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BY MINNIE 8. DAVIS.

But promise to remember me,

THE ALIENATED BROTHERS.
And, when twelve moons have passed away,
To come, with yon flag floating free,
And anchor in this rolling bay.

Two boys sat in a darkened room by
For I a precious freight will bring

the couch of their dying mother. TearOf costliest furs the forests yield,

fully and in silent awe they gazed upon With scalp-locks at your feet to fling

her pale, wan features, whose spiritual To tell the gratitude I feel.

beauty exceeded the faded loveliness of His heart had found a language ! Slow

health. For many months the mother's But with a stately step and grand,

strength had been decaying ; slowly but He turned from his deliverer now

surely, her life-barque had been drifting And for the last time sought the strand.

towards the unseen ocean of eternity, and With swelling heart and vision strained

now she was about to launch away from The gallant chieftain gazing stood,

earth, She had suffered much, and it Until the noble savage gained

seemed a blessed thing to lay aside her The shelter of his native wood.

weariness and pain for the rest of heaven. Then, turning to his waiting crew,

And yet her departing spirit, while longThe loud and prompt command he gave, ing for release from mortal thrall, turned And o'er the Northern deep they flew

back to earth with unutterable yearnings To sail along a sunnier wave.

over her weeping children, and for their But wheresoe'er, on ship or shore,

sake she would willingly have taken up Life's Battle he thereafter fought,

the burden of life again. This lesson in his heart he bore,

“My children, O, my children," she Till he its fullest meaning caught.

murmured, and her soul went up in There lives no human heart so dark

thrilling, though voiceless petition for Or foul with ignorance or shame,

them. Then with the heaven-given But somewhere hides a sacred spark

strength of prayer she calmly bade them That may be kindled to a flame.

farewell. * Good bye, my dear, dear

children, we shall meet in heaven. JoA spark of God! and who shall dare To say it may be lost or die,

seph, Charlie, love each other always; Tho'sin's black mountains on it bear

without father, or mother, or sister, you And ages after ages lie !

have only each other, and remember a

brother's love is a very precious thing. The ages have no date so vast That spark cannot their bounds o'erreach,

Let nothing ever

come between your Nor sin à fetter that at last

hearts, but love each other always !" It cannot melt from all and each.

"O, mother, we will, we will !” they For 'twas the breath of God that first

cried, and in the utter abandonment of Breathed in the soul and left it there, grief they clasped each other's hands, and Where it at last to life shall burst

knelt by the bedside. Till each and all His being share !

The mother smiled, O, so sweetly! and in that moment the spirit parted from the

worn body, and the smile still lingered GRUMBLERS.--If

you
find a man dis-

upon her gentle features, as it were to
posed to complain of the coldness of the comfort the hearts of her children.
world, be sure you will find that he has

The orphan boys were not friendless; never brought anything into the world to a wealthy uncle, who had no children, warm it, but is a personal lump of ice set took them home and educated them as his in the midst of it. If you find a man who own. They were noble looking, intellicomplains that the world is all base and gent youths, and they fulfilled the last hollow, tap him and he will probably injunction of their mother, for never were sound base and hollow. And so, in the two fonder, kinder brothers. other way, a kind man will probably find

Mr. Raymond, the uncle, was an amkindness all about him. The merciful bitious, scheming, worldly man, and all man, as

a general thing, will obtain his influence over the brothers, who were mercy.

naturally aspiring in disposition, was to

!"

upon me

create in them an ardent desire for wealth, Joseph rose to his feet with a haughty supremacy, and fame. But their sympa- gesture. Charles, it is all settled now; thies and interests were united, and the property is entirely yours; I claim through the years of study preparatory to nothing, and I will accept nothing! And entering active life, no word or act chilled 0, Charles, the loss of the money is, after the warm current of brotherly love. all, a little thing ; I have tried my broth

Mr. Raymond often declared his inten- er's heart, and found it wanting!” Tears tion of making one of the brothers his stood in his eyes, and his lips trembled heir. The one that pleased him most and with emotion. obeyed him in all things, should receive Joseph, you are very

hard his entire property

exclaimed Charles, pale with agitation. The brothers did not wish him to choose “I do not mean to be hard upon you, one in preference to the other, and en- and I hope, I pray, that the suspicion treated him to divide equally what he had which rises in my mind is false.” to give them. But Mr. Raymond was “Suspicion ! what do you mean?” and obstinate on that point ; he was unwilling Charles stood erect and stern by his brothto divide his beautiful estate. In talking er's side. this matter over, Joseph and Charles “Uncle Raymond told me more than always agreed that the heir should divide once that he intended to make his will in with his brother; and both were sincere my favor, and I believe he would have in the determination, but when the daz- done so had I been at home during his zling temptation came it was too great to sickness. You were with him then ; what be resisted.

