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tions a punishable act, and jamming the reception of Turkish radio and television programs in Bulgaria;

(5) the right of the ethnic Turkish community to freedom of religion has been severely circumscribed by the Government of the People's Republic of Bulgaria, which has closed a number of mosques and barred the importation of copies of the Koran;

(6) emigration by ethnic Turks and others has been banned with only a few exceptions;

(7) beginning in December 1984, the Bulgarian authorities forced the Turkish minority to change their Turkish names to Bulgarian ones, and hundreds of ethnic Turks were killed, injured, or arrested by Bulgarian forces in 1984 and 1985 when they protested this new policy;

(8) the Bulgarian authorities have used both force and coercion to resettle ethnic Turks from their local villages to areas in Bulgaria with small Turkish populations;

(9) in May 1989, Bulgarian troops and police attacked ethnic Turks and others who were peacefully demonstrating against their discriminatory treatment in Bulgaria;

(10) hundreds of demonstrators were killed or wounded in these attacks, and hundreds more were arrested; and

(11) since these demonstrations, the Government of the People's Republic of Bulgaria has forcibly expelled or coerced into emigrating to Turkey thousands of ethnic Turks without either their money or their possessions, often resulting in the separa

tion of families. (b) POLICY.—It is the sense of the Congress that the Congress

(1) strongly condemns the brutal treatment of, and blatant discrimination against, the Turkish minority by the Government of the People's Republic of Bulgaria;

(2) calls upon the Bulgarian authorities to immediately cease all discriminatory practices against this community and to release all ethnic Turks and others currently imprisoned because of their participation in nonviolent political acts;

(3) calls upon the Government of Bulgaria to honor its obligations and public statements concerning the right of all Bulgarian citizens to emigrate freely; and

(4) urges the President and Secretary of State to make strong diplomatic representations to Bulgaria protesting its discriminatory treatment of its Turkish minority and to raise this issue in all appropriate international forums, including the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe meeting on the

environment in Sofia, Bulgaria, this year. (c) 79 ALLOCATION OF FUNDS FOR ASSISTANCE TO CERTAIN TURKISH REFUGEES. Of the funds authorized to be appropriated by section 104(a)(1) for the fiscal year 1990, $10,000,000 shall be available only to the Republic of Turkey for assistance for shelter, food, and other basic needs to ethnic Turkish refugees fleeing the People's Republic of Bulgaria and resettling in the sovereign territory of Turkey. TITLE VIII—PLO COMMITMENTS COMPLIANCE ACT OF

19 Sec. 1102 of this Act waived sec. 704(c) for fiscal years 1990 and 1991, effective on date of enactment of this Act (February 16, 1990).

1989 80

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SEC. 801. SHORT TITLE.

This title may be cited as the “PLO Commitments Compliance
Act of 1989".
SEC. 802. FINDINGS.
The Congress finds that-

(1) United States policy regarding contacts with the Palestine Liberation Organization (including its Executive Committee, the Palestine National Council, and any constituent groups related thereto (hereafter in this title referred to as the "PLO")) set forth in the Memorandum of Agreement between the United States and Israel, dated September 1, 1975, stated that the United States “will not recognize or negotiate with the Palestine Liberation Organization so long as the PLO does not recognize Israel's right to exist and does not accept United Nations Security Council Resolutions 242 and 338";

(2) section 1302 of the International Security and Development Cooperation Act of 1985 (22 U.S.C. 2151 note; Public Law 99-83), effective October 1, 1985, stated that "no officer or employee of the United States Government and no agent or other individual acting on behalf of the United States Government shall negotiate with the PLO or any representatives thereof (except in emergency or humanitarian situations) unless and until the PLO recognizes Israel's right to exist, accepts United Nations Security Council Resolutions 242 and 338, and re nounces the use of terrorism";

(3) the Department of State statement of November 26, 1988, found that “the United States Government has convincing evidence that PLO elements have engaged in terrorism against Americans and others” and that “Mr. (Yasser) Arafat, Chairman of the PLO, knows of, condones, and lends support to such acts; he therefore is an accessory to such terrorism";

