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London as an able defender of things seemed to take. Mr. Bogue, evangelical truth, when Arianism however, never formed any political threatened the dissenting churches connexion with the liberals of his of the metropolis with a deadly pes- day, but contented himself with looktilence. In the wife of his choice ing on as a Christian philanthropist. the departed was blessed with a help- The excitement given to the human meet for him ; for Mrs. Bogue was a mind at this time led to many subsewoman of cultivated mind, elegant quent improvements in the world. manners, benevolent spirit, and emi- In the case of our deceased friend, nent religion.

there is reason to conclude that his Soon after Mr. Bogue's marriage, powerful mind, being directed to foGeorge Welch, Esq. a Banker of Lon- reign objects, was induced to muse don, looking round upon the dark over the more practicable and cerplaces of our land, wisely deter- tain method of benefiting mankind mined to plant in them seminaries by the universal diffusion of the

gosfor the ministry; that by the labours pel. Of this the writer of these lines of the students the surrounding coun- is sure, that when some great retry might be cultivated, and provi- verses in the political world had dission might be made for a suitable appointed the philanthropist, Mr. supply, when death should render Bogue comforted himself and his the churches vacant. One of these friends by saying, “Well, we see that small academies he established at the only way of benefiting mankind Gosport, under the care of Mr. Bogue, is by making them Christians.” whom he esteemed as worthy to di- When, on a visit at the Tabernacle rect the studies and form the man- at Bristol, our friend met with other ners of the rising ministry.--The ministers like minded, he formed, course of study was comprised with with them, the outline of the Misin three years. The first class of sionary Society, which was afterstudents consisted of four, and Mr. wards more formally organised in Bogue being the sole tutor, instructed London. He preached one of the them in Latin, Greek, and Hebrew, sermons at the first public meeting, and his manner of lecturing on theo- and undertook to answer the objeclogy and other branches was highly tions, having chosen for his text, creditable to his knowledge, and “ Thus speaketh the Lord of hosty, wisdom, and zeal.

saying, This people say, the time is While the first set of students were not come, the time that the Lord's pursuing their studies, the active mind house should be built. Then came and benevolent spirit of Dr. Bogue the word of the Lord by Haggai the were called into most vigorous exer- prophet, saying, Is it time for you, cise. For the French revolution ex- 0 ye, to dwell in your ceiled houses, cited universal attention, and roused and this house lie waste ? Now, the finest spirits of the age to medi- therefore, thus saith the Lord of tate new schemes of improvement, hosts ; Consider your ways.”---Hagand to indulge more exalted hopes of gai i. 2-5. the advancement of the world in From this time, he devoted bimknowledge, liberty, and happiness. self most ardently to the cause of misIn proportion to the benevolent ar- sions. Night and day he meditated dour with which he entered into and laboured to excite the attention these views, our friend was slow to and call forth the contributions of abandon them even when the course the Christian church that the gospel of events in France, and the tide of might be preached to the whole heaopinion at home, turned directly op- then world. When his views were posite to the course which at first not acted upon he went steadily for

The judge replied, « Certainly ;

our departed friend was a most afif they keep to their proper busi- fectionate brother. He had one deness-religion, and do not inter- pendant sister, to whose support he fere with political affairs." Our contributed largely, and also gave friend, now deceased, consented to a small annuity to an old servant this condition, observing, that a mis- who lived with her at her death. sionary's business was simply reli- Far from considering, as some gion, and that he had nothing to do foolishly do, a superior education as with the politics of any country to an exemption from the necessity of which he went.

