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dreams, he saw the pale, sad face of his chased a fine house, and it chanced to be mother, and heard her entreatingly say, upon the same broad avenue where stood be true to your brother!"

the costly, imposing mansion of his But when the morning dawned, the brother. angel departed, for the tempter had con- They daily passed each other in the quered! Charles determined to retain street, knowing one another, yet as stranthe possession of his legal rights, and gers; and their children met at school to urge upon Joseph the acceptance of ten unconscious of the tie of relationship bethousand dollars. Joseph scorned the tween them. gift and no entreaties could induce him to One morning in passing to his place of receive it, for he had a firm conviction business, Charles Raymond met his son, that Charles had influenced their uncle in a lad of sixteen, walking arm in arm with the disposition of the property.

a youth of the same age.

His brow darkThus the brothers parted. Mammon ened at the sight. He knew the youth divided the hearts which should have whose noble features, clustering brown loved each other always.

hair, and clear penetrating eyes, were so Both of these brothers possessed fine like Joseph's in the happy days of boytalents, and were fitted by nature for pub- hood. The boys were chatting merrily,

A few years passed away, and and with affectionate, confiding glances. they found themselves political opponents; “ Wallace, there is my father,” candidates for the same office. Party claimed Francis, “ let me introduce you spirit raged high, and the strife was bitter to him! Father, this is my friend, Waland unmanly. In the struggle, the last lace Raymond, he is my class-mate." spark of brotherly love seemed to die out “ Good morning, sir,” said Mr. Rayin the heart of each, and cruel, bitter mond, coldly, and with a slight inclinataunts were flung back and forth in the tion of his head he passed quickly on his heat of contest, which could not be easily way. forgiven.

Francis looked after him with a flush of Charles was defeated, and he retired to mortification. “ He must be in a hurry private life in disgust. He turned every this morning," he said, apologetically, energy of his mind to the accumulation of “ but never mind, he will have a chance wealth, and as time passed, his fortune to get acquainted with you to-night, when assumed colossal proportions.

you come to tea.” Joseph was a lawyer; he became emi- “This must not be !" said Mr. Raynent, and occupied important public mond to himself with set teeth, " this offices with honor and fidelity. His in- must not be ! my son must not walk arm tegrity and brilliant powers of mind made in arm with Joseph Raymond's sonhim at once a useful and popular man. friends, indeed !” and with a cold sneer Charles, at a distance, watched his pro- upon his lip he turned into his counting gress, and when he saw the wreath of house. laurel resting upon his head, he smiled Wallace and Francis had been schoolsadly, and said, Fame for him, and companions but a few months, and yet wealth for me!

they were ardent friends. They studied Each brother had a happy home, a the same books, enjoyed the same sports, loving wife and beautiful children. And and shared their very thoughts with each though they had disobeyed their sainted other. Some who have outgrown or formother's last wish, they cherished her gotten the warm, beautiful impulses of name and memory, for in each home was youth, and those whose hearts beat coldly a little girl, with hazel eyes and golden and measured, may smile incredulously hair, answering to the sweet, simple, when I speak of the strength and dishallowed name of Mary.

interestedness of early friendships. True, In the course of time it became expedi- these friendships are sometimes evanescent, ent for Joseph Raymond to move to the yet pure and precious while they last, but city where Charles resided. He pur- many times they grow stronger and brighter, through the eventful lapse of "Mary Raymond." years, until old age.

He was sure of it before ; his brother's Youth is the time to form the purest Mary, all beauty and joy, and his own friendships, for then the heart is fresh, Mary lying in the grave! Must he meet and the sweet spring of hope is bubbling that brother or his children everywhere? to its very brim; then the soul is not He pressed his hands over his eyes to warped by selfish interests, and faith, and crush the bitter, bitter tears that filled, confidence, and joy, is the very air it them. breathes. But in maturer years, when Mrs. Raymond came into the room the world looks dimmer through tearful with such a smile as she had not worn

for eyes; when sorrow bas tamed the bound- many days. “Mr. Raymond, have you ing pulse, and the dust of toil seems to noticed my little visitor ?' and she led rest even upon the radiant face of Nature; the child to his side. " See how much then very true to its native instincts, very she looks like our precious Mary, and her loyal to its God, must be the heart that name is Mary, too!" can form a friendship as ardent, as un- Mr. Raymond could not help it, the selfish, as it might have known in youth. impulse would not be resisted; he took

