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will save many desperate cases. If your
patient is Anaemic, Consumptive, Dyspep-
tic, he needs good, live, healthy blood for
his salvation. But how shall he get it?
If the alimentary process has failed to keep
up the nourishing and supporting contents
of the blood, there is but one thing to do, and
ten thousand fold experience has proved that
that one thing is this—where nature fails to
produce good and sufficient Blood, We Can
Introduce It from the arteries of the
sturdy bullock by the medium of

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BOVININE

BOVININE is the living blood conserve, and
to every properly equipped physician who
will test its properties microscopically, phys-
ically, or therapeutically, it will speak for
itself. Send for our scientific treatise on
topical and internal administration and re-
ports of hundreds of cases.

THE BOVININE CO.,
75 West Houston St., New York.

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When addressing our advertisers mention The Reporter.

S

veal that a very heavy percentage of cases of ment fee, or more, to the nurses in attenddiabetes mellitus can have their origin ance, who, to use their own words, make traced to the causes here set forth.

their living from "following the doctors." In my experience I have found that while This tipping of the nurses is done with the dietary limitations decrease the amount of hope that the recipient of the fee will recsugar, I have not been able to see that the ommend the doctor to future patients and, general health has been markedly improved, in other words, act.as his drummer. As The and in some instances, the withdrawal of Lancet editorially comments, the probability sweets, and other restrictions of diet have is that things are not quite as bad as this not materially lessened its excretion.

correspondent makes them out to be, even Some two years ago my attention was in England, where tipping is such a common called to arsenauro as a therapeutic agent every-day and every-where affair.—Journal for this disease, and as arsenic had on the of the American Medical Association. whole given better results than any other drugs, I gave it an extended trial. The re- NEWSPAPER MEDICINE.—MRS. THOMAS SHELsults in all cases were better than those wită ton was operated on this morning at the other remedies, and in the probably neurotic home of her son Alfred, for necrosis of the cases cures were effected in nearly every in- bone, by Dr. Herrick, assisted by Drs. Burke stance. In almost every case the amount of and Coutant. A piece of dead bone was resugar became noticeably lessened within a moved from the tibia of the right eye. period of ten days or two weeks; one case Country Newspaper. was practically cured in two months, and in others repeated tests showed no trace of su

VERY FEW CITIES IN THE COUNTRY POSSESS gar in from three to four months. The gen- a finer hotel than the Hollenden, which has eral health improved in every instance, the been chosen as the official headquarters of drug in no case causing any untoward dis- the American Institute of Homeopathy at its turbance, either local or general. In ema

next meeting, which is to be held in Cleveciated cases an increase in weight and better land color, due to a marked increase in red blood

Tue Hollenden is a high-class transient corpuscles, was noticed even before any

and residential hotel, situated at the corner marked diminution of the sugar occurred.

of Superior, Bond and Vincent streets, in In conclusion, it may not be amiss to say

the city of Cleveland, accessible to all street that at least two of these cases first pre

car lines, principal buildings, places of sented themselves to me on account of having

amusement, and in the centre of the business been refused life insurance because of sugar

and shopping district. in the urine, nor is it amiss to add that with

It has four hundred rooms, each connected in the last few months both cases have been

with the office by telephone, and furnished accepted for policies of good amounts, no

with every comfort of home. No expense has sugar being found after repeated tests, the

been spared to surround its guests with writer not being the examiner in either in

every convenience. Parlors, reception and stance.-Abstract H. D. B.

drawing rooms, handsomely furnished, are

provided for the patrons of the hotel and FEEING THE NURSE.-EVIDENTLY THINGS ARE their friends. getting in bad shape in England, if we are The accommodations and capacity of the to believe the statement made by a corres- h tel for caring for large conventions, meet. pondent in a recent number of The Lancet.

ings, etc., is unequalled by any hotel in the There are rumors that there is a division country. of the fee among some of the members of the profession here, but this division is be- BE SURE AND READ THE ADVERTISEMENTS IN tween the surgeon or the consultant and the this number. If there is any preparation family physician of the patient. On the which you would like to try do not hesitate other side, however, they seem to have gone to write the advertiser for samples, menone better and a division of the fee is made tioning the Reporter. with the nurse. According to the correspondent, certain medical men over there are pay. Thought HE WAS COMPARATIVELY SAFE.— ing sums from a shilling to half the confine. A colored man, at Pittsburg, Kansas, thus When addressing our advertisers mention the Reporter.

“It is hard for a student of pulmonary consumption to sufficiently emphasize the immense importance of food as a cure or rather nutrition which depends upon food.”

Chas. Fox Gardiner, M. D., The Care of the Consumptive.