influence you may have used to my prejuMr. Raymond died suddenly. Joseph dice and your favor, I cannot say. was absent at the time, and Charles “I understand you !" cried Charles, received his last words. When the will hoarse with passion, " say no more, else I was opened, Charles was discovered to be forget you are my brother!” the heir, and was recommended by his * You will need to forget that to be uncle to give five or six thousand dollars happy! Good-bye, sir, I leave you to to Joseph.

your possessions. Charles was really surprised, and sat Charles would have called him back; silent with astonishment and delight, he would have denied his cruel insinuawhile Joseph waited with a palpitating tion ; he would have insisted upon giving heart, expecting to hear his brother gen- him a share of the property ; but before erously declare that he should share it all he could control his anger sufficiently to with him.

do so, Joseph was beyond hearing. At length Charles found words. “This

Then the young man wept. He walkis very unexpected, for I thought you ed the floor wringing his hands, for a were the favorite. Uncle suggests that fierce contest raged within his bosom. I give you five thousand dollars—it is too His heart cried out for his brother, his small a sum, I shall make it ten thou- | dear and only brother, and love and duty sand.”

said, divide with him, as you would Joseph's eyes flashed proudly. “No, have had him 'done with you.' But on Charles Raymond,” he cried, “I will not the other hand, the glittering, golden accept as a donation from you what is tempter charmed him. How insignificant justly my right! I am the oldest ; I was the half of his fortune seemed; when always the favorite ; I fully expected to entire it just filled the measure of his ambe the heir, and if it had been so, O, how bition ! and it was his own, legally his willingly would I have shared everything own! Many and plausible arguments were with you!”

arrayed on this side, and, rising up to “I know we both promised to do so, strengthen them, were the bitter feelings and perhaps I ought, but should we not awakened by Joseph's unjust suspicion. consult our uncle's wishes ? let me have

All day and night the conflict contintime to consider

ued. He could not sleep, for in feverish

upon it.”

BY MINNIE S. DAVIS.

But promise to remember me,

THE ALIENATED BROTHERS.
And, when twelve moons have passed away,
To come, with yon flag floating free,
And anchor in this rolling bay.

Two boys sat in a darkened room by For I a precious freight will bring

the couch of their dying mother. TearOf costliest furs the forests yield,

fully and in silent awe they gazed upon With scalp-locks at your feet to fling

her pale, wan features, whose spiritual To tell the gratitude I feel.

beauty exceeded the faded loveliness of His heart had found a language! Slow

health. For many months the mother's But with a stately step and grand,

strength had been decaying ; slowly but He turned from his deliverer now

surely, her life-barque had been drifting And for the last time sought the strand.

towards the unseen ocean of eternity, and With swelling heart and vision strained

now she was about to launch away from The gallant chieftain gazing stood,

earth, She had suffered much, and it Until the noble savage gained

seemed a blessed thing to lay aside her The shelter of his native wood.

weariness and pain for the rest of heaven. Then, turning to his waiting crew,

And yet her departing spirit, while longThe loud and prompt command he gave, ing for release from mortal thrall, turned And o'er the Northern deep they flew

back to earth with unutterable yearnings To sail along a sunnier wave.

over her weeping children, and for their But wheresoe'er, on ship or shore,

sake she would willingly have taken up Life's Battle he thereafter fought,

the burden of life again. This lesson in his heart he bore,

“My children, O, my children," she Till he its fullest meaning caught.

murmured, and her soul went up in There lives no human heart so dark

thrilling, though voiceless petition for Or foul with ignorance or shame,

them. Then with the heaven-given But somewhere hides a sacred spark

strength of prayer she calmly bade them That may be kindled to a flame.

farewell. * Good bye, my dear, dear A spark of God! and who shall dare

children, we shall meet in heaven. To say it may be lost or die,

seph, Charlie, love each other always; Tho'sin's black mountains on it bear

without father, or mother, or sister, you And ages after ages lie !

have only each other, and remember a

brother's love is a very precious thing. The ages have no date so vast That spark cannot their bounds o'erreach,

Let nothing ever

come between your Nor sin a fetter that at last

hearts, but love each other always !” It cannot melt from all and each.