subsequent study, he applied himThe congregation at Gosport had self most indefatigably to reading been divided in consequence of the and composition. His lamp went not dissatisfaction of many of its mem- out by night. While yet unmarried bers with the services of Mr. Wat- and before the labours of the tutor were son, who afterwards shewed that he added to those of the pastor, he laid was not satisfied with his own pro- up those stores which future duties fession. Those who separated had would require, but future avocations invited Mr. English, afterwards Pas- would forbid to accumulate. His tor at Wonburn, Bucks, who was · reading was greatly in the line of ministering to them when Mr. Bogue foreign divinity and biblical literacame to Gosport, and soon gained ture, in which his library was partihis esteem. Mr. English therefore cularly rich. called his flock together, and in- While a young man, he travelled formed them, that as a pastor was on the continent of Europe for the now chosen to the church to which improvement of his mind. Having they originally belonged, in whom acquired a command of the French they might all unite, the cause of tongue, he visited the capital of their separation ceased to exist; and France, and in his future life he often Mr. English deemed it his duty to shewed the profitable use he had resign the pastoral charge over them. made of that opportunity of studying At the same time, Mr. Bogue ad- mankind. From France he went into vised his flock to write a kind letter, Holland, and visited the most remarkinviting their former brethren to re- able places in that country, which turn. They accepted the invitation; had been the asylum of religious liand thus terminated their separation, berty and the seat of sacred science. in a manner most honourable to all On his return he devoted all his the parties concerned. Christians, acquisitions to the promotion of reliand especially Ministers, see here gion in our native land. The meethow blessed are the peace-makers, ing house at Gosport was small, in

they shall be called the sons of convenient, and in a disagreeable God.”

part of the town; but the zeal and The parents of Dr. Bogue received influence of our departed friend rousgreat delight from hearing of his ex- ed the congregation to erect in a cellence and usefulness as a minister very desirable spot a respectable of Christ. When the father of our building, sixty feet by fifty, with friend died, in 1786, he continued three galleries, which was at that the same dutiful son to his mother; time the best dissenting-place in the for, while she lived, he made regular county, and it is believed that the visits to his native place, and preach- whole expence was defrayed by those ed much to her edification. She who were to worship in it. died in 1805, full of hope and joy. In the year 1788, Mr. Bogue was There is but one brother now sur- married to Miss Charlotte Uffington, viving, and his lady informs me, that whose father was well known in

for «

London as an able defender of things seemed to take. Mr. Bogue, erangelical truth, when Arianism however, never formed any political threatened the dissenting churches connexion with the liberals of his of the metropolis with a deadly pes- day, but contented himself with looktilence. In the wife of his choice ing on as a Christian philanthropist. the departed was blessed with a help- The excitement given to the human meet for him ; for Mrs. Bogue was a mind at this time led to many subsewoman of cultivated mind, elegant quent improvements in the world. manners, benevolent spirit, and emi- In the case of our deceased friend, nent religion.

there is reason to conclude that his Soon after Mr. Bogue's marriage, powerful mind, being directed to foGeorge Welch, Esq.a

Banker of Lon- reign objects, was induced to muse don, looking round upon the dark over the more practicable and cerplaces of our land, wisely deter- tain method of benefiting mankind mined to plant in them seminaries by the universal diffusion of the gosfor the ministry; that by the labours pel. Of this the writer of these lines of the students the surrounding coun- is sure, that when some great retry might be cultivated, and provi- verses in the political world had dission might be made for a suitable appointed the philanthropist, Mr. supply, when death should render Bogue comforted himself and his the churches vacant. One of these friends by saying, “Well, we see that small academies he established at the only way of benefiting mankind Gosport, under the care of Mr. Bogue, is by making them Christians." whom he esteemed as worthy to di- When, on a visit at the Tabernacle rect the studies and form the man- at Bristol, our friend met with other ners of the rising ministry. The ministers like minded, he formed, course of study was comprised with with them, the outline of the Misin three years. The first class of sionary Society, which was afterstudents consisted of four, and Mr. wards more formally organised in Bogue being the sole tutor, instructed London. He preached one of the them in Latin, Greek, and Hebrew, sermons at the first public meeting, and his manner of lecturing on theo- and undertook to answer the objeclogy and other branches was highly tions, having chosen for his text, creditable to his knowledge, and “ Thus speaketh the Lord of hosts, wisdom, and zeal.

