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(b) The Director of the Office of Foreign Missions shall, by regulation, establish liability insurance requirements which can reasonably be expected to afford adequate compensation to victims and which are io to be met by each mission, members of the mission and their families, and individuals described in section 19 of the Convention on Privileges and Immunities of the United Nations of February 13, 1946, relating to risks arising from the operation in the United States of any motor vehicle, vessel, or aircraft.

(c) The Director of the Office of Foreign Missions 11 shall take such steps as he may deem necessary to insure that each mission

, members of the mission and their families, and individuals de scribed in section 19 of the Convention on Privileges and Immunities of the United Nations of February 13, 1946, who operate motor vehicles, vessels, or aircraft in the United States comply with the requirements established pursuant to subsection (b).

SEC. 7. (a) That chapter 85 of title 28, United States Code, is amended by the addition of the following new section; “8 1364. Direct actions against insurers of members of diplomatic

missions and their families "(a) The district courts shall have original and exclusive jurisdic tion, without regard to the amount in controversy, of any civil action commenced by any person against an insurer who by contract has insured an individual, who is a member of a mission within the meaning of section 2(3) of the Diplomatic Relations Act (22 U.S.C. 254a(3) 12 or a member of the family of such a member of a mission, or an individual described in section 19 of the Convention on Privileges and Immunities of the United Nations of February 13, 1946, against liability for personal injury, death, or damage to property.

*(b) Any direct action brought against an insurer under subsection (a) shall be tried without a jury, but shall not be subject to the defense that the insured is immune from suit, that the insured is an indispensable party, or in the absence of fraud or collusion, that the insured has violated a term of the contract, unless the contract was cancelled before the claim arose."

(b)

EFFECTIVE DATE SEC. 9. This Act shall take effect at the end of the ninety-day period beginning on the date of its enactment.

10 The words to this point in subsec. (b) were substituted in lieu of the words "The President shall by regulation, establish liability insurance requirements" by sec. 602(2) of the Department of State Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1984 and 1985 (Public Law 98-164; 97 Stat. 1042).

11 Sec. 602(3) of the Department of State Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1984 and 1985 (Public Law 98-164; 97 Stat. 1042), substituted the reference to the Director of the Office of For eign Missions in lieu of a reference to the President.

12 Sec. 203(bX4) of the Department of State Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1982 and 1989 (Public Law 97-241; 96 Stat. 291) amended the parenthetical phrase. It previously read as follows: "(as defined in the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations)".

i. Diplomatic Reciprocity (1) Equivalency of Representation Between U.S. and Hostile

Powers

Partial Text of Public Law 98-618 (Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year

1985, H.R. 5399), 98 Stat. 3298, approved November 8, 1984

AN ACT To authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1985 for intelligence and intelli

gence-related activities of the United States Government, the Intelligence Community Staff, and the Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and Disability System, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That this Act may be cited as the “Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1985”.

TITLE VI-COUNTERINTELLIGENCE AND OFFICIAL

REPRESENTATION

POLICY TOWARD CERTAIN AGENTS OF FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS

SEC. 601. (a) It is the sense of the Congress that the numbers, status, privileges and immunities, travel, accommodations, and facilities within the United States of official representatives to the United States of any foreign government that engages in intelligence activities within the United States harmful to the national security of the United States should not exceed the respective numbers, status, privileges and immunities, travel accommodations, and facilities within such country of official representatives of the United States to such country.

(b) Beginning one year after the date of enactment of this section, and at intervals of one year thereafter, the President shall prepare and transmit to the Committee on Foreign Relations and Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs and Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives a report on the numbers, status, privileges and immunities, travel, accommodations, and facilities within the United States of official representatives to the United States of any foreign government that engages in intelligence activities within the United States harmful to the national security of the United States and the respective numbers, status, privileges and immunities, travel, accommodations, and facilities within such country of official representatives of the United States 9. Relating to International Agreements on Children

122 U.S.C. 254c-1.

a. Child Health Revolution

Public Law 98-198 (S.J. Res. 111), 97 Stat. 1355, approved December 1, 1983

JOINT RESOLUTION Expressing the sense of the Congress with respect to

international efforts to further a revolution in child health. Whereas the report entitled “State of the World's Children, 1982

83" of the United Nations Children's Fund (hereafter in this joint resolution referred to as “UNICEF") offers unprecedented hope for a “revolution in child health” which could save the lives of up to twenty thousand of the forty thousand children who

perish daily around the world from malnutrition and disease; Whereas the techniques involved in this health revolution includ

ing oral rehydration home treatment, low-cost vaccines which do not require refrigeration, promotion of breast-feeding, and use of child growth charts to detect malnutrition, are estimated to cost

only a few dollars per child; Whereas this UNICEF report and the activities of UNICEF have

been widely acclaimed by the Secretary General of the United Nations and the heads of the governments of such countries as

the United Kingdom, France, Sweden, India, and Pakistan; and Whereas the President of the United States on April 18, 1983, has

issued a statement endorsing this health revolution for children and calling on the cooperation of United States Government agencies with international organizations and agencies associated in this effort: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That it is the sense of the Congress that

