A Report on the Insects of Massachusetts: Injurious to Vegetation, Volume 3

Front Cover
Folsom, Wells, and Thurston, printers to the University, 1841 - 459 pages

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 176 - Printing-House, between the hours of ten in the morning and two in the afternoon, to preach eight Divinity Lecture Sermons, the year following, at St.
Page 63 - Would it be believed that the larvae of an insect, or fly, no larger than a grain of rice, should silently, and in one season, destroy some thousand acres of pine trees, many of them from two to three feet in diameter, and a hundred and fifty feet high...
Page 90 - Notwithstanding the pains that have been taken by some persons to destroy and exterminate these pernicious borers, they continue to reappear in our orchards and nurseries every season. The reasons of this are to be found in the habits of the insects, and in individual carelessness. Many orchards suffer deplorably from the want of proper attention ; the trees are permitted to remain, year after year, without any pains being taken to destroy the numerous and various insects that infest them ; old orchards,...
Page 258 - The wings are roofed when at rest; the antennae are long, with a double, narrow, feathery edging, in the males, and a double row of short, slender teeth on the under side, in the females; the feelers are longer than in the other Arctians, and not at all hairy; and the tongue is short, but spirally curled.
Page 390 - An old elm-tree in this vicinity used to be a favorite place of resort for the Tremex Columba, or pigeon Tremex; and around it great numbers of the insects were often collected, during the months of July and August, and the early part of September. Six or more females might frequently be seen at once upon it, employed in boring into the trunk and laying their eggs, while swarms of the males hovered around them. For fifteen years or more, some large button-wood trees, in Cambridge, have been visited...
Page 234 - ... of the tree, from injury. Remove the earth around the base of the tree, crush and destroy the cocoons and borers which may be found in it, and under the bark, cover the wounded parts with the common clay composition, and surround the trunk with a strip of sheathing-paper eight or nine inches wide, which should extend two inches below the level of the soil, and be secured with strings of matting above. Fresh mortar should then be placed around the root, so as to confine the paper and prevent access...
Page 167 - It is to be observed, that the spring before this sickness, there was a numerous company of flies, which were like for bigness unto wasps or bumblebees ; they came out of little holes in the ground, and did eat up the green things, and made such a constant yelling noise as made the woods ring of them, and ready to deafen the hearers...
Page 87 - July, soon become pupae, and are changed to beetles and leave the trees early in September. Thus the existence of this species is limited to one year. Whitewashing, and covering the trunks of the trees with grafting composition, may prevent the female from depositing her eggs upon them ; but this practice cannot be carried to any great extent in plantations or large nurseries of the trees.
Page 127 - ... two or three distinct notes almost exactly resembling articulated sounds, and corresponding with the number of times that the wing-covers are opened and shut ; and the notes are repeated at intervals of a few minutes, for hours together. The mechanism of the taborets, and the concavity of the wing-covers, reverberate and increase the sound to such a degree, that it may be heard in the stillness of the night, at the distance of a quarter of a mile. At the approach of twilight the katy-did mounts...
Page 262 - The females are of a lighter gray color than the males, their bodies are very thick, and of an oblong oval shape, and, though seemingly wingless, upon close examination two little scales, or stinted winglets, can be discovered on each shoulder. These females lay their eggs upon the top of their cocoons, and cover them with a large quantity of frothy matter, which, on drying, becomes white and brittle. Different broods of these insects appear at various times in the course of the summer, but the greater...

Bibliographic information