste and shape." that they may plough all win- Speaking of this lake, Le Bruyn ter,” and “that the most deli- says, “On what side soever I cate at Aleppo need no fire cast my eye upon the shore, I till November." De Herbelot saw a fish swim.” Josephus says "that February puts an says, it had in it a great variety end to fire for the use of of fish, which for taste and warming themselves.”

Dr. shape were not to be found any Chandler, and his company in where else.” Thus scripture, their travels here in October, and authentic history coincide, slept in the open air, the shep- and the objections of infidels herds did the same. We learn vanish. If it now be inquired from Shaw and Chardin, that why the people are so poor, their cattle have no shelter; while the lands and waters are neither does the farmer mow so rich, we conceive a satisin summer to preserve the factory answer is not difficult. flocks in winter. It is custom. No man has spirit to toil and

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this fine country; so that who travellers. The following facts
ever sows is uncertain who demonstrate its fertility.
shall gather the harvest. He The plain of Acra for want
says, “I travelled in Syria, in of culture is overrun with
December and January; the weeds, as high as the horses
whole country looked verdant, backs; a tree on Lebanon is 12
and cheerful.” Mr. Wood, yards 6 inches in circumfer-
another observing travelier, tells ence, 37 yards in the spread of
us, "The valley of Bochat, in its boughs, which divides at
which Baalbec is situated, the height of 5 yards into 5
might be rendered one of the branches, each equal to a large
most beautiful places in Syria, tree.” That man has not be-
for it is more fertile than the gun his observations on differ-
celebrated vale of Damascus, ent soils, who imagines that
whose clusters of grapes, ac- such weeds, or such trees rise
cording to Lucas, weighed 30 from any, but the richest lands.
or 40 pounds, and better water. In Maine, New Hampshire, and
ed than the rich plains of Es. Vermont their most lofty trees
drelon, and Rama.

The re

are found only in their richest gion round Joppa, Lusignan vales and plains. Accordingcalls “This fertile country.” ly Bowen, and others, say that The Baron De Tott, speaking "without manuring, and plowof the country between Joppa, ing only with a wooden couland Rama, says, “six leagues ter, one horse, or a yoke of in breadth it is extremely fer- oxen, Palestine produces a tile." Thevenot says he was great variety of the richest “stricken with the corn land, fowers, plants, herbs, and the meadows, and fair cattle, in fruits." "The abundance of the neighborhood of Gaza.” its produce not only supplied A native of the country says, its own millions, but furnished “In both the Galilees there are neighboring kingdoms with fat, and fruitful pastures, and great quantities of oil and oththey are planted with all kinds er commodities.” Pulse of of trees, so as to entice those, all sorts, fruits of all kinds, who are no lovers of husband- which might be called perpet ry. The country of Samaria ual, new buds appearing beis wonderfully fruitful. Judea fore the old fruit was ripe, ci. like Samaria is mountainous trons, apples of Paradise, vines, and rich, fit for husbandry. which yielded grapes three But we need not inquire of times in a year, dates, melons,

sugar canes, cotton, balsam, ary to sleep all night on the and other drugs," load their roofs of their houses. The fields.

history of the crusades proves Vegetables are in equal the mildness of the climate. abundance as the coulcas, not In those wars, sieges, marches, unlike the potatoe, the okoe, a and battles proceeded in every rich mucilaginous vegetable, month of the year, without rewhich gives a beautiful flavor gard to the heat of summer or to their soups, also excellent cold of winter. cabbages, cauliflowers, spinage, The multitude of fish, which lettuce, endive, turnips, cu- inhabit the waters of Palestine, cumbers, radishes, and onions, is another circumstance, favor. extremely mild. So mild, and able to the population of this pleasant is the climate, that it country. Doubdan says, "that may support many more in the Mediterranean between Sihabitants than a cold country don and Joppa abounds with of the same extent. “Though fish.” Thevenot informs us it seldom rains, abundant that, “Large fish are caught in dews secure a luxuriant crop, the Tigris. Irwin relates, that in and the cold is never severe, the Red Sea are fish in abundwhile the heats of summer are

The pleasarit waters of constantly moderated by cool. their lake, or the sea of Tiberias ing breezes. Russel says, abound with a variety of fish “They are so free from frost, of exquisite taste and shape.”' that they may plough all win- Speaking of this lake, Le Bruyn ter," and "that the most deli. says, “On what side soever I cate at Aleppo need no fire cast my eye upon the shore, I till November.” De Herbelot saw a fish swim.” Josephus says “that February puts an says, it had in it a great variety end to fire for the use of of fish, which for taste and warming themselves."