The difficult problem of proper nutrition in Tuberculosis is satisfactorily solved by the use of the Standard Food yo yo yo yo yo yo ya

Imperial Granum

It contains the most nutrition with least tax on the digestive organs, is easily administered with any form of milk or with water alone, and is unsweetened, so that the patient does not tire of its continued use. Samples are FREE to physicians. John Carle & Sons, Dept. R, 153 Water St., New York

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WILL GIVE INSTANT RELIEF IN PLEURISY

PELVIC INFLAMMATION BOILS PNEUMONIA INFLAMED BREASTS ERYSIPELAS BRONCHITIS TUMORS

BUBOES TONSILITIS BURNS

DYSMENORRHOEA PERITONITIS SUNBURN

FELONS
SYNOVITIS
PERIOSTITIS

SPRAINS
OSTEITIS
CHRONIC ULCERS

INFECTED SORES
ORCHITIS
FROST BITES

PILES (EXTERNAL)

It is an ideal poultice, being antiseptic, non-poisonous and soothing, and is far superior to germ-breeding flax seed and other septic poultices. It can be reheated by applying hot water bottle, thus keeping the patient from being exposed and avoiding the bad effects of irregular poulticing.

50

PRICE AND PACKAGE Terrine is put up in friction top air-tight cans, and contain respectively /lb., 1 lb. and 2 lbs., full weight, and of convenient shape for heating.

Half pounds (full weight) 35 cents.
Pounds
Two pounds“ - 85

SAMPLE PACKAGE Upon receipt of 25 cents we will express to any physicians in the United States a one pound sa mple package, express prepaid.

THE PARSONS DRUG CO. (Incorporated)

317 Prospect St., Cleveland, Ohio, U. S. A.

When addressing our advertisers mention the Reporter.

low.

in th

he ev

ounces of glyco-thymoline (Kress) in a pint to readers of the Reporter, enclosing their of warm water, irrigated the bladder twice professional card to the following address: a day for three days; cause seemed to be en- John R. Carle & Sons, Dept. R., 153 Water tirely eradicated, and patient is in good St., New York City.-H. D. B. health for the first time in a year.”

WHAT THE GIRL SAW.-THE DUTIES OF A WOULD COME BACK.—IKEY, JR. "FADER

certain sea captain kept him a long time I soldt a pair of pants to Mr. Cheatman for

away from home. During his enforced absix-fifty, but he only had six tollars, and vill

sence his wife had become quite a society

Tady. So, when her husband returned, a stop in tomorrow and pay der rest.” Ikey, Sr.—“Mine son, you've been swin.

recherche reception was given complimendled. He von't come back.”

tary to him. He had not been drilled in Ikey, Jr.—"Oh, yes he vill, fader.

manners and other things esthetic, and did

I gif him a pair dree sizes too small.”—Baltimore

no. have clothes suitable for the occasion. World.

His wife finally prevailed upon him to have

a full-dress suit made. The style of the JONATHAN HUTCHINSON, F. R. S., GENERAL

trousers and coat was excusable, but he Secretary of the New Sydenham Society, has could not see the sense of having the vest requested Messrs. P. Blakiston's Son & Co., of

cut s

ction Philadelphia, the American agents of the we donned his dress suit and wore a button Society, to announce the publication of “An in the lapel of his coat, the only evidence of Atlas of Clinical Medicine, Surgery and

his rank and profession. Pathology,” selected and arranged with the

At the reception, a young lady who had design to afford, in as complete a manner as

been introduced to him stood conversing possible, aids to diagnosis in all departments

with him and noticed the button in the lapel of practice. It is proposed to complete the

of his coat. "I see you're naval,” she said. work in five years, in fasciculi form, eight

With suffused and perspiring face, nervously to ten plates issued every three months in

fingering in the region of his umbilicus, the connection with the regular publications of captain stammered: 1 told the tailor ne the Society. The New Sydenham Society was cutting that d- n vest too low.”Ex. was established in 1858, with the object of publishing essays, monographs and transla

WE TAKE PLEASURE IN ANNOUNCING THE tions of works which could not be otherwise publication of the New Century Edition of issued. The list of publications numbers

the catalogue of Otis Clapp & Son, Boston, upwards of 170 volumes of the greatest Mass. scientific value. An effort is now being made It has been their aim in its preparation to increase the membership, in order to ex- not only to produce a price list of medicines tend its work.