At night when Mr. Charles Raymond the child in his arms, pressed her to his passed over the threshold of his dwelling, bosom, whispering softly, Mary, little a sense of pain and depression, rested like Mary!a . cloud upon his spirits. This cloud "She is Hon. Joseph Raymond's always enveloped him now as he entered daughter,” said the lady, " I expect her the door, for only a few weeks previously brother to come to tea with Francis.” the Death angel had taken the little Mary, Mr. Raymond shook his head with who was the sunlight of that home. She contracting brows; he put the child from was the idol of both parents, and for a him, and the upspringing waters of tenseason they were utterly heart-broken. derness were sent back chilled and poisTime, however, had blunted the sharp oned to their fountain. edge of their sorrow, and the father forgot At that moment Francis and Wallace it in the busy whirl of traffic, but the appeared, full of mirth and high spirits. mother's voice was still plaintive in its Mrs. Raymond enjoyed the company of tone, and her smiles were touched by sad- her young guests, and exerted herself to ness.

make their visit pleasant, but Mr. RayMr. Raymond entered his splendid par- mond's sullen silence cast a gloom over lor with a listless, melancholy air. The the little party. When they were alone, only occupant of the room was a little he said, "Sarah, do you know who this girl seated upon an ottoman, who was Hon. Joseph Raymond is ?”. examining a collection of toys and picture She hesitated and trembled a little, as books. He recognized the playthings she answered, “yes." with a start of pain—they had belonged to “ Then was it well, was it kind, to his lost Mary, and the child seated there, invite his children to my house ? do you was like, so very like his own! the blood do right to encourage any intimacy berushed back upon his heart, and faint tween his son and ours ?”. from the sudden shock, he sank upon

the Mrs. Raymond's eyes filled with tears. nearest chair.

I first saw them in the street; Wallace The child looked up with a smile of was leading little Mary; I heard him call innocent joy. She was lovely, with fair her by name, and she so strongly resem: curls, beaming eyes, and pearled lips and bled our own darling that I could not cheeks. She spoke, and her words thrill help speaking to her. Then I was so ed the stern man's heart strangely. lonely, my heart ached so, and it com“ The kind lady bere, has lent me the forted me to see her!” pretty things her little Mary used to play “Poor, dear Sarah, no wonder at that!

but then when you learned who she was “What is your name, sissy ?"

you should have conquered those feelings,

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and you ought to have warned Francis That man is my own and' only against making Wallace his companion." brother!"

I did not wish to do that ; Wallace “ Is it possible ? I knew you had a has been here frequently, and I have brother, and that you parted from him in closely studied his character. He is a anger, but I never dreamed this Charles noble, manly fellow, just such a friend as Raymond was the one. Have you spoken our thoughtless Francis needs."

to him ? do you ever meet each other ?” Well, be that as it may, I am dis- “We daily pass each other in the pleased at their intimacy, and it must not street, but we have never spoken. I long be continued.”

to say, 'Charles forgive me, and be for“But they are such warm friends, given, but he looks so cold and proud, I pleaded the lady,“ it would be cruel to dare not. I am proud, too, and though I forbid their associating; their friendship would be reconciled to him, I could not is really very strong and tender.

bear to be repulsed.” “ Humph! don't talk to me about the “O, this is dreadful, Joseph ! does it friendship of school boys! I'm sure, Mrs not make you wretched ?" Raymond, I hope you won't oppose me “ Yes, my dear wife, it does. I rein this. Tell Francis my wishes, for member when our mother was dying, we they must be obeyed, even if it should be knelt by her bed, and she made us promnecessary to explain the reason to him.” ise to love each other always. I often

“ Think, my husband, what a lesson fancy she is looking down from heaven, for a mother to give her son! 'Francis, reproachfully and sadly, upon her chilyou must avoid Wallace Raymond ; hate dren. I wonder if Charles ever thinks of him if you can, for he is the son of your that. Poor fellow, he looks troubled and father's only brother.'