(4) Secretary of State Shultz declared on December 14, 1988, that “the (PLO) today issued a statement in which it accepted United Nations Security Council Resolutions 242 and 338, recognized Israel's right to exist in peace and security, and renounced terrorism. As a result, the United States is prepared for a substantive dialogue with PLO representatives";

(5) President Ronald Reagan, subsequent to the decision to open a United States-PLO dialogue, stated that the PLO “must demonstrate that its renunciation of terrorism is pervasive and permanent” and if the PLO reneges on its commitments, the United States "will certainly break off communications";

(6) since the United States agreed to enter into a dialogue with the PLO, there have been several attempted incursions into Israel by the following PLO-affiliated groups: the Popular

80 On March 14, 1990, the President designated and empowered "the Secretary of State to perform, without the approval, ratification, or other approval of the President, the functions of the President set forth in Title VIII of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1990 and 1991; Public Law 101-246.” (55 F.R. 11131).

See other legislation on “Diplomatic Security and Anti-Terrorism” at page 712.

Struggle Front, the Palestine Liberation Front, the Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine, and the Islamic Jihad group;

(7) Yasser Arafat has not renounced any of these incidents, that he has threatened "ten bullets in the chest" to those Palestinians who advocate a cessation of the unrest, and that his principal deputy, Abu Iyad, as well as other senior Al-Fatah figures, have been quoted as saying that the PLO recognition of Israel and renunciation of terrorism is merely tactical and that a Palestinian state is but the first step in the "liberation of Palestine"; 81

(8) 82 the President, following an attempted terrorist attack upon a Tel Aviv beach on May 30, 1990, suspended the United States dialogue with the PLO;

(9) 82 the President resumed the United States dialogue with the PLO in response to the commitments made by the PLO in letters to the Prime Minister of Israel and the Foreign Minister of Norway of September 9, 1993; and

(10) 83 that the United States should regularly evaluate the PLO's compliance with the commitments made by Yasser Arafat on behalf of the PLO in Geneva on December 14, 1988

and on September 9, 1993.84 SEC. 803. POLICY.

(a) IN GENERAL.-The Congress reiterates long-standing United States policy that any dialogue with the PLO be contingent upon the PLO's recognition of Israel's right to exist, its acceptance of United Nations Security Council Resolutions 242 and 338, and its abstention from and renunciation of all acts of terrorism.

(b) POLICY TOWARD IMPLEMENTATION OF PLO COMMITMENTS.-It is the sense of the Congress that the United States, in any discussions with the PLO, should seek

(1) the prevention of terrorism and other violent activity by the PLO or any of its factions; and

(2) the implementation of concrete steps by the PLO consistent with its commitments to recognize Israel and renounce terrorism, including concrete actions that will further the peace process such as

(A) disbanding units which have been involved in terrorism;

(B) publicly condemning all acts of terrorism;

(C) ceasing the intimidation of Palestinians who advocate a cessation of or who do not support the unrest;

(D) calling on the Arab states to recognize Israel and to end their economic boycott of Israel; and

81 Sec. 524(6) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 (Public Law 103-236; 108 Stat. 473), struck out "and" at the end of para. (7).

82 Sec. 524(7) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 (Public Law 103–236; 108 Stat. 473), added paras. (8) and (9).

83 Sec. 524(5) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 (Public Law 103-236; 108 Stat. 473), redesignated former para. (8) as para. (10).

84 Sec. 524(4) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 (Public Law 103-236; 108 Stat. 473), inserted “and on September 9, 1993”.

(E) amending the PLO's Covenant to remove provisions which undermine Israel's legitimacy and which call for Is

rael's destruction. (c) POLICY TOWARD RECENT ARMED INCURSIONS INTO ISRAEL BY PLO-AFFILIATED GROUPS.—During the next round of talks with the PLO, should such talks occur after the date of enactment of this Act, the representative of the United States should obtain from the representative of the PLO a full accounting of the following attempted incursions into Israel which occurred after Yasser Arafat's statement of December 14, 1988:

(1) On December 26, 1988, an attempted armed infiltration into Israel by boat by four members of the PLO-affiliated Popular Struggle Front.

(2) On December 28, 1988, an attempted armed infiltration into Israel by three members of the PLO-affiliated Palestine Liberation Front.