0, mother, we will, we will !” they For 'twas the breath of God that first

cried, and in the utter abandonment of Breathed in the soul and left it there, grief they clasped each other's hands, and Where it at last to life shall burst

knelt by the bedside. Till each and all His being share !

The mother smiled, O, so sweetly! and in that moment the spirit parted from the

worn body, and the smile still lingered GRUMBLERS.—If you find a man dis- upon her gentle features, as it were to posed to complain of the coldness of the comfort the hearts of her children. world, be sure you will find that he has

The orphan boys were not friendless ; never brought anything into the world to a wealthy uncle, who had no children, warm it, but is a personal lump of ice set took them home and educated them as his in the midst of it. If you find a man who own. They were noble looking, intellicomplains that the world is all base and gent youtńs, and they fulfilled the last hollow, tap him and he will probably injunction of their mother, for never were sound base and hollow. And so, in the two fonder, kinder brothers. other way, a kind man will probably find

Mr. Raymond, the uncle, was an amkindness all about him. The merciful bitious, scheming, worldly man, and all man, as

a general thing, will obtain his influence over the brothers, who were mercy.

naturally aspiring in disposition, was to

Jo

66

create in them an ardent desire for wealth, Joseph rose to his feet with a haughty supremacy, and fame. But their sympa- gesture. Charles, it is all settled now; thies and interests were united, and the property is entirely yours ;

I claim through the years of study preparatory to nothing, and I will accept nothing! And entering active life, no word or act chilled 0, Charles, the loss of the money is, after the warm current of brotherly love. all, a little thing ; I have tried my broth

Mr. Raymond often declared his inten- er's heart, and found it wanting !" Tears tion of making one of the brothers his stood in his eyes, and his lips trembled beir. The one that pleased him most and with emotion. obeyed him in all things, should receive • Joseph, you are very hard upon me !" his entire property.

exclaimed Charles, pale with agitation. The brothers did not wish him to choose “I do not mean to be hard upon you, one in preference to the other, and en- and I hope, I pray, that the suspicion treated him to divide equally what he had which rises in my mind is false.” to give them. But Mr. Raymond was “Suspicion ! what do you mean?” and obstinate on that point; he was unwilling Charles stood erect and stern by his brothto divide his beautiful estate. In talking er's side. this matter over, Joseph and Charles “ Uncle Raymond told me more than always agreed that the heir should divide once that he intended to make his will in with his brother; and both were sincere my favor, and I believe he would have in the determination, but when the daz- done so had I been at home during his zling temptation came it was too great to sickness. You were with him then ; what be resisted.

influence you may have used to my prejuMr. Raymond died suddenly. Joseph dice and your favor, I cannot say. was absent at the time, and Charles “I understand you !” cried Charles, received his last words. When the will hoarse with passion, " say no more, else I was opened, Charles was discovered to be forget you are my brother!” the heir, and was recommended by his * You will need to forget that to be uncle to give five or six thousand dollars happy! Good-bye, sir, I leave you to to Joseph.

your possessions. Charles was really surprised, and sat Charles would have called him back; silent with astonishment and delight, he would have denied his cruel insinuawhile Joseph waited with a palpitating tion; he would have insisted upon giving heart, expeeting to hear his brother gen- him a share of the property ; but before erously declare that he should share it all he could control his anger sufficiently to with him.

do so, Joseph was beyond hearing. At length Charles found words. “This

Then the young man wept. He walkis very unexpected, for I thought you ed the floor wringing his hands, for a were the favorite. Uncle suggests that fierce contest raged within his bosom. I give you five thousand dollars—it is too His heart cried out for his brother, his

I shall make it ten thou- | dear and only brother, and love and duty sand.”

divide with him, as you would Joseph's eyes flashed proudly. “No, have had him done with you.' But on Charles Rayinond,” he cried, "I will not the other hand, the glittering, golden accept as a donation from you what is tempter charmed him. How insignificant justly my right! I am the oldest ; I was the half of his fortune seemed ; when always the favorite ; I fully expected to entire it just filled the measure of his ambe the heir, and if it had been so, O, how bition ! and it was his own, legally his willingly would I have shared everything own! Many and plausible arguments were with you!"

arrayed on this side, and, rising up to "I know we both promised to do so, strengthen them, were the bitter feelings and perhaps I ought, but should we not awakened by Joseph's unjust suspicion. consult our uncle's wishes ? let me have

All day and night the conflict contintime to consider upon it.”

ued. He could not sleep, for in feverish

small a sum,

said,

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