care-worn, and he used to be such a “Sarah, why will you put it in that happy, gentle, loving boy! Of late I light ?" said Mr. Raymond uneasily, and have thought that I was too hard upon with a touch of anger in his tones. him in our first quarrel. If I had been

Joseph was my brother, but I do not tempted by that fortune as he was, it is recognize him as such now.

possible I might have done the same. “My dear husband, does not this long, And then in that political struggle, I was unnatural alienation weigh heavy on your as selfish, as unjust, as unbrotherly, as conscience ? forgive and forget ; be recon- he. O, how I wish I could live it all ciled to your brother!”.

over again !" Never, Sarah, that can never be ! “ Will you not go to him and tell him I would not harm a hair of his head, but so ? then he will remember his wrongs to we can never be brothers again.”

you, and you will both forgive, and the Mrs. Raymond sighed, and gathering thought of your angel mother will give up the picture books and toys, sacred you joy instead of pain.” mementoes of the loved and lost Mary, “I wish I could, I wish I could !" she retired from the room.

“ You wish you could—then why not That night Mr. Joseph Raymond do it?" missed his children at the tea-table. My dear, I don't suppose you know " Where are Wallace and Mary ?” he anything about this hateful, obstinate asked of his wife.

pride ; it is that which hinders me!” “Francis Raymond, Wallace's friend, "Joseph, I am going to call upon Mrs. invited them to tea, with his mother's Charles Raymond to-morrow, and take permission. · Mary has been there several little Mary with me. times, and Mrs. Raymond makes a great comforts her sad heart to see the dardeal of her, for she had a little Mary once ling.” who died."

"Well, what then?What, are the children visiting at

o Without doubt we shall be fast the house of Charles Raymond !"

friends; the children shall visit back and · Yes."

forth just as often as they please, and

Wallace says it

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then how can the husband and father Quite a sad accident happened just help finding out that they are brothers ?”' now,” said one.

Mrs. Raymond looked very beautiful in “ How, and what was it ?” her half tearful, half smiling earnestness, “A horse got frightened, and ran, and at least, so her husband thought, and knocked a boy down in the street; the though he shook his head at her sugges- poor

fellow was taken up

for dead.” tions, he kissed her in a very lover-like “How old a boy, should you think ?" way.

“ About fourteen or fifteen; he was a True to her word, Mrs. Joseph called fine looking fellow, with beautiful, curly, upon Mrs. Charles, and thus commenced brown hair." a friendly acquaintance. Francis and The Raymonds listened with breathless Wallace were constantly together, and attention ; an awful presentiment thrilled little Mary's society became very precious them, and they looked into each other's to the bereaved mother. Thus the fami- eyes tremblingly, and with whitened lips. lies were placed upon the most familiar “Do you know who he was ?. and friendly footing, but the brothers “I heard some one say that his name remained unchanged. Sometimes their was Raymond, and that he lived in Sixth garments brushed each other in the jost-Avenue.” ling crowd, and yet a gulf divided them. A smothered cry of anguish rose to JoThey looked into each others faces, not as seph's lips and he started to his feet, but strangers, for the studied coldness of their Charles sank back dizzy and almost stunglances was very unlike the careless in- ned. difference of those who know nothing of “ Charles, O, Charles, it is your boy each other. Outwardly they were un

or mine!" changed, . but He who sees the inmost “ Yes, I felt it from the first ; which, heart looked with pitying eye upon their 0, which is it ?” and Charles Raymond troubled spirits. Wealth and Fame; rose from his seat, as if trembling with home and friends, earth's highest prizes palsy. were theirs, and yet they were wretched, “Charles, one moment ! let me clasp for the burden of unacknowledged, un- your hand ! your home or mine is desoforgiven sin, grew heavier and heavier. late ; then let us, in this solemn moment, Each yearned for the sweet peace of recon- forgive and be forgiven.” ciliation, and carefully watched for the * Willingly, brother; willingly! we least sign of concession from the other, have been very wicked in our pride and yet both were too proud, too obstinate to stubbornness, and now God's heavy take that first important step.

stroke has made us humble."

