The Authentic Life of William McKinley ...: Together with a Life Sketch of Theodore Roosevelt ...

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William McKinley was born at Niles, Ohio, in 1843, the son of William and Nancy Allison McKinley. He was a descendants of David McKinley (1756-1840), a Revolutionary War soldier. He married Ida Saxton, daughter of James A. Saxon, at Canton, Ohio, in 1871. They had two daughters, who died in childhood. He was elected the 25th president of the United States in 1896 and 1900 and was assassinated at Buffalo, New York, in 1901. Theodore Roosevelt became the 26th president of the United States after his death.

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Page 9 - Besides, this Duncan Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been So clear in his great office, that his virtues Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking-off...
Page 323 - Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. which according to his abundant mercy hath begotten us again unto a lively hope by the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. To an inheritance incorruptible, and undefiled, and that fadeth not away, reserved in heaven for you, Who are kept by the power of God through faith unto salvation ready to be revealed in the last time.
Page 336 - The beauty of Israel is slain upon thy high places : how are the mighty fallen ! Tell it not in Gath, publish it not in the streets of Askelon ; lest the daughters of the Philistines rejoice, lest the daughters of the uncircumcised triumph.
Page 12 - Nearer, my God, to thee, Nearer to thee; E'en though it be a cross That raiseth me, Still all my song shall be, || : Nearer, my God, to thee,:|| Nearer to thee.
Page 196 - That the United States hereby disclaims any disposition or intention to exercise sovereignty, jurisdiction, or control over said island except for the pacification thereof, and asserts its determination when that is accomplished to leave the government and control of the island to its people.
Page 196 - Whereas, the abhorrent conditions which have existed for more than three years in the Island of Cuba, so near our own borders, have shocked the moral sense of the people of the United States...
Page 99 - Sleep sweetly, tender heart, in peace : Sleep, holy spirit, blessed soul, While the stars burn, the moons increase, And the great ages onward roll. Sleep till the end, true soul and sweet. Nothing comes to thee new or strange. Sleep full of rest from head to feet ; Lie still, dry dust, secure of change.
Page 47 - She openeth her mouth with wisdom ; And in her tongue is the law of kindness.
Page 226 - That it will levy no higher harbor dues on vessels of another nationality frequenting any port in such " sphere " than shall be levied on vessels of its own nationality, and no higher railroad charges over lines built, controlled, or operated within its
Page 196 - First— That the people of the island of Cuba are, and of right ought to be, free and independent. Second— That it is the duty of the United States to demand, and the government of the United States does hereby demand, that the Government of Spain at once relinquish its authority and government in the island of Cuba, and withdraw its land and naval forces from Cuba and Cuban...

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