Dr. shape were not to be found any Chandler, and his company in where else.” Thus scripture, their travels here in October, and authentic history coincide, slept in the open air, the shep- and the objections of infidels herds did the same. We learn vanish. If it now be inquired from Shaw and Chardin, that why the people are so poor, their cattle have no shelter; while the lands and waters are neither does the farmer mow so rich, we conceive a satisin summer to preserve the factory answer is not difficult. flocks in winter. It is custom. No man has spirit to toil and

ance.

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sow, when it is quite uncertain ing the property of a prosper. who shall reap the harvest. ous man, he requires him to Dr. Adam says, that the inhab- contribute a sum beyond his itants have no property real or power; when he fails of propersonal. When a father dies, ducing the sum, his own life the estate goes to the sultan, and the lives of his relatives, He arrogates a right to all the are often the forfeiture. These lands. A traveller asserts, he things being facts, is any man had often seen the husband- of reflection surprised that we man sowing, accompanied by now look in vain for the anan armed friend to prevent his cient splendor and population being robbed of his seed. An- of this country? Does not all other says, he had seen the A. appear natural, and satisfactory rabs appeased by handfuls of to the eye not made dim by wheat given them in harvest. infidelity? Under so many emThe arm of government is barrassments would it be strange strong enough “to oppress and should famine and desolation crush” the wretched subject, follow? should the despot who but has not power to protect oppresses, and the robber stainhim from rapine and violence, ed with blood, both be left to Therefore, it is as different starve together? Instead of this, writers inform us, “that large so excellent are the soil and tracts of the country are uncul- climate, that the inhabitants are tivated.” The tyranny of the generou:ly supported; wheat, Turkish government has re- barley, pulse of all kinds, fruits, duced many parts of it to a wine, and oil, are produced in mere waste wilderness. One such quantities, that they are instance of oppression may give distributed in the neighboring an idea of the rest. In the sea provinces of Syria. Among its of Galilee, where formerly ma- productions are also silk, tony people obtained support, bacco, drugs, and aromatic where many ships were con. herbs. Wheat, barley, pulse, stantly loaded with excellent and other valuable commodi. fish, now not a single boat ties are transported to the culleaves the shore, not a solitary tivated shores of Europe. A hook is cast into the water, so person, who was there in 1801, heavily is the fishery taxed by relates, that the most remarkathe Turkish government. If ble thing in the country is the the avaricious Pacha finds no cheapness of provisions, wine plausible pretext for confiscat. being two pence per bottle, and

figs three half pence per pound; hostilities continued between cheese is very plenty: that it these two kingdoms; that of may with propriety be styled Israel taking the name of Sa“the Land of Promise," "a maria from its capital. The land flowing with milk and inhabitants were a mixture of honey.” Every thing is in the old Israelites, and of new great abundance; the country colonies sent there by the kings wants for nothing. When the of Assyria, after their conquest Jews shall return to this de- of it, till they were subdued lightful land of springs and by the Maccabees, and their brooks, of hills, plains, and metropolis destroyed. Under the luxuriant vales; when this ac- Romans it began to be divided tive people shall once more in- into tetrarchies and toparchies. habit this enchanting spot, The larger were those of Judea, where the Prince of peace ac

Samaria, and Galilee, Upper complished the work of re. and Lower; the less, those of demption; when a just and en. Geraritica, Sarona, and others ergetic government, and the of less note; all which lay on mild spirit of Christianity shall this side Jordan. The rest on be restored, probably more than the other side, were those of 8,000,000 souls will again en- Gilead,Peraca, Gaulonitis, Au. joy this happy clime, rebuild ranitis, Batanea, and Decapolis. her cities and palaces, throng Josephus mentions another dim her temples, and swell her vision made in Gabinius's time, songs of praise.

into 5 diséricts, as he styles The next remarkable divi- them Counsels, agreeable to the sion was made by king Slo- Roman manner; these were Je. mon, who divided his king. rusalem, Jericho, and Sepho is, dom, into 12 provinces or dis- on this side Jorda; and Gadatricts, each under a peculiar of. ris, and Amathus on the other ficer, and every one of these side. In the reigns of the was to supply the king with Christian emperors, it was diprovisions for his household in vided afresh into Palestina Pri. his turn, that is, each for one ma, Palestina Secunda, and month in a year, 1 Kings iv, 7, Palestina Tertia, or Salutaris; &c.

which last included a far greatUnder the second teraple, the er part, if not the whole coundistinction of Israel and Judah try, as is known to all who are lasted a considerable time, and acquainted with history. On the same bloody hatred, and that account we shall wave

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