and supplies, but also to make it a valuable

book of reference. It contains a therapeutic THE NURSING WORLD CLINICAL RECORD. — appendix, which is devoted to a brief descripThe well known wholesale druggists, John tion of some of the more important of the Carle & Sons, of 153 Water street, New York newer remedies, special pharmaceutical City, who were established in 1817, and who preparations from their laboratories and have for so many years been headquarters other items of interest to the physician. This for the justly celebrated food, Imperial appendix gives an epitome of therapeutic inGranum, inform us that they are publishing dications of some of the newer remedies, and a new and vastly improved edition of their the results of clinical experience in the use Nursing World Clinical Record, which, in of their pharmaceutical preparations. We the past few years, has already run through believe that every one of our readers will six editions. The special features of the new . find something new which will be of value book are simplicity of arrangement, detach- to him and amply repay him for a careful able leaves, with a special table for record. perusal of this section of the catalogue. ing the temperature on each sheet. Grievous JOHN CARLE & Sons, SHIPPING DEPOT FOR mistakes are oftentimes avoided by supply the world for IMPERIAL GRANUM, have ing the nurse with a sick room chart which recently received the following communicacan be legibly discerned and easily kept. tion which we feel the readers of the ReSample copies of the Record will be sent porter will be interested to see: When addressing our advertisers mention the Reporter.

THE BEST ALKALINE WASH.

BY W. HARPUR SLOAN, M. D., Chief Ear Department, Medico-chirurgical

College, Philadelphia, Pa. There are many alkaline preparations on the market that are used daily with varied results in conditions where such a preparation is indicated. I have tried most of them in all conditions and after an impartial trial I am compelled to say that the preparation known as Glyco Thymoline, made by Kress & Owen Co., stands at the head of the list; its formula is one that would commend its use, the ingredients being of an antiseptic and non-irritating nature.

Having formed this opinion of Glyco Thymoline, I have concluded to report a few clinical cases where it has given me good results,

Case 1. M. L., age 23 years, came under my care suffering with a distressing case of Ozena. The turbinated bones on both sides of her nose presented a condition of marked atrophy; there was a complete loss of smell and taste and a formation of crusts in the nasal chamber; stench of same was foul. She complained of continual headache, and other symptoms of a depleted and run down system. I placed her on a tonic of Iron, Arsenic and Strychnia internally; locally I ordered the use of Glyco Thymoline in a Bermingham Douche three times a day, diluted. After a month's treatment the crusts had ceased to form, there was a complete restoration of taste and a slight return of smell; the general health was improved and the patient herself well satisfied with results.

Case 2. C. A., age eight years, came to me suffering from a severe Otorrhoea following Scarlet Fever. There was a muco-purulent discharge from both ears that rendered the child completely deaf; the auditory canal was excoriated and sore and the general health below par. I used Cod Liver Oil internally and syringed the ears three times a day with Glyco Thymoline. At the end of one month the discharge of pus had stopped; the hearing much improved and the child's general health very much improved.

Case 3. J. W., age 25 years, came under my care suffering with an aggravated case of Cystitis, which had been treated by several of our best physicians without much improvement. He had great pain in the

region of the bladder and the loins, which became worse on urination; a heavy deposit of mucus and some blood in the urine made his condition still more distressing. His temperature was 100, which would rise a degree during the periods of pain. I used the usual treatment for such cases, without positive results, when I thought of irrigating the bladder with Glyco Thymoline (diluted). This I did once in twenty-four hours, at the same time giving him Glyco Thymoline internally in teaspoonful doses every three hours. For the first two days I did not see much improvement, on the third day there was no blood and less mucus in the urine. I continued this treatment for two weeks, when I discharged him cured.

Case 4. · J. H., age 35 years, consulted me or Pruritus Ani which had troubled him for several years; his business compelled him to sit the best part of the day. He had used various ointments, prescriptions, etc., for this troublesome affection, with only temporary relief. At his first visit I ordered him to bathe the rectum twice daily with castile soap and warm water, then to apply Glyco Thymoline, half strength to the parts. After persisting for a time, the swelling and severe itching were lessened, and then left him altogether.

A SEEMING PARADOX.-Many physicians in widely separated parts of the country have reported an experience with the use of Gray's Tonic which is well worth the serious consideration of every physician. The experience is briefly this: the peculiar hyper-sensitive condition of the nervous system, commonly designated "nervous ness" or "nervous irritability," is almost immediately relieved by the regular dosage of Gray's Tonic.

This condition is but a manifestation of exhaustion of the nervous system, which can be permanently overcome only by the persistent judicious application of therapeutic measures, which have for their object the restoration of tone to the nervous system and to the processes of cellular nutrition. But while these measures are being applied the symptoms continue, i. e., the patient is nervous, irritable, mentally disquieted and sleepless, and it is upon these symptoms that Gray's Tonic exercises a peculiar calming and soothing effect.

Indeed, it is asserted that this sedative effect is in many cases more prompt than

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