They grasped each other's hands, and One day, being wearied with a long tears stood in the eyes of both. They walk, Mr. Joseph Raymond entered an stepped out upon the pavement as they omnibus which ran in the direction of his saw a mutual acquaintance advancing with home. The vehicle was crowded and a serious aspect. It was the messenger of with some difficulty he obtained a seat, mournful tidings- which, O, which, was when, to his extreme annoyance, he beheld to be called upon to weep ?his brother sitting directly opposite." Mr. Joseph Raymond, I have sad Both felt painfully embarrassed, yet no news for you. trace of feeling was visible upon the stern, I know it I know it — my boy is composed face of either.

dead!” What a heart wail was in his tones! At one of the crossings they were Charles felt the tears gushing from his hindered by a crowd, and the driver eyes he had not wept thus since his reined in his horses, and quietly waited childhood. It was not a time for words, for å passage to be made. Two men and they hastened on in silence. Walstood talking upon the side-walk so near lace lay upon his couch as if indeed dead, that their conversation could be distinctly and his mother and sister hung over him heard.

in transports of grief and terror.

and you ought to have warned Francis “ That man is my own and only against making Wallace his companion.” brother!”

I did not wish to do that ; Wallace “ Is it possible ? I knew you had a has been here frequently, and I have brother, and that you parted from him in closely studied his character. He is a anger, but I never dreamed this Charles noble, manly fellow, just such a friend as Raymond was the one. Have you spoken our thoughtless Francis needs."

to him ? do you ever meet each other ?” • Well, be that as it

may,
I am dis-

“We daily pass each other in the pleased at their intimacy, and it must not street, but we have never spoken. I long be continued.”

to say, Charles forgive me, and be for“But they are such warm friends, given,' but he looks so cold and proud, I pleaded the lady, “it would be cruel to dare not. I am proud, too, and though I forbid their associating; their friendship would be reconciled to him, I could not is really very strong and tender.”'

bear to be repulsed. Humph! don't talk to me about the “O, this is dreadful, Joseph ! does it friendship of school boys! I'm sure, Mrs not make you wretched ?" Raymond, I hope you won't oppose me “Yes, my dear wife, it does. I rein this. Tell Francis my wishes, for member when our mother was dying, we they must be obeyed, even if it should be knelt by her bed, and she made us promnecessary to explain the reason to him.” ise to love each other always. I often

" Think, my husband, what a lesson fancy she is looking down from heaven, for a mother to give her son ! • Francis, reproachfully and sadly, upon her chilyou must avoid Wallace Raymond ; hate dren. I wonder if Charles ever thinks of him if you can, for he is the son of your that. Poor fellow, he looks troubled and father's only brother.''

care-worn, and he used to be such a “Sarah, why will you put it in that happy, gentle, loving boy! Of late I light ?" said Mr. Raymond uneasily, and have thought that I was too hard upon with a touch of anger in his tones. him in our first quarrel. If I had been “ Joseph was my brother, but I do not tempted by that fortune as he was, it is recognize him as such now.”

possible I might have done the same. “My dear husband, does not this long, And then in that political struggle, I was unnatural alienation weigh heavy on your as selfish, as unjust, as unbrotherly, as conscience ? forgive and forget; be recon- he. O, how I wish I could live it all ciled to

your
brother !"

over again!” • Never, Sarah, that can never be ! “Will you not go to him and tell him I would not harm a hair of his head, but so ? then he will remember his wrongs to we can never be brothers again.”

you, and you will both forgive, and the Mrs. Raymond sighed, and gathering thought of your angel mother will give up the picture books and toys, sacred you joy instead of pain.”. mementoes of the loved and lost Mary, “I wish I could, I wish I could !" she retired from the room.

“ You wish you could—then why not That night Mr. Joseph Raymond do it?" missed his children at the tea-table. “My dear, I don't suppose you know “Where are Wallace and Mary ?” he anything about this hateful, obstinate asked of his wife.

príde ; it is that which hinders me!" “ Francis Raymond, Wallace's friend, "Joseph, I am going to call upon Mrs. invited them to tea, with his mother's Charles Raymond to-morrow, and take permission. Mary has been there several little Mary with me. Wallace

says it times, and Mrs. Raymond makes a great comforts her sad heart to see the dardeal of her, for she had a little Mary once ling. who died.”

« Well, what then ?What, are the children visiting at

6. Without doubt

be fast the house of Charles Raymond !"

friends ; the children shall visit back and “ Yes."

forth just as often as they please, and

we shall

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