(3) On January 24, 1989, an unprovoked attack on an Israeli patrol in Southern Lebanon by the PLO-affiliated Palestine Liberation Front.

(4) On February 5, 1989, an attempted armed infiltration into Israel by nine members of the PLO-affiliated Palestine Liberation Front and Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine.

(5) On February 23, 1989, an attempted attack on targets in Israel by members of the PLO-affiliated Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine.

(6) On February 27, 1989, a PLO-affiliated Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine ambush of a pro-Israeli Southern Lebanese army vehicle.

(7) On March 2, 1989, an attempted armed infiltration into Israel by four members of the PLO-affiliated Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine headed for the civilian town of Zarit.

(8) On March 13, 1989, an attempted armed infiltration into Israel by three members of the PLO-aligned Palestine Liberation Front.

(9) On March 15, 1989, an attempted attack on Israel

through Gaza by two members of the Islamic Jihad group. SEC. 804. REPORTING REQUIREMENT.

(a) REPORT ON ARMED INCURSIONS.-In the event that talks are held with the PLO after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State, shall, within 30 days after the next round of such talks, report to the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives any accounting provided by the representative of the PLO of the incidents described in section 803(c).

(b) REPORT ON COMPLIANCE WITH COMMITMENTS.—In conjunction with each written policy justification required under section (3)(b)(1) of the Middle East Peace Facilitation Act of 1994 or every 180 days,,85 the President shall submit to the Speaker of the House of Representatives and the chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate a report, in unclassified form to the maximum extent practicable, regarding progress toward the achievement of the measures described in section 803(b). Such report shall include

85 Sec. 524(1) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 (Public Law 103-236; 108 Stat. 473), struck out "Beginning 30 days after the date of enactment of this

Continued

(1) a description of actions or statements by the PLO as an organization, its Chairman, members of its Executive Committee, members of the Palestine National Council, or any constituent groups related thereto, as they relate to the Geneva commitments of December 1988 and each of the commitments described in section (4)A) of the Middle East Peace Facilitation Act of 1994 (Oslo commitments),86 including actions or statements that contend that the declared “Palestinian state” encompasses all of Israel;

(2) a description of the steps, if any, taken by the PLO to evict or otherwise discipline individuals or groups taking actions inconsistent with the Geneva and Oslo 87 commitments;

(3) a statement of whether the PLO, in accordance with procedures in Article 33 of the Palestinian National Covenant, has repealed provisions in that Covenant which call for Israel's destruction;

(4) a statement of whether the PLO has repudiated its “strategy of stages" whereby it seeks to use a Palestinian state in the West Bank and Gaza as the first step in the total elimination of the state of Israel;

(5) a statement of whether the PLO has called on any Arab state to recognize and enter direct negotiations with Israel or to end its economic boycott of Israel;

(6) a statement of whether "Force 17" and the "Hawari Group”, units directed by Yasser Arafat that have carried out terrorist attacks, have been disbanded and not reconstituted under different names;

(7) a statement of whether the following PLO constituent groups conduct or participate in terrorist or other violent activities: the Fatah; the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine; the Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine; the Arab Liberation Front; the Palestine Liberation Front;

(8) a statement of the PLO's position on the unrest in the West Bank and Gaza, and whether the PLO threatens, through violence or other intimidation measures, Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza who advocate a cessation of or who do not support the unrest, and who might be receptive to taking part in elections there;

(9) a statement of the position of the PLO regarding the prosecution and extradition, if so requested, of known terrorists

Act, and every 120 days thereafter in which the dialogue between the United States and the PLO has not been discontinued” and inserted in lieu thereof “In conjunction with each written policy justification required under section (3xb)(1) of the Middle East Peace Facilitation Act of 1994 or every 180 days," (resulting in a double comma).

86 Sec. 524(2) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 (Public Law 103-236; 108 Stat. 473), struck out “regarding (the) cessation of terrorism and recognition of Israel's right to exist" and inserted in lieu thereof “and each of the commitments described in section (4XA) of the Middle East Peace Facilitation Act of 1994 (Oslo commitments)".

87 Sec. 524(3) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 (Public Law 103-236; 108 Stat. 473), inserted "and Oslo” after "Geneva".

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