saying, This people say, the time is While the first set of students were not come, the time that the Lord's pursuing their studies, the active mind house should be built. Then came and benevolent spirit of Dr. Bogue the word of the Lord by Haggai the were called into most vigorous exer- prophet, saying, Is it time for you, cise. For the French revolution ex- O ye, to dwell in your ceiled houses, cited universal attention, and roused and this house lie waste ? Now, the finest spirits of the age to medi- therefore, thus saith the Lord of tate new schemes of improvement, hosts ; Consider your ways.”--Hagand to indulge more exalted hopes of gai i. 2-5. the advancement of the world in From this time, he devoted Limknowledge, liberty, and happiness. self most ardently to the cause of misIn proportion to the benevolent ar- sions. Night and day he meditated dour with which he entered into and laboured to excite the attention these views, our friend was slow to and call forth the contributions of abandon them even when the course the Christian church that the gospel of events in France, and the tide of might be preached to the whole heaopinion at home, turned directly op- then world. When his views were pasite to the course which at first not acted upon he went steadily forward with the cause, and waited the child, in which all the father appeared supeffect of time and events.

ported and hallowed, by all the saint. Of

these two interesting young men, a touching After a second body of mission

memoir was drawn up by one of the surviving aries had been sent out to the South brothers, which together with the funeral Seas, the Missionary Society turned sermon just alluded to, was printed for priits attention to a college for the in

vate circulation. Mr. David Bogue, the struction of its labourers among the

author of this beautiful piece of biography,

was then the classical tutor in the academy heathen. To whom then could the

over which his revered father presided, of Directors be expected to look as a

which office he discharged the duties with Tutor, but to him who had contri- singular ability, and will ever be remembered

with delight and gratitude, by those who huted so materially to the formation of enjoyed his instruction. About a year and the Society, and who was already so half ago, Mrs. Bogue, whose constitution well known as an able teacher for the never recovered the shock it received by the perfecting of holy men for the work of death of her sons, followed them to the sethe ministry. To him, therefore, the pulchre, and left her bereaved husband to

prove by experience, that there is a woe for Missionary Seminary was entrusted. mortals, far more bitter than the loss of His freedom from all petty conceits,

children. David, who had devoted his fine his grandeur of mind, and philan- to be a bright ornament of the English bar,

talents to the legal profession, and bid fair thropy of heart, his attachment to

was destined to be the next victim. Alas! essential truths, and his forbearance he too, like a lovely flower, broken on its on minor points, all served to prove stem, just when putting forth its full blown that he was exactly the man to whom beauty and its richest fragrance, was smit

ten by the rude hand of death, and fell with a union of different communions

all his youthful honours, on the ashes of his should entrust the instruction of its 'mother and his brothers. But how did the missionaries to the heathen world. father bear this four-sold bereavement? Like Many journies he took on the bu

one that recognised in every stroke the apsiness of this Society, and in the ingly severe in his dealings, or really mys,

pointment of a God, who, however seem. year 1816 he went with his friend, terious in his schemes, is always wise, and the Rev. James Bennett, to the king- just, and good : like one who knew that his dom of the Netherlands, in the ser

own approaching dissolution, would soon re

store to him those dear friends, torn from vice of the same body. His presence him by the ruthless band of the last enemy.' every where inspired veneration and His unmarried daughter, still remained, like esteem, and his counsels and mi- a ministering angel, to comfort him in his nistry gave a profitable direction to

old age, to be the companion of bis home,

and a light in his dreary habitation."--- See the public mind. The miles he tra

James's Discourse. velled, and the sums he collected for this grand and holy cause, it would He was now about to verify the not be easy to specify.

declaration of David, “Why should

I mourn for them that are gone, they “During the latter period of his life, he was severely tried by domestic affliction, and was

shall not return to me, but I shall go thus placed in a situation, which afforded him

to them.” His ministry was strongly an opportunity of uniting the milder beauty of marked with the spirit of a man on the passive graces, with the bold energy of the threshold of heaven. He delithe active virtues. About eleven years ago, he was deprived by death of one of his sons,

vered several discourses on the emwho sunk to the tomb at the age of twenty- ployments of the blessed. On the two: about the same time, his eldest daugh- transfiguration of Christ he descanted ter, baving married a respectable minister, like one who was already in view of crossed the Atlantic, and settled in America. Three years since, the destroyer of our fa

Jesus on the mount, clothed with mily circles, entered his habitation a second glory. He was about to close the time, and laid another of his sons in the Session of the Mission Collegie, and grave. This venerable minister, then nearly to travel for the Missionary Society seventy-three years of age, equally removed from unmanly stoicism and unchristian sor