(1) the techniques articulated by UNICEF in its report entitled "The State of the World's Children, 1982-1983" represent an unprecedented low-cost opportunity to significantly reduce child mortality and morbidity throughout the world, and have the full support and encouragement of the Congress at a time of economic difficulty and constriction for all countries;

(2) the President be commended for taking steps to promote, encourage, and undertake activities to further the objectives of the child health revolution and for directing all appropriate United States Government agencies, including the Department of State, the Agency for International Development, and the Department of Health and Human Services to support and cooperate with UNICEF, the World Health Organization, the United Nations Development Program, and other international financial and assistance agencies participating in fostering this child health revolution, and

(2) Soviet Employees on U.S. Diplomatic Premises

Partial Text of Public Law 99-93 (H.R. 2068), 99 Stat. 405, approved August 16,

1985

AN ACT To authorize appropriations for fiscal years 1986 and 1987 for the Depart

ment of State, the United States Information Agency, the Board for International
Broadcasting, and for other purposes.
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the
United States of America in Congress assembled,

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SEC. 136.1 SOVIET EMPLOYEES AT UNITED STATES DIPLOMATIC AND

CONSULAR MISSIONS IN THE SOVIET UNION. (a) LIMITATION.—To the maximum extent practicable, citizens of the Soviet Union shall not be employed as foreign national employees at United States diplomatic or consular missions in the Soviet Union after September 30, 1986.

(b) 2 REPORT.Should the President determine that the implementation of subsection (a) poses undue practical or administrative difficulties, he is requested to submit a report to the Congress describing the number and type of Soviet foreign national employees he wishes to retain at or in proximity to United States diplomatic and consular posts in the Soviet Union, the anticipated duration of their continued employment, the reasons for their continued employment, and the risks associated with the retention of these employees.

1 22 U.S.C. 3943 note.

2 The President issued Determination No. 92-4 (October 24, 1991; 56 F.R. 56567), wherein he stated:

* I hereby determine that implementation of section 136(a) of the [Foreign Relations Authorization) Act l, Fiscal Years 1986 and 1987), poses undue practical and administrative difficulties. Consistent with this determination, you (Secretary of State) are authorized to employ Soviet nationals in nonsensitive areas of the New Embassy Compound in Moscow under strict monitoring by cleared Americans. Further, I delegate to you the responsibility vested in me by section 136(b) of the Act, to report to the Congress on circumstances relevant to this determination. Such responsibility may be redelegated within the Department of State.”.

9. Relating to International Agreements on Children

a. Child Health Revolution

Public Law 98-198 (S.J. Res. 111), 97 Stat. 1355, approved December 1, 1983

JOINT RESOLUTION Expressing the sense of the Congress with respect to

international efforts to further a revolution in child health. Whereas the report entitled "State of the World's Children, 1982

83" of the United Nations Children's Fund (hereafter in this joint resolution referred to as “UNICEF') offers unprecedented hope for a "revolution in child health" which could save the lives of up to twenty thousand of the forty thousand children who

perish daily around the world from malnutrition and disease; Whereas the techniques involved in this health revolution includ

ing oral rehydration home treatment, low-cost vaccines which do not require refrigeration, promotion of breast-feeding, and use of child growth charts to detect malnutrition, are estimated to cost

only a few dollars per child; Whereas this UNICEF report and the activities of UNICEF have

been widely acclaimed by the Secretary General of the United Nations and the heads of the governments of such countries as

the United Kingdom, France, Sweden, India, and Pakistan; and Whereas the President of the United States on April 18, 1983, has

issued a statement endorsing this health revolution for children and calling on the cooperation of United States Government agencies with international organizations and agencies associated in this effort: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That it is the sense of the Congress that

(1) the techniques articulated by UNICEF in its report entitled “The State of the World's Children, 1982-1983" represent an unprecedented low-cost opportunity to significantly reduce child mortality and morbidity throughout the world, and have the full support and encouragement of the Congress at a time of economic difficulty and constriction for all countries;

(2) the President be commended for taking steps to promote, encourage, and undertake activities to further the objectives of the child health revolution and for directing all appropriate United States Government agencies, including the Department of State, the Agency for International Development, and the Department of Health and Human Services to support and cooperate with UNICEF, the World Health Organization, the United Nations Development Program, and other international financial and assistance agencies participating in fostering this child health revolution; and

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