The last sabbath he preached in his row, proached a funeral sermon for his owu own pulpit was remarkable. He

shall see my

discoursed on the apostolic benedio- He set out on Tuesday, October tion—“The grace of our Lord Jesus 18, 1825, for Brighton, to attend the Christ, and the love of God, and the anniversary of the Sussex Auxiliary communion of the Holy Spirit, be Missionary Meeting. with you all, Amen." He read the

“ He arrived about dinner-time, and in farewell sermon of Paul, in the 20th of the evening offered up the prayer before the Acts, and pronounced with great em- sermon, which was preached by the Rev. phasis the words, “Sorrowing most George Clayton, at the Rev. Mr. Goulty's of all for the words which he spake, he became very ill after reaching Mr. Goul

chapel. Dr. Bogue was then in pain, and ye

face no more.” One ty's bouse. Medical advice was immediof his hearers has since told the writer ately obtained from Mr. Fletcher, a surgeon, of this article, “ I then said to myself, Mrs. G.'s brother,) who resided with the

family. But the case soon becoming very he will preach in that pulpit no more. serious, the assistance of another surgeon, au

In his journey into Warwickshire, elderly gentleman of eminence in the town, the following week, he was cheered was called in. The most prompt and suitby the previous arrival of his daugh- but with little success.

able means were employed during the night,

The patient sufferer ter, Mrs. Parker, from America, after

continued under the painful pressure of his an absence of nine years. She was disorder (ischuria), until Sunday noon, when now able to supply the place of her it was hoped that he had been effectually honoured parent near the sick bed of delusive ; for in the afternoon of the same

These hopes, however, proved the other daughter, who still lies day he became evidently worse, and the deeply afflicted. Our good friend expectation of protracting so valuable a life pursued his missionary tour without gradually vanished. In the forenoon of the serious inconvenience, though sub

next day, the painful duty devolved upon his

eldest daughter to intimate to bim the opinion ject to that complaint of which he

which the medical gentlemen entertained of died; and on his return to London his case. He received the information with he expressed to a friend, whom he his accustomed composure, and only said,

“ Well, my dear, the will of the Lord be had requested to meet him at the

done !" He then desired that the 32nd house of his son, how much satisfac- Psalm should be read to him; after which, tion his interviews with churches and directing the door to be closed, he offered up ministers of Christ had afforded. a fervent and affectionate prayer on behalf On his return to Gosport, his place each of them by name to God, with petitions

of his beloved family; distinctly commending of worship, which had been shut up adapted to the case of each. for enlargement and repairs, was not “During his painful illness he did not ready to receive him, and he offici. speak much, but what he did say was much ated in the vestry. The last sabbath whom I have believed,' &c. And, like many

to the purpose. I know,' said he, 'in was occupied, in the morning, by other dying Christians, rejoiced to reflect preaching for his valued friend, the that he had become interested in the blessRer. John Griffin, of Portsea, when ings of the gospel before the arrival of sick.

ness and death. He took also peculiar enhe preached a funeral sermon for the

couragement from that promise, of which son-in-law of that excellent minister, Mr. Goulty reminded bim, ‘I will never on the text chosen for him, “ And leave thee, nor forsake thee.'-'0,' said he, not only they, but ourselves also, His heart continued to the last fully alive to

that promise is of the highest character.' which have the first-fruits of the Spi- the great cause of missions, and he spake rit, even we ourselves

groan
withia

more than once to the Senior Secretary of ourselves, waiting for the adoption, the Society, and to others who visited him, to wit, the redemption of our body.” of the progress and prospects of the Mission

ary Society; he took peculiar pleasure in Rom. viii. 23.

observing the talents and zeal displayed by In the afternoon, at his own place, young ministers in the cause, In a letter to he discoursed of “Enoch who walked the Secretary a few weeks before, be says, with God," and in the evening, on

" We remember the difficulties and discou

ragements we met with in the early days of the remaining words, “ and he was

the Society; but how pleasing it is now to not, for God took him."

find the cause almost universally